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A STANDARD HISTORY OF 

Lake County, Indiana 



AND THE 



Calumet Region 



Under the Editorial Supervision of 

WILLIAM FREDERICK HOWAT, M. D. 

Hammond, Indiana" 



Assisted by 
A. (I. Lundquist A. M. Turner 

C. 0. Holmes George W. Lewis 

•Capt. II. S. Norton John J. Wheeler 
Albert Maack 



VOLUME II 



ILLUSTRATED 



THE LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY 

CHICAGO AND NEW YORK 
1915 



'9 



1159707 



r 






Lake County and the Calumet Region 



Hon. Louis A. Bryan. In popular opinion the history of Gary 
begins with the year 1906, with the magnificent enterprise of the United 
States Steel Corporation in creating an industrial city from the founda- 
tion up. However, much interesting history precedes the coming of the 
Steel Corporation, and concerning the phase of Gary ? s growth and devel- 
opment no one man is better informed or had a more intimate part in the 
actual events than Louis A. Bryan, to whom may properly be given the 
credit for the farsighted vision which looked ahead nearly twenty years 
and visualized the splendid city which now stands on the lake shore and 
is known to the world as Gary. Mr. Bryan acquired his interests and 
established his home in what is now Gary in 1894, and what is of special 
interest to note, established in 1896 the Calumet Advance, which was the 
first newspaper published on the site of the modern city, and he also held 
the office of postmaster of the Village of Calumet from 1898 to 1906, 
and was justice of the peace for the same period. The files of the Advance 
contain many valuable statistics of the early history of Gary, and Mr. 
Bryan has contributed much other information from data in his pos- 
session and from his personal recollections to the editors of this publica- 
tion. A brief sketch of his own career is therefore an appropriate sub- 
ject for the biographical contents of this history. 

Louis A. Bryan was born near Jackson, Michigan, September 16, 
1855, a son of Asahel and Louisa (Coomer) Bryan, being the youngest of 
eight children. From his father, Asahel Bryan, he inherited his sterling 
character, his love for pioneering, and taste for the law and mechanical 
pursuits, and during his early years learned in the school of actual 
experience horsemanship, scientific farming, the craft of the woodsman, 
and the trades of cabinet maker and machinist. He became an expert 
with many tools, and at Lansing was at one time engaged in making 
coffins and fine furniture. "While a resident of Michigan he was for 
thirteen years engaged in the agricultural implement business, and rep- 
resented as general agent Aultman, Miller & Co., of Akron, Ohio, manu- 
facturers of the "Buckeye" haying and harvesting machinery. From 
Michigan he went to Omaha, Nebraska, where he established the only 
coffin factory at that time west of Chicago, and sold his goods to the 
wholesale trade. 

Mr. Bryan is a lawyer by profession, having read law in the intervals 
of his business career, and was admitted to the bar at Chicago in 1890. 
While engaged in practice at Chicago he came to Lake County in 1894, 
when there was little except dense forest between Whiting and Michigan 
City, and bought several thousand acres of land, much of which is now 
included within the city limits of Gary. His home at what is now Island 

475 



476 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

Park, consisting of nearly twenty acres, was carved with his own hand 
out of what was then only a dense jungle of sand and swale. It was at 
that time that he planned a city, which to a large degree was the prede- 
cessor of the modern Gary. lie laid out, and at his own expense par- 
tially improved, twenty miles of the present streets,. including Broadway 
from the Wabash Railway tracks south to the Little Calumet River. He 
did that city planning from 1894 to 1906. While here in those early days 
he secured the location and erection of an extensive piano-stool factory, 
one of the early industries. The factory buildings were later transformed 
into and now constitute the terminal station of the Gary and Interurhan 
Railroad at Twenty-second Avenue and Jefferson Street. He was also 
for several years engaged in the cultivation of 225 acres of land, ami 
for about eight years operated an extensive business in sand, selling two 
trainloads of sand every day. At one time he had a Belgian hare farm, 
and kept about twenty-five hundred of those animals. From his land 
he sold some four hundred tons of hay every year, and cultivated about 
forty acres of corn, potatoes and other crops. Being confident that this 
portion of the lake shore would some day be the site of a great city, he 
bought all the land he could, and used his influence wherever possible 
to promote the development and establish the foundation for the coming 
city. From 1890 to 1900 Mr. Bryan practiced law in Chicago, and was 
admitted to the Indiana bar in 1900. During his career as a lawyer he 
has handled about thirty-three hundred lawsuits. He is justly entitled 
to the distinction of being the first citizen of Gary, the first postmaster, 
the first justice of the peace: he established the first newspaper in the 
district, was the first to sign the petition for the incorporation of Gary, 
held and directed its first election, and was Gary's first treasurer. 

Since the Steel Corporation acquired its holdings and began the 
building of its great plant in 1906, Mr. Bryan has been rapidly disposing 
of his extensive land holdings in this vicinity. A large part of the resi- 
dence and business district of Gary has grown up on land that was at 
one time owned by him. 

On January 6, 1876, Mr. Bryan married Evva Courter, of Dimondale, 
Michigan. Her death occurred in 1910. Into their home they adopted 
a niece, Mona Demode, who married Harry L. Sultzbaugh, a promising 
young business man who is now actively engaged in the real estate busi- 
ness in Gary. 

On August 18, 1912, Mr. Bryan married Winifred Harner, daughter 
of Mr. Henry Harner, of Detroit, They have one son, Roderick Louis 
Bryan, born July 5, 1913. This son, now at the age of only two years, 
shows many evidences of genius beyond the ordinary, and with the multi- 
tude of advantages which will be his, not possessed by his father or his 
grandfather in their youth, a future may be predicted for him that will 
enable him to carve his mark also upon history's page. 

Mr. Bryan cast his first vote (1876) in support of prohibition prin- 
ciples, and has been one of the ardent workers in that party ever since. 
For ten years he was the only man in Calumet Township who voted the 
prohibition ticket, He has displayed great courage and persistence in 
advocating the restriction of the liquor traffic in his community, and the 
incident is still remembered by many citizens how in 1908 he caused the 
closing and illegalizing of 119 saloons in Gary in a single night. Mr. 
Bryan has been a member of the Good Templars' organization since 
1869 ; has held the offices of worthy chief of the local lodge, district chief 
of the district lodge, and grand worthy chief of the grand lodge of that 




^jU^J^ /U 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 477 

organization, lie has also been affiliated with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows for more than thirty-five years, having filled all of the 
highest offices in both lodge and encampment of that order, and is a 
member of the Jenkin Lloyd Jones Church, Lincoln Center, in Chicago. 
As a worker for temperance and woman suffrage he lias made speaking 
campaigns all over the United States, and always at his own expense. 
He has spoken before many notable Chautauqua audiences on the live 
topics of the hour, but always advocating the extermination of the 
drinking saloon and the rightfulness of woman 's ballot, refusing at all 
times to accept any compensation for his services. While his property 
holdings in Lake County are most conspicuous, he also holds large inter- 
ests in Jackson, Michigan, in Chicago, Illinois, and Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia. His residence is considered the finest private home in Indiana, 
surrounded by beautiful grounds, and is one of the show places of Gary. 
Mr. Bryan is an enthusiastic motorist, having bought his first automobile 
in 1902, and has owned some twenty-five machines since that time. He 
lias toured the entire country, including the Pacific Coast States many 
times, driving his car through the Everglades of Florida, besides pene- 
trating far into both Canada and Mexico. His experience in handling 
and adjusting and repairing machinery gained in early life made it 
possible for him to do these things without the aid of any mechanician 
whatsoever. At one time he drove his car over the rails of the Santa 
Fe from Los Angeles to Chicago in eight days, running only in daylight, 
and operating his car as a special under regular dispatchers' orders, 
taking and maintaining the right-of-way over all fast trains at all times, 
arriving in Chicago promptly on schedule limit. He is also a lover of 
fine horses and in the days before the automobile kept twenty or more 
which were regarded as the best in the country. He is an expert rider 
and driver and is very fond of outdoor sports. 

Mr. Bryan has been an intense student and has found time during 
his busy life to delve deeply into many subjects, notable among which 
are astronomy and phrenology. He has constructed a tower on the new 
house at Island Park for the installation of a more powerful telescope 
which is being made to his order, and with which he expects to learn 
many things as yet to him unknown that may be revealed in the starry 
vaults of the universe. 

By his knowledge of phrenology he is able to read human character 
as one reads a signboard by the wayside. He has written many inter- 
esting things and is now engaged on a simple phrenological study for 
young men which will enable its possessor to read human nature unerr- 
ingly at sight, 

The results of his observations into the stellar spaces and his 
researches into the nature of humankind are being carefully compiled 
for the benefit of his young son, Roderick Louis Bryan. 

Hon. Asahel Bryan, the father of Louis A. Bryan, and grandfather 
of Roderick Louis Bryan, was one of the remarkable men of the age in 
which he lived. Born February 4, 1815, on a farm in Camden, Oneida 
County, in the State of New York, he first became a farmer, then a 
mechanic, then a surveyor, then a legislator, then a lawyer, and finally 
a judge. 

At the age of only sixteen years he left the old home in New York 
State and struck out for the Western "unknown." A freight barge on 
the Erie Canal landed him in Buffalo and a sailing ship on Lake Eric 
landed him in Detroit. Even at that age he was a sturdy and competent 



478 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

farm hand, a skilled carpenter and joiner, and exceptionally proficient 
with surveying instruments. 

At the age of twenty-one he was married to Miss Louisa Coomer, 
daughter of David and Betsy Coomer, of Farmington, Oakland County, 
and became one of the leading spirits in the early activities in Michigan, 
he being one of the dauntless few to help mark out and establish and 
create the history of that very prosperous and wealthy and progressive 
and remarkable state. In nearly all of its early history his handiwork 
and the marks of his genius and influence can be seen. He was one of 
the foremost figures and controllers in the change from territory to state 
at the time Michigan was admitted into the Union (1837), he being then 
less than twenty-three years old. 

He was influential as a legislator, and was the author of the law 
abolishing capital punishment in that state, for which act millions have 
blessed his name. And the fact that there has been and is much less 
crime as a consequence of such a law (saying nothing of the rightfulness 
of it) proves the wisdom and foresightedness of the measure. The high- 
est quality of statesmanship consists in foreseeing, far in advance, bene- 
ficial results of legislative action. 

This legislative act of his which forever put a stop in that state to 
the brutal practice of taking human life by law was only one of the many 
measures beneficial to posterity for which he stood like adamant. He 
was a perfect axman and an unerring shot. With his keen-edged and 
glittering ax and his handy, trusty rifle he carved out from the dense 
forest among savage, wild beasts, tbree magnificent farms, the first at 
Novi, Oakland County; the second at Richfield, Genesee County, and 
then with the moving of the state capital from Detroit to Lansing, in 
1847, the last and best in Tompkins, Jackson County, in a great bend of 
Grand River, where Louis A. Bryan, the subject of the sketch, was born. 

On his farm in Jackson County he raised many fine horses and when 
the war of the rebellion broke out in 1861 he turned over his entire 
stable, consisting of some twenty or more of the finest cavalry mounts, 
to the Government without asking for any payment whatever. 

As a horseman he had as few equals as in other things. He never 
met a man who could beat him at a game of checkers, or who could shoot 
straighter. or locate a section corner in the deep forest with more accu- 
racy. He never saw a horse that he could not teach to be ridden, 
driven and worked, and he never used a whip or spiir. The largest tree 
lie ever remembered cutting was a great white oak which measured five 
feet across the stump, and he felled it in two hours. He was a, judge for 
many years, and his decrees were always tempered with mercy and he 
never sentenced a human being to the death penalty. He never did any 
dissipating; his habits were clean, his thoughts pure, and his language 
unoffending. No one ever saw him either angry or excited. Those who 
knew him slightly respected him. Those who knew him better admired 
his life, and those who knew him best loved him for what he was. 

He passed from this life at the ripe age of eighty years, never at any 
time having met with any accident or sustained any personal injury, or 
ever having been confined to his home with sickness for even so much as 
a single day in all his life. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity 
and stood high in that organization. 

After breakfast on the morning of his eightieth birthday he called 
his sons and daughters into his presence and after reciting to them many 
of the stirring events of his life's career he bid them all good-bye, then 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 479 

went peacefully to sleep. In ten minutes his breathing became per- 
ceptibly shorter, and still shorter, until, in another ten minutes he ceased 
to breathe altogether. His passing was like unto the dropping of ripe 
fruit. 

Asahel Bryan's was a perfect life and a perfect death, and whether 
his son, Louis A. Bryan, and his grandson, Roderick Louis Bryan, will be 
able to equal or exceed the records made by their illustrious forebear is a 
problem that remains as yet unsolved. 

John D. Smalley. The present mayor of the City of Hammond has 
lived there for more than twenty years, is a veteran in the railway 
service, and has been an official of the city for the past nine years, leav- 
ing the office of city comptroller to take his present office. His adminis- 
tration as mayor during the past three years has been in every respect 
praiseworthy, and many improvements in municipal affairs may be 
traced to the energetic leadership of Mayor Smalley. 

John D. Smalley was born at Upper Sandusky, Ohio. He graduated 
from the high school in his native city in 1878, and during the following 
two years was employed as a bookkeeper at Nashville, Tennessee. Re- 
turning to Ohio in 1880, he entered the employ of the Pennsylvania 
railroad, and has been a railroad man for more than thirty years. While 
with the Pennsylvania Company he was promoted from one position to 
another, and in 1892 came to Hammond to become agent for the Erie 
railroad. From the duties of local agent in 1903 he was moved to larger 
responsibilities as supervising inspector of the joint rates inspection 
bureau with headquarters in Chicago. However, Mr. Smalley has re- 
tained his residence in Hammond. 

On May 1, 1905. he was appointed city comptroller and held that 
office until March 8, 1911. On the resignation of Judge Lawrence Becker 
as mayor he was appointed to fill the vacancy, and was regularly elected 
mayor in November, 1913, on the democratic ticket. 

John H. Claussen. A Crown Point business man with many years 
of profitable relations with the community, John II. Claussen is a native 
of Germany but has spent most of his life in Northern Indiana, and has 
been a farmer, was in the agricultural implement business for some 
years, and finally took advantage of the opportunities created by the 
rapid growth of the automobile business and now handles some of the 
leading makes of cars sold in Lake County. Mr. Claussen has proved 
himself the man for the business in which he is now occupied, and his 
popularity and prominence in automobile circles is steadily increasing. 

John H. Claussen was born in Germany May 30, 1872, a son of 
Claus C. and Phoebe Claussen. His father, who was a farmer both in 
Germany and after his removal to America, came to Porter County, 
Indiana, in 1882 and to Lake County in 1888. The son finished his 
education after arriving in Indiana, and as a youth entered a wholesale 
produce and grocery house in Chicago, where he remained from 1886 
to 1894 and gained an extensive knowledge of trade and business gen- 
erally. Returning to the Indiana farm, he followed agriculture for 
some years, and in 1903 established himself in the agricultural imple- 
ment business at Crown Point with Charles H. Meeker, under the firm 
name of Meeker & Claussen. In 1911 Mr. Claussen sold out his interests 
in the firm and established a local agencv for the handling of automo- 



480 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

biles. His chief business now is distributing the cars of higher grade, 
the Chalmers, Studebaker, Maxwell, Overland and Apperson. 

Mr. Claussen for the past six years has served as township trustee. 
For two years he was general superintendent of the Lake County Agri- 
cultural Society. Besides his other business he is half owner in the 
Hayes & Claussen East Park subdivision at Crown Point. Mr. Claus- 
sen is a member and director of the Crown Point Chamber of Commerce, 
affiliates with the Knights of Pythias and the Modern Woodmen of 
America, and the Independent Order of Foresters, and his family 
are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

On February 10, 1897, Mr. Claussen married Anna Kuehl of Lake 
County. Their four children are Harry, Arthur, Benjamin and Bernice. 

Charles H. Meeker. The Meeker family have been identified with 
Lake County for more than forty-five years, and Mr. Charles H. Meeker 
has been best known in Crown Point, the county seat, as a dealer in 
agricultural implements, a business started by him more than twenty 
years ago. 

Charles H. Meeker was born in Calhoun County, Michigan, Novem- 
ber 2, 1857, a son of Sherman and Elizabeth A. (Cress) Meeker. The 
father, who was a native of Pennsylvania, moved out to Illinois, later 
to Michigan, and in 1867 settled in Center Township of Lake County 
and was a farmer until his retirement to Crown Point. He and his 
wife, who is also a native of Pennsylvania, were the parents of four 
children : Nathan B., Charles H., Henrietta and J. Frank. 

Charles H. Meeker passed his childhood and early youth in White, 
Carroll and Lake counties, Indiana, was reared on a farm and got his 
education from the district schools. At the age of twenty-three he 
married, and then settled down to farming in Center and Ross town- 
ships, and finally brought his experience as a practical agriculturist 
to the agricultural implement business, which he established at Crown 
Point in 1891. For a number of years Mr. Meeker was associated with 
J. H. Claussen in that business. 

Mr. Meeker was married September 22, 1880. to Rosa A. Sweeney, 
daughter of James and Elizabeth (Johnson) Sweeney. She was born 
in Center Township of Lake County, and she and her husband attended 
the same school. Mr. Meeker is affiliated with the Independent Order 
of Foresters, is a republican in politics, and in a public-spirited man- 
ner has borne his share of responsibilities as a citizen. 

The Gary Public School System. It is a statement of facts, and 
in no sense rhetorical exaggeration, that the Gary Public School System 
is the educational wonder of America. There is probably not a well 
posted educator in the country who is not to some extent familiar with 
the facilities and the quality of instruction offered to the rising genera- 
tion through the Gary schools. The educational service afforded by the 
Gary public schools is unsurpassed by those in any of the larger cities 
and most progressive communities in the United States, and the local 
system has again and again been a subject of description and comment 
not only in school journals but in the general newspaper press. 

It is probable that no community of its size in America has a more 
cosmopolitan population to serve through its public schools than Gary. 
The 40.000 inhabitants of this city represent at least thirty-eight 
nationalities, and it is an important fact that not alone the second 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 481 

generation of these polyglot people supply the scholastic enrollment of 
the schools, but hundreds of these immigrants themselves, earning their 
daily livelihood by work in the mills and factories, attend the various 
classes of instruction offered by the public schools and through other 
organized educational centers of the city. 

To provide the schoolhouses and the other material equipment for 
the educational sendee of such a community is alone a tremendous 
achievement for a new community like Gary, and in this article first 
attention will be called to the economic side of the public school. During 
the fiscal year of 1913-14, the City of Gary spent the sum of $94,696.58 
in the permanent improvement of the various school buildings of the 
city. Of this amount the larger portion was spent on the Froebel 
School, and with such improvements the various school properties of 
the citv are valued as follows: Froebel, $401,552.51; Emerson, $374,- 
285.94;* Jefferson, $105,507.87; Beveridge, $32,505.12; Glen Park, 
$18,515.92; Ambridge, $2,544.07; West Garv, $1,251.00; Clarke, 
$5,501.20; Twelfth Avenue, $200.00; School Farm, $25,000; Twenty- 
first Avenue, $100.00; Fourteenth Avenue, $2,160.00; Twenty-fourth 
Avenue, $4,695.38; general equipment, $1,231.50. The total valuation 
of school properties in Gary is $975,050.81. The record for the various 
schools show that during the year just mentioned 4.350 children were 
enrolled, distributed as follows : Froebel, 1,612 ; Emerson, 800 ; Jef- 
ferson, 786; Beveridge, 498; Glen Park, 211; Ambridge, 134; West 
Gary, 25; Clarke, 57; Twenty-fourth Avenue, 227; Twelfth Avenue, 
none. The total cost of instruction in the Gary schools was $151,315.21. 
of which amount more than $130,000 was paid out as salaries to teachers, 
supervisors and principals. Besides these sums the operation of the 
schools cost $40,177.21. while the maintenance of the schoolhouses and 
grounds cost $17,326.11. The evening schools and the summer schools 
are an expensive but useful feature of the Gary school system. In the 
evening schools a total of 3,146 pupils were enrolled, and the cost of 
maintaining the schools was, instruction, $14,035.18 ; operation evening 
schools, $5,168.82; but through these classes many individuals received 
a semblance of education that otherwise they would not have received 
at all. Records also show that more than $3,848.67 was spent in medical 
examination of school children. 

In many American communities education has been conducted on 
such traditional and routine lines that it would be difficult to secure 
satisfying answer to the query. What is the aim and purpose of the 
school system ? In a recent educational report of the Lake County 
schools Superintendent William A. Wirt of Gary answers this question 
succinctly and convincingly: "In Gary the schools try to appropriate 
the street and alley time of the children by providing- opportunities for 
work and play as well as opportunities for study." Superintendent 
Wirt goes on to explain that the character of the child is formed during 
all its active hours, and since the homes in cities and towns no longer 
provide the opportunities for the wholesome work and play of children, 
character training is consequently left to the schools and to the hap- 
hazard influences and activities between the school and the home. He 
calls attention also to the fact that the average time allotted in the school 
for study is 2y 2 hours each day, but only few children are so book- 
minded that they are able to form habits of mental activity from the 
study of books alone, and by the majority of children this time is spent 



482 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

largely in day dreaming. On the other hand, the habits of activity 
formed in the streets and alleys are the result of about five hours per 
day, or double the school time. Says Mr. Wirt: "Society seems to be 
so organized in cities and tOAvns that the civic care of the child must 
now take over industrial training and play. But this additional burden 
need not be assumed by the established school. The child may live a 
part of his life in the home, may study in school for 2y 2 hours a day, 
and may learn to work in a separate trade school and play in a play- 
ground park for the five hours of the street and alley time. The character 
forming influence of the street and alley time will be removed and the 
wholesome activities substituted without any additional burden on the 
established school. * * * it is the conviction of the Gary school 
management that not only is the wholesome character building of the 
child inseparably linked with his work and his play, but that for the 
great majority of children mastery of academic school subjects cannot 
be separated from work and play. The child must want to know and 
must be willing to put forth efforts to learn the things the established 
school has to teach. The child himself is the greatest factor in the 
learning process. He must educate himself. * * * If the child 
is to appreciate the opportunities of the school he must feel the need 
right now for the things the school is teaching or should teach. To- tell 
him that he will find out and realize in twenty years hence will not 
do. In the child's play and in his work all sorts of needs for academic 
school studies can be created. The child cannot do the things that he 
would like to do or get the things that he would like to have, because 
he has not mastered the academic school subjects. The child can be 
bitterly disappointed every day because of his inability and lack of 
training and can be sent to his teacher of the academic subjects with 
a vivid, real appreciation of the importance to him of the things the 
schools have to teach. When the child Avants to know and is willing 
to put forth an effort to learn the things the school should teach, then 
the teaching process becomes a simple matter. The Gary schools include 
the workshop and playground along with the study room, not because 
they wish to sugar-coat the study with sentimental play and work. 
The study room schools need the work shop and playground to motovize 
the school studies. 

''The school cannot crowd into the study room time of 2V 2 hours 
a day the work shop and the playground time. The five hours of the 
street and alley time are sorely needed for the work shop and play- 
ground activities. Resides, the street and alley time is undoing the 
good work of the home and school and must by all means be eliminated. 
The school day in Gary is. therefore, three hours for study, three hours 
for work and constructive play, and two hours for voluntary sport. The 
schools in Gary have only half as many study rooms, only half as 
many school desks as there are children enrolled. While one set of 
children are in the school seats in the study room learning to read, 
write and figure from formal drill and text books, another set of children 
are on the playgrounds, in the gymnasiums, swimming pools, auditoriums, 
gardens, science laboratories and work shops. Rut all of the school 
facilities are occupied all of the time. The pupil capacity of the study 
room is doubled. The per capita cost of the study room is much higher 
than the per capita cost of the work shops and playgrounds that are 
substituted for study rooms. Therefore the total per capita cost of 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 483 

the combined study room, work shop and playground school is less 
than the per capita cost of the established exclusive study room school. 
Many school plants have auditoriums, work shops and playgrounds 
added as extras. When the study room teachers are occupied the 
auditorium, playground and work shop and their several teachers are 
idle. And just to the extent that these special features of the school 
plant are used the regular study rooms and regular teachers are idle. 
The Gary schools eliminate the providing of two or more places and 
sometimes teachers for each child with only one in use at any time. 
The child has the study room with the specially trained teacher in charge 
for the formal drill work with the text books and reading, writing and 
arithmetic. He also has the work shop and the playground with spe- 
cially trained teachers in charge. But when any one group of children 
is using any one school facility, other groups of children are using the 
remaining facilities. Thus the combined study room, work shop and 
playground schools are provided at a much lower per capita cost for 
investment in plant, annual maintenance of the plant and cost for 
instruction than the usual established exclusive study school. The extra 
cost, to the community of providing separate playground parks and 
industrial schools is eliminated altogether. 

"The school plants are open from 8:20 a. m. to 5:00 p. m. and 
from 7 :00 p. m. to 9 -.30 p. m. The enrollment for adults for evening 
activities almost equals the enrollment of children for day school activi- 
ties. The school plant designed for the study, work and play of children 
in the day school is also admirably adapted for adult use at night. The 
unit school plant in Gary accommodates the day nursery, the kinder- 
garten, the common school grades and the high school in each building. 
The facilities provided for the older children during the day are de- 
signed for use of adults at night, These facilities include gymnasiums, 
swimming pools, science laboratories, auditoriums and large corridors 
and rooms for receptions, dances, parties, entertainments and club 
rooms. The following work shops are provided: Carpentry, cabinet- 
making, steam and gas fitting, plumbing, printing, machine fitting, elec- 
trical work, foundry, forging, painting, sheet metal work, domestic science 
and art, laundry, mechanical and architectural drawing, industrial 
mathematics, etc. 

"The unit school plant will accommodate approximately twenty- 
seven hundred children in day school and the same number at night. 
Any two school plant units provide a sufficient amount of cheap metal 
work, machine fitting, foundry work, forging, cabinet work, carpentry, 
plumbing, steam and gas fitting, printing, painting, electrical work, care 
of grounds, lunch room, business, laundry, bacteriological work, coal 
and other testing, to maintain these departments with master workmen 
as instructors employed for full time in each. The number of students 
working at one time as apprentices with each master need not exceed 
six. The productive work of each department more than balances the 
cost of material and the master's salary. Any trade department that 
cannot produce enough to pay the salary of instructor and cost of 
materials used is not worth much for industrial education. Some eco- 
nomic pressure must be placed on the department to secure anything like 
real industrial conditions. The school in doing its own work does not 
take anything away from workmen. On the contrary, more desirable 
positions are created for workmen and they receive a larger share of the 



484 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

product than they would under commercial conditions. The employers 
gain by securing from the school better trained workmen, which is worth 
much more to them than the profit on the school work. 

"The Gary schools try to give the children an opportunity to do 
many kinds of work and find out the things for which they are best 
fitted. We believe that it is just as important for a boy to have a 
chance to try painting, for instance, and learn that it is not the work 
for which he is fitted, as it is for other boys who should be painters to 
have a chance to learn the trade. We do not wish to assume the respon- 
sibility of vocational guidance, but try to provide an opportunity for 
intelligent vocational selection. 

"Since groups of pupils of all ages are playing, working and study- 
ing all of the time during the school hours, special provision can be made 
for exceptional children. A child who is weak physically and not able 
to play can give the entire school time to the playground, gymnasium, 
garden and work shops. A child who is weak in arithmetic or any 
other subject can be given extra time in other classes in arithmetic or 
the particular subject needing such extra time. Each child can have 
just the amount of work in each department and the kind of work 
that he individually needs. 

"It is also possible to make any combination of classes in any sub- 
jects. Fourth and eighth grade pupils, for instance, may be combined 
in science and shop work and separated in other subjects. When the 
work in any subject is of such a character that younger children can 
learn better by working with older children, they have the opportunity. 
The direct teaching of the instructor is supplemented by the uncon- 
scious education of living in a world of wholesome play, work and study. 
The indirect teaching of the older children is of great value to the 
younger, and the responsibility thus assumed has the highest educa- 
tional value for the older children. We try to give the children not a 
playground, not a shop, not a study room, but a life." 

William A. Wirt. It is a statement of facts, and in no sense rhe- 
torical exaggeration, that the Gary Public School System is the educa- 
tional wonder of America. There is probably not a well posted educator 
in the country who is not to some extent familiar with the facilities 
and the quality of instruction offered to the rising generation through 
the Gary schools. The educational service afforded by the Gary public 
schools is unsurpassed by those in any of the larger cities and most 
progressive communities in the United States, and the local system 
has again and again been a subject of description and comment not 
only in school journals but in the general newspaper press. A descrip- 
tion and history of the Gary school system is left for other pages of 
this publication, and this article is a brief sketch of the man whose ideas 
have been carried out in creating this remarkable center of common 
education, William A. Wirt. In this connection a brief quotation of 
a paragraph from a current article is appropriate : ' ' That council was 
very fortunate in the selection of William A. Wirt for superintendent. 
At a time when there were no schools in Gary and few children, he was 
engaged at a salary which none except great cities pay, and was told 
to create a school system. Mr. Wirt is a man of ideas, energy and 
executive ability. He took up the great task with earnestness and so 
effectively that Gary has been for several years a Mecca for educational 
pilgrims from all parts of the United States.'' 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 485 

William A. Wirt is a native of Indiana, born at Markle in 1874, 
a son of a farmer, Emanuel Wirt, and Mary (Elick) Wirt. As a boy 
he spent much of his time on the farm, and attended the public schools 
at Markle and Bluffton. He is a graduate of DePauw University, 
where he took his regular academic work and spent one year in post- 
graduate study. His career as an educator began in 1893, when he 
became principal of the high school at Redkey, Indiana. He held that 
position until 1895, and then was superintendent of the school until 
1897. Leaving his school work, he continued studies at DePauw Uni- 
versity during 1897-98, and also taught in the local high school, and 
then took the superintendeney of the Bluffton public schools. Mr. 
Wirt remained superintendent at Bluffton from 1898 to 1907. He was 
chosen to superintend the establishment of a complete school system for 
the new industrial city of Gary, and took charge of the local schools 
in October, 1906. Since that time he has probably done more creative 
work as an educator than any school executive in the country. In 1914 
he was engaged by the City of New York to act as school advisor from 
October, 1914, to September, 1915. 

Mr. Wirt was married in 1899 to Bertha Ann Koch, of Bluffton, 
Indiana. Their three children are Franz, aged ten; Sherwood, aged 
three, and Bertha Eleanore, aged one year. Mr. Wirt has taken thirty- 
two degrees in Scottish Rite Masonry and belongs to the college frater- 
nities Beta Theta Pi and Phi Beta Kappa. In politics he is independent, 
and his church is the Methodist Episcopal. Mr. Wirt is also a director 
of the First National Bank of Gary, and is president of the Central 
Building Company. 

Otto H. Duelke. For eight years city clerk of Hammond, and 
now in the office of city treasurer, Mr. Duelke 's record as an official 
has been characterized by fidelity of performance and obliging courtesy 
to all who have used his office, and he is one of the most popular men 
in the present city government. 

Otto H. Duelke was born at Breslau, Germany, January 8, 1875, 
a son of Otto and Johanna Duelke. His father was a boot and shoe 
merchant, and came to America in 1883, and has been a resident of 
Hammond now for thirty years, being retired from business and enjoy- 
ing the comforts and prosperity of a long and well-spent career. Otto 
H. Duelke received his education in the public schools of Hammond, 
where he has lived since he was eight years of age, and his first busi- 
ness experience, in earning his own living, was with the Hammond 
Packing Company, in the butterine department. In 1895 he joined 
his father in business, and was in various lines until he entered public 
life. In 1905 Mr. Duelke was elected city clerk of Hammond, was 
reelected in 1909, and after the close of his second term as city clerk 
was a successful candidate for the office of city treasurer. 

On February 1, 1902, Mr. Duelke married Miss Dina Zervas, a 
daughter of Christian and Marie Zervas. Their four children are 
named Herman. William, Erwin, and Emma. The family are members 
of the Evangelical Church. Mr. Duelke is treasurer of the Saenger- 
bund-Fidelia of Hammond, and was one of its organizers. He is affil- 
iated with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Loyal 
Order of Moose, the Independent Order of Foresters, and the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. 



486 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

First National Bank op Hammond. As the largest and oldest 
financial institution operating under a national charter in the Calumet 
region, and the second bank organized in the county, the First National 
Bank of Hammond deserves some individual mention and history in this 
publication. 

It was organized in 1889 with a capital stock of $50,000. Its first 
president was the late M. M. Towle, Sr., while Frank H. Tuthill filled 
the place of cashier. The bank opened for business in quarters on 
Plummer Avenue, near Morton Court, and four years later was moved 
to the corner of Plummer Avenue and Hohman Street in what was 
known as Central Block. About that time E. E. Towle succeeded 
Mr. Tuthill in the office of cashier. 

On the death of the late M. M. Towle, in 1901, a reorganization was 
effected on September 7th of that year, and the present management 
acquired the majority of stock. The present officials are : A. M. Tur- 
ner, president; John E. Fitzgerald, vice president; W. C. Belman, 
cashier; W. F. Mashino and M. M. Towle, Jr., assistant cashiers. The 
board of directors comprise A. M. Turner, P. W. Meyn, W. C. Belman, 
John E. Fitzgerald, Frank S. Betz, John M. Beckman and W. G. 
Paxton. 

At the time of the reorganization in 1901 the capital stock still 
stood at $50,000, while the surplus and undivided profits amounted to 
$30,000, and' deposits were $168,000. In May, 1902, the First National 
occupied its present location at Hohman Street and Sibley Avenue, in 
a building 25 by 60 feet. In October, 1907, the banking quarters 
were enlarged and refitted at an expense of $18,000, all the furnishings 
being of marble and mahogany. 

In February, 1905, an increase of capital was made to $100,000, 
with surplus of $10,000, this increase being the result of dividends from 
stock earnings. 

The First National on January 2, 1909, bought the assets of the old 
Commercial Bank, whose business and history thus became merged with 
the larger organization. At that time Thomas Hammond was president 
of the Commercial Bank, and after its consolidation with the First 
National he became vice president of the latter institution, holding 
that office until his death. On February 7th following this consolida- 
tion the First National increased its capital to $150,000, with surplus 
of $100,000. At the present time the capital remains the same, but the 
surplus, which is one of the chief items in reckoning the strength of 
any banking institution, amounts to $175,000, besides undivided profits 
of* $25,000. The total assets of the First National Bank are now 
approximately $2,200,000. 

A. Murray Turner. For twenty years, A. Murray Turner has been 
a name significant of large enterprise and influence, not only in Ham- 
mond, but in all of Lake County, and the Calumet region. He is presi- 
dent of the largest bank of the county, was active in the building of the 
first street railway of Hammond, and its president for a number of 
years, and he is director, and otherwise officially and financially inter- 
ested, in many of the best known corporations and business and industrial 
concerns of the locality. Mr. Turner is the type of business man who 
is almost instinctively trusted by his fellows, has proved his ability to 
handle and direct large interests, and belongs to the group of men who 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 487 

in Lake County control and uphold the business prosperity of the com- 
munity. 

His is one of the oldest and most prominent families of Lake County. 
Mr. Turner was born at Crown Point, October 3, 185$, a son of David 
and Caroline (Bissell) Turner. The family was founded here by grand- 
father Turner, who was horn in the north of Ireland, came to America 
when a boy, and in 1837 settled in Lake County, where he was one of the 
pioneer families, and where he lived many years. David Turner was 
horn in Ohio, and after coming to Lake County, in 1837, was for several 
years the only merchant in the town of Crown Point. From 1858 to 
1862 he served as a state senator, and under President Lincoln, held the 
office of United States assessor until that office was abolished. For a 
number of years he was president of the First National Bank of Crown 
Point. His death occurred in February, 1890, when seventy-three years 
old. His wife, who is still living at the age of eighty-eight years, was 
born in Trumbull County, Ohio, in the western reserve, where her people 
were pioneers. David Turner and wife had seven children. 

A. Murray Turner was educated in the public schools of Crown Point, 
attended a private school conducted by Mrs. Knight, which was a well 
known institution in its day, and was also a student in the Valparaiso 
University. Mr. Turner has had a varied experience, ranging from farm- 
ing to banking, and while still a young man, was a successful farmer and 
dealer in livestock. He first came into prominence in local affairs in 
Lake County, by his election, in 1888, to the office of sheriff, and he 
served four years, or two terms. At the end of his official service, in 
1893, he moved to Hammond, and has since been closely identified with 
the development of transportation, banking and other affairs in the Calu- 
met region. He joined the syndicate which first put the Hammond street 
railway on a sound basis, built the lines known as the Hammond, Whit- 
ing and East Chicago Electric Railway, and extended the system to 
connect with the Chicago electric lines. Practically the entire network 
of urban and interurban transportation, along the lake shore in North- 
ern Lake County, is the outgrowth of that enterprise in which Mr. 
Turner took so prominent a part twenty .years ago. He served as 
president of the company until 1900, when the interests were sold to the 
South Chicago Street Railway Company. In 1900 Mr. Turner bought 
the electric light plant of Hammond and consolidated it with the gas 
company, which is now known as the Northern Indiana Gas & Electric 
Company. In 1901 he took the lead in the reorganization of the First 
National Bank of Hammond, became its president, and under his direc- 
tion, this has become one of the soundest and most reliable institutions 
of Lake County, with the best showing of resources and deposits. 

Mr. Turner is a director in the Lake County Savings and Trust 
Company; vice president and director in the Champion Potato Machin- 
ery Company; a director in the Lake Countv Title and Guaranty Com- 
pany at Crown Point; a director in Gostlin. Meyn & Company, the oldest 
real-estate and investment company in Lake County, with a capital of 
$300,000 ; and a director in the Frank S. Betz Company. 

As is well known, Hammond is a center of democratic strength in 
politics, and therefore Mr. Turner's defeat as candidate for the office 
of mayor a few years ago, is in no sense disparaging to his personal 
standing and popularity. In 1904 he served as delegate to the National 
Republican Convention which nominated McKinley and Roosevelt. Mr. 



488 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

Turner was prominent in the organization of the Hammond Country 
Club, and its first president. 

On December 31, 1890, Mr. Turner married Miss E. Lillian Black- 
stone, a daughter of Dr. John K. and Margaret (Bryant) Blackstone, 
of Hebron. To this marriage one child, Margaret Caroline, was horn. 
Mrs. Turner died in November, 1900. In 1909 he married Mrs. Rose 
Lotta Brunot, of Greensburg, Pennsylvania, who died in March, 1913, 
leaving two children, John and Rose. Mr. Turner has membership in 
the Hammond Country Club, in the South Shore Country Club of Chi- 
cago, the Hamilton Club of Chicago, and the Sea View Golf Club at 
Atlantic City, New Jersey. As a prominent business man of Hammond, 
he has always been conspicuous in his leadership, and has on many occa- 
sions used time and means to promote local enterprise. The location 
of additional manufacturing concerns in Hammond has been an object 
to which he has given his attention again and again, and every other 
undertaking for local benefit is sure to have his support. Mr. Turner for 
a number of years was a member of the Hammond School Board, and 
since its organization has been a member of the public library board, and 
was one of the building committee which erected the present public library 
building. While Mr. Turner is not a member of any church, yet he is 
heartily in sympathy with their work and is a liberal contributor, as 
will be testified to by many Hammond congregations, and he never loses 
an opportunity to assist in any enterprise which will contribute to the 
general uplift of the community, and the young men in particular. 

i 

David Turner. Some facts regarding the father of A. M. Turner, 
the leading banker and business man of Hammond, have already been 
mentioned. However the career of tins splendid Lake County pioneer 
and early banker deserves some separate memorial and description. 

David Turner was born in Trumbull County, Ohio, December 17, 
1816, the second son and fourth child of Samuel and Jane (Dinwiddie) 
Turner. His parents were married in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in 1810, 
moved to Butler County, Pennsylvania, and then to Ohio, locating in 
the Western Reserve. In 1837 the family went West, to what was then 
almost the frontier in Northern Indiana. They located first at Door 
Village in La Porte County, and then moved to Eagle Creek in Lake 
County, where they took land from the Government. 

David Turner grew up to manhood in Ohio. At that time schools 
were very crude, but he and his brothers managed to "cipher as far as 
the rule of tln*ee in arithmetic." However, their education was not neg- 
lected, for every evening with their father as leader they read Black- 
stone's Commentaries, and on Sunday, if they were not able to attend 
church, they were expected to listen to one of Erskine's sermons or tern 
chapters in the Bible. With such a discipline it was little wonder that 
they became well fitted to take a prominent part in the development of a 
new country. 

Mr. David Turner was married in 1844 to Miss Caroline Bissell of 
Porter County, Indiana. For his domestic establishment he constructed 
a log house on a farm near his father's, where he and his wife lived until 
1850. Mr. Turner then moved to Crown Point, starting a general store, 
and also dealt in farm products, which he sent to market overland, by 
the roads leading through the marshes to the City of Chicago, then a 
comparatively small town. 




DAVID TURNER 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 489 

David Turner was elected probate judge and held that office in Lake 
County until it was abolished. He also served two terms in the Lower 
House, and one in the Senate, from 1855 to 1863. In the latter year he 
was appointed to the office of United States collector of internal revenue 
by President Lincoln and held that position until the office was abolished 
fifteen years later, except for a few months during 1865, when he was 
removed by President Johnson. However, as the senate refused to con- 
firm his successor, he was re-instated. 

In 1863 he was appointed by Governor Morton a delegate from the 
Ninth Congressional District to attend the dedication of the National 
Cemetery at Gettysburg, and stood very near President Lincoln at the 
delivery of that short memorial address which will live and be read while 
the world stands. 

Judge Turner was always interested in education. About 1855, he 
and a few other men of like taste erected a building called the "Acad- 
emy" and for several years they paid a teacher to conduct a school 
that the young might have better opportunities than were afforded by 
the public schools at that time. He was a member of the United Pres- 
byterian Church in Hebron for many years, and a supporter of and 
worker in the Presbyterian Church of Crown Point. 

Mr. Turner was a factor in procuring for Crown Point its first rail- 
road in 1865, then called the Great Eastern, and he deserves special men- 
tion as one of the charter members and organizers and soon afterwards 
president of the First National Bank of Crown Point, which remained 
for ten years the only bank in the county. He remained active in this 
bank until 1883. Doubtless there was no time in his most discreet, indus- 
trious and honorable life when these qualities could be of greater serv- 
ice to the community, than during the pioneer period of banking in Lake 
County, and much credit is due him and others associated with him for 
Lake County's banking record. No depositor in the county ever lost a 
single dollar through the banks, and considering the remarkable growth 
in population and business that is truly a most creditable forty years' 
banking record for any county. 

In summing up Mr. Turner's life, these striking characteristics must 
be recalled by those with whom he came in contact, namely, his natural 
honesty, his unselfishness, his intolerance for shams, and his abhorrence 
of indolence. 

Frederick R. Mott. Prominent among the live, wide-awake busi- 
ness men of Hammond is Frederick R. Mott, who came here while the 
town was yet in its infancy, there having been but six houses in the place 
at the time of his arrival, and in its development and growth he has 
been an important factor. A native of Illinois, he was born in the City 
of Chicago, July 29, 1857, of substantial German ancestry. 

His father, the late Jacob H. Mott, was born and bred in Germany, 
and as a young man came to America in order to better his fortunes. 
Coming westward from New York, he settled in Chicago in 1852, and was 
soon carrying on a thriving business as a contractor and builder, in 
that capacity erecting many of the earlier business blocks of that won- 
derful city. Meeting with much success in his operations, he continued 
an active worker until his death, at a comparatively early age, in 1875. 
He married, in Chicago, Mary Bausch, a native of Germany, who proved 
herself a true helpmeet. 



490 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

Frederick R. Mott was educated in the public schools of his native 
city, acquiring an excellent knowledge of the common branches of 
learning. At the age of seventeen years he came to Hammond, Indiana, 
as an employee of the G. H. Hammond Company, which he entered in a 
humble capacity. Proving himself industrious and eminently faithful 
to the duties imposed upon him, he was promoted from time to time, 
eventually becoming head bookkeeper and foreman of the beef depart- 
ment of that great corporation. In 1887 Mr. Mott embarked in business 
on his own account as a real estate agent, and as a private operator has 
met with undisputed success in his undertakings, being now one of the 
best known and most prosperous real estate men in this section of Lake 
County. He is president of the Lake County Title & Guarantee Com- 
pany and vice president of the Hammond Savings & Trust Company. 
During his residence in this place Mr. Mott has witnessed its growth 
from a hamlet of six houses to its present proportions as a municipality, 
and in its advancement has generously lent his aid and influence. For 
several seasons after his arrival in Hammond the Michigan Central 
Railroad was the only line passing through the place, but now its rail- 
Way facilities are most excellent, and an interurban line connecting 
Hammond with Chicago makes local travel easy and pleasant. 

Mr. Mott married June 24, 1884, Miss Emma Hohman, a daughter 
of Ernst W. and Caroline (Sipley) Hohman, of whom a brief account 
may be found on another page of this work. Mr. and Mrs. Mott have 
five children, namely : Irene, Frederick, Robert, Louis and Walter. 
Politically Mr. Mott is a republican, and has served his fellow-men 
most faithfully in official capacities, from 1894 to 1898, having served 
as mayor of the city. Fraternally he is a member of the Ancient Free 
and Acepted Order of Masons, is a Knight Templar and a Shriner. 

Edward A. Krost, D. D. S. It is in harmony with the fitness of 
things that the son of one of Lake County's pioneer families should 
occupy such a post of honor as mayor of the City of Crown Point. The 
Krost family have been identified with Lake County more than sixty 
years, and Doctor Krost, in addition to his work as a dentist, has been 
more or less closely connected with public affairs for the past twenty 
years. When Crown Point changed its government from that of a town 
to that of a city in July, 1911, he was elected the first councilman from 
the Fourth Ward, and served in that position until the final illness of 
the late and first mayor, Harold Holton Wheeler, at which time the 
council elected Doctor Krost as acting mayor. After Mayor Wheeler's 
death the council chose him to fill the unexpired term, and on November 
4, 1913, at the regular city election, he was chosen the second mayor of 
Crown Point for a term of four years, beginning January 1, 1914. Due 
to *hese active relations with the city government at its beginning, his 
name will have a permanent place in the annals of Crown Point as long 
as that city exists. 

Edward A. Krost was born at Crown Point February 13, 1874. His 
father, the founder of the family in this county, John Krost, was born 
August 6, 1828, in Brandscheid, Germany, and died at Crown Point. 
Indiana March 28, 1890. He w T as educated at the University of Trier 
(or Treves) and in 1851 left Germany and settled in Ross Township of 
Lake County in April, 1853. For several years he was employed as a 
clerk in Hale's store at Merrillville, in Lake County, and later engaged 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 491 

in farming. During the period of the Civil war he was elected and 
served as county treasurer, and later held the office of county auditor. 
He was a man of high civic and personal character, and some special 
mention is made of him in the old settlers' reports by Rev. T. H. Ball 
for the year 1893. John Krost was married at the Turkey Creek Church 
December 23, 1854, to Katherine Horst, a daughter of Nicholas and 
Barbara Horst. The Horst family emigrated to America in 1843, first 
settling in Chicago, and moving to Ross Township, in Lake County, in 
1852. Katherine Horst was born at Daun, Prussia. January 24, 1836, 
and died in Crown Point January 21, 1877. 

Edward A. Krost grew up in Crown Point, attended the local public 
schools, took a commercial course in the University of Notre Dame at 
South Bend, and later pursued two distinct professional courses, grad- 
uating in pharmacy from the University of Valparaiso in 1900, and 
from the Chicago College of Dental Surgery in 1902. Since the latter 
date he has been in active practice as a dentist at Crown Point. From 
1892 to 1896 Doctor Krost served as deputy recorder of Lake County. 

Fraternally he is affiliated with Lake Lodge No. 157, A. F. and 
A. M. ; with Lincoln Chapter No. 53, R. A. M., both at Crown Point: 
and with Valparaiso Commandery No. 28, K. T., at Valparaiso. In 
1903 he was worshipful master of Lake Lodge. He is also a member 
of the Crown Point Chamber of Commerce, of the National Dental 
Association, the Indiana State Dental Society, the Northern Indiana 
Dental Society, and a member of the dental fraternity. Delta Sigma 
Delta, and of the supreme chapter of that organization. He is also a 
member of the Chicago Dental Society. Doctor Krost is a life member 
of the Lake County Old Settlers and Historical Association, and much 
interested in its affairs. Another connection is with the National Geo- 
graphic Society. 

At Crown Point on March 18, 1895, Doctor Krost was married by 
Rev. T. H. Ball to Jennie May Lathrop, who represents one of the old 
and prominent families of Lake County. Mrs. Krost was educated in 
the Crown Point public schools. Her parents were Charles L. and 
Arabella (MacDonald) Lathrop, her father for many years a prominent 
business man of Crown Point. Mrs. Krost is a granddaughter of Alex- 
ander and Ruth A. MacDonald, who were early settlers of Lake County. 
Alexander MacDonald was one of Crown Point's first attorneys, having 
come from New York State, and during the decade of the '50s repre- 
sented the county several terms in the State Legislature. His death 
occurred at Crown Point February 5, 1869. Ruth A. MacDonald, his 
wife, was familiarly known to the people of Crown Point as "Aunt 
Kate." She was born at Akron, Ohio, October 2, 1826, and died at 
Munising, Michigan, August 31, 1905, her body being now at rest in the 
Crown Point Cemetery. Rev. Mr. Ball, the pioneer minister of Lake 
County, preached the sermon of this good woman, and in the course of 
his address said: "She was a faithful mother to many, and a well 
known, highly esteemed woman in Crown Point for nearly fifty years." 

Doctor Krost and wife are the parents of two children : Karl 
Lathrop Krost, born May 12, 1896; and John Rodger Krost, born 
November 9, 1898. Both were born in Crown Point and are now 
attending the Crown Point High School. 

N. P. Banks. While with the business community of Lake County, 
Mr. Banks is perhaps best known as scientific farmer and banker-, the 



492 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

usefulness of his long and active career has not been entirely confined to 
his achievements in practical commercial and agricultural life. When 
a boy during the dark days of the '60s he fought as a Union soldier, and 
is one of the few surviving veterans who are still active in business 
affairs. In a later paragraph mention will be made of a number of 
important movements in civic affairs of which Mr. Banks has been inter- 
ested, and his influence and leadership has been as substantial facts in 
his career as his individual success. Mr. Banks is president of the First 
State Bank of Hobart. 

His birth occurred in Lake County, Ohio, in 1846, but when he was 
six weeks old his parents moved to Laporte County, Indiana, and when 
he was seven years of age they established their home in Lake County, 
Indiana. The common schools supplied his early instruction until he 
was sixteen, and it is an interesting fact that the school he attended in 
those early days is still standing as a landmark illustrating educational 
progress, the building being at least sixty-five years old. 

Early in his youth the nation became involved in the serious busi- 
ness of war, and at the age of sixteen young Banks enlisted in Miller's 
Chicago Battery, and saw three years of active service in the various 
campaigns of the Middle West. He held the rank of sergeant, and was 
generally called the "kid of the company." He participated in the 
great Battle of Chickamauga during the Atlanta campaign, in the cam- 
paign through Eastern Tennessee, and was also at Chattanooga. His 
command was a part of the Fourth Army Corps, to which a large share 
of the credit is given for defeating Hood's army. Though in so many 
battles and through so much hard service for three years, Mr. Banks 
was never wounded, and returned to Lake County a veteran soldier at 
the age of nineteen years. His schooling was then continued until he had 
fitted himself for a teacher, and while instructing a schoolroom full of 
boys and girls during the winter he followed farming, first as a renter 
and then invested his savings in a small place of eighty acres. With 
that as a nucleus he kept increasing his farm land until he had a fine 
estate of 240 acres. In subsequent years as an incident of his general 
prosperity he has dealt extensively in farm lands, but has always kept 
his farm of 240 acres, and uses it for dairy and mixed farming, raising 
cattle, hogs, sheep and sending everything to the market in a form of 
product which will not decrease the fertility of the soil. Mr, Banks is 
an exponent of modern scientific "farming methods, and the value of his 
advocacy of such methods is strengthened by the peculiar success which 
lie has himself made by following out his ideas. Before the Farmers 
Institute of his section lie lias read several papers, and agriculture is 
a topic on which he can discourse ably and interestingly by the hour. 
Farming, says Mr. Banks, as a science is still in its infancy, and the 
results which will follow from a general adoption of the improved 
methods now advocated will increase the economic wealth of the country 
astonishingly, and farming will really become what it has long been 
proclaimed as the solid basic industry of America. Mr. Banks main- 
tains that agriculture will be an integral part of instruction in every 
school. 

lie is president of the First State Bank, which has a capital of 
$25,000 and $8,000 surplus, and its stockholders are all well-known 
citizens in this section of Indiana. Besides his farming and banking 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 493 

business he is also interested in real estate and has transacted a number 
of important deals in Lake County. 

Mr. Banks married Clara Chandler, who was born in Vermont, but 
was brought to Ross Township in Lake County when a child. They 
have four children, all daughters. The oldest daughter married J. M. 
Sholl, who died, leaving live children. The other married daughter is 
the wife of Dr. John W. Iddings, of Lowell, Indiana, and they have 
five children. The other two daughters, who are both at home, are 
Carrie and Florence. 

Mr. Banks has long been identified with the Grand Army of the 
Republic and also with the Masonic order. Until about three years 
ago his home was on his farm, about two miles out of town, but he then 
built a bungalow and moved into the Town of Hobart. He is secretary 
of the Farmers Mutual Insurance Company, covering fire and lightning 
insurance, with headquarters at Hobart, and all its business limited to 
Lake County. Its policies outstanding and covering the property of 
the county amount to about four million dollars in insurance. Mr. 
Banks is a republican in politics. 

It is a matter of both personal and civic pride to Mr. Banks that the 
first rural free delivery route in the West was started from Hobart, 
and it was he who took the lead in getting that experiment tried. The 
first gravel road in Lake County had Hobart as its terminal point, and 
extended from there to the waters of Lake Michigan, a distance of 
eleven miles. This improved highway became a factor in rural free 
delivery proposition, since a good highway was almost essential to the 
success of delivery of mail in the country districts. Mr. Banks got up 
the petition applying for a rural route, wrote to Congressman Crum- 
packer, and as a result the postoffice department elected Hobart as its 
point of experiment in this part of the country. In 1897 Mr. Banks 
also was chiefly instrumental in having the plan of free transportation 
for public school children first given a practical trial in Indiana at 
Hobart. As a result of his correspondence with the state superin- 
tendent, who said that Mr. Banks not only had the right, but it was 
his duty to have facilities for the children to get to school, a vehicle 
was provided to bring in the children living along one road to the 
Hobart schools, and this experiment was one of those preliminary 
to a broad application of the plan, now in use to a greater or less extent 
in nearly every Indiana county. At the present time five busses travel 
the roads running out of Hobart and bring in the children from the 
country every morning and return them to their homes at night. The 
schools of Hobart Township were the first in Lake County to float a 
United States flag over the schoolhouses. 

Northern State Bank. Samuel J. Watson. The finest bank build- 
ing the Lake County is occupied by the Northern State Bank of Gary. 
This handsome structure was completed in March, 1913, and affords 
ample facilities for an institution which has been growing and pros- 
pering steadily from its foundation. The Northern State Bank was 
organized by Samuel J. Watson and his friends, and opened for busi- 
ness on July 1, 1909. Mr. Watson was the first and is still president, 
Harry Watson and II. H. Harries, vice presidents and W. D. Hunter, 
cashier. The bank started with seventeen or more stockholders, and its 
original capital was $50,000. In 1911 its stock was increased to $100,000, 



494 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

and the prosperity and patronage of the bank are well indicated by 
recent figures for deposits, which aggregated more than a third of a 
million dollars. The bank was located at 581 Broadway until its pres- 
ent home was completed. 

Samuel J. Watson, president of the Northern State Bank, has had 
a progressive and successful business career. Born in Pennsylvania in 
1877, he graduated from Princeton University in 1899, and is an example 
of the college man who has made good in the commercial world. For 
eight years following his graduation he was in the milling business in 
Chicago, and became treasurer of the Star and Crescent Milling Com- 
pany of that city. In 1909 he came to Gary, and was one of the men 
who were in at the foundation of the modern industrial city. Mr. Wat- 
son has a wife and four children, and is one of the leading men, both in 
business and ciyic affairs at Gary. He affiliates with the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks and belongs to the University Club. 

William Charles Belman. There are several reasons which justify 
brief mention of Mr. Belman 's name and career in any history including 
the City of Hammond. In the first place, he was upwards of twenty 
years superintendent of the local schools, and it was under his direction 
and largely as a result of his work that the admirable school system was 
first organized and put on an effective basis. For many years Mr. Belman 
has been best known to the citizens of Hammond as a banker, and as 
cashier of the First National Bank has handled the funds and looked 
after the patronage of the largest financial institution in Lake County. 
In various other ways he has always been active as a citizen and business 
man, and is one of the enterprising leaders in local affairs. 

William Charles Belman was born in Detroit, Michigan, May 1, 1860. 
William Fletcher Belman, his father, was a harness manufacturer of 
Detroit. The maiden name of the mother was Matilda Sabine. Mr. Bel- 
man received his early education in the public schools of Michigan, and 
later attended the Valparaiso College at Valparaiso, Indiana. His early 
career was all devoted to educational work, and for two years he was 
principal of the schools at Lowell, in Lake County, and for eighteen years 
was superintendent of schools at Hammond. When Mr. Belman took 
charge of the Hammond schools in 1883, all the schools were conducted 
in one building, the staff of instructors comprised five teachers, and there 
were two hundred pupils. Before he gave up his work eighteen years 
later, the Hammond school system had attained the proportions of a 
large community, and he had the supervision of half a dozen school build- 
ings, a large staff of teachers, and looked after the educational welfare 
of several thousand pupils. In 1901, after leaving school work, Mr. Bel- 
man was made cashier of the First National Bank of Hammond, and has 
since held that office with credit and to the entire satisfaction of the 
stockholders and general public. Mr. Belman was also one of the organiz- 
ers and secretary and treasurer of the Lake County Savings and Trust 
Company. Since 1888 he has been president of the Hammond Building, 
Loan and Savings Association, an institution which he was also instru- 
mental in organizing. In church affairs Mr. Belman has long been promi- 
nent in the Hammond Methodist Church and has done a great deal of 
work as a member of the official board. His fraternal affiliations are 
with the Masonic order, the Knights of Pythias, the Royal League, the 
National Union, and he was one of the organizers of the Hammond 
Chamber of Commerce. Mr. Belman 's first wife was Nettie E. Smith, 





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LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 495 

and after her death he married Emma L. Rork, who is also deceased and 
who was the mother of his only living child, Creighton Rork Belman, now 
a student in school. Mr. Belman 's present wife was Sarah Starr, who 
for many years was active in school work and was identified with the 
Hammond schools before her marriage. 

I 

John W. Call. Some of Indiana's oldest stock is represented in the 
new industrial City of Gary, and perhaps the best example is John W. 
Call, who succeeded Mayor Knotts as postmaster in 1908, and is now 
serving in his second term in that office. Mr. Call belongs to a family 
which has been identified with Indiana for more than seventy-five years, 
and he came from the thriving industrial City of Elwood in Madison 
County to join in the development and assist the progress of the wonder- 
ful community along the lake shore in northern Lake County. 

John W. Call was born in Madison County, Indiana, March 17, 1847. 
His parents, John and Mary Call, who came from North Carolina, settled 
in Madison County in 1837. That was in the good old log cabin days, 
when all kinds of game was to be had at the expense of very little effort 
on the part of the hunter, and frequently deer and other animals could 
be trapped on the doorway of a settler's home. The senior Call was in 
his time and locality somewhat of a nimrod, and was noted for his skill 
as a hunter. John W. Call was reared in Madison County, received an 
education in the pioneer public schools, and also attended a seminary at 
Marion. Mr. Call has the distinction of being one of the youngest sur- 
vivors of the great war of the '60s, having volunteered in 1865, when 
eighteen years old, and serving for several months in Company I of 
the One Hundred and Fifty-fourth Indiana Regiment. He received an 
honorable discharge from military service, and after returning to Madi- 
son County spent about eighteen years more or less closely engaged in 
educational work. At the same time he spent his summers clerking in 
a drug store and in other occupations, and from 1874 to 1877 was pro- 
prietor of a drug establishment of his own. During his long residence 
at Elwood he devoted his attention to farming, to trading in livestock, 
and was the possessor of a first class country home in Madison County. 
His residence at Elwood covered a period of about twenty years. From 
that city he moved to Gary in 1907, only a few months after building 
operations had begun on an important scale. In a short time Mr. Call 
was made street, inspector, and in 1908 was appointed postmaster. In 
1912 he was again chosen for the same office, and his present term ex- 
pires in 1916. During his residence in Elwood Mr. Call served as city 
commissioner for eight years, and was also city judge for two years, and 
mayor for two years. 

On December 29, 1870, Mr. Call married Minerva McMahon, of 
Elwood, and of a prominent old family in that section of the state. Mr. 
Call and wife had three sons and one daughter, one son being deceased. 
He has been a republican in politics ever since easting his first vote for 
General Grant in 1868, and his wife is a member of the Methodist Church. 
As postmaster of Gary, Mr. Call has had to supervise an office and a 
business which has been growing so rapidly that its facilities never were 
at any time equal to the demand. He has maintained an excellent organ- 
ization, and in many ways has made the postal service a benefit to the 
local business community. Several of the recent extensions of the postal 
service have been introduced since Mr. Call took the Gary office, includ- 



496 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

ing parcels post, the postal savings bank, and at the same time the general 
volume of business has shown a remarkable increase. 

Victor K. Roberts. Both the law and business have furnished the 
field of successful effort for Mr. Roberts at Lowell, and though a young 
man he has succeeded in building up the largest insurance business in 
that city, has a substantial practice as a lawyer, and in other ways has 
made himself a factor in local affairs. 

Victor K. Roberts was born in Wayne County, Illinois, November 
6, 1886. Reared on a farm, with a country school education up to the 
time he was seventeen, he afterwards spent three years in Valparaiso 
University, one year in the preparatory course, and in June, 1910, 
graduated from the law department. Mr. Roberts has since been 
admitted to the state and federal courts, and was engaged in practice 
at Lowell in partnership with J. Will Belshaw until August, 1912, at 
which date he moved across the street and opened an office for himself. 
The legal business entrusted to his charge has always been performed 
with an ability and skill that has rapidly increased his reputation as a 
lawyer, and he is one of the successful younger members of the Lake 
County Bar. He has a complete new law library. 

In March, 1911, Mr. Roberts was appointed treasurer of the town- 
ship to fill an unexpired term of Harry Johnson, and in the following 
November was elected without opposition and was unopposed at the 
second election. On September 15, 1909, occurred his marriage with 
Bessie Mae Love, of Lowell. Mrs. Roberts was educated in the Lowell 
High School and after taking the teacher's course at Valparaiso, taught 
school three years in her native town. They are the parents of one 
son, Victor John, born September 26, 1913. Mr. Roberts has affiliations 
with Colfax Lodge No. 378, A. F. & A. M., of which he is secretary, and 
his church is the Methodist. He is fond of outdoor life, finds his recrea- 
tion is fishing, hunting and motoring, and also supervises the operations 
of two farms in Lake County. 

C. E. Nichols. With the returning of C. E. Nichols to Lowell in 
1891, an element of strength and purpose was added to the upbuilding 
forces of this prosperous community. He had gained broad experience 
in the marts of trade and commerce and among the forceful business 
men of Chicago, and his advent in Lowell marked the beginning of a 
career that has brought him steadily to the forefront among the men 
whose activities have contributed to the city's importance as a business 
center and whose high aims and purposes have maintained a supremacy 
of public-spirited citizenship. At this time he is head of the grain 
elevator firm of C. E. Nichols & Company and vice president of the 
Lowell National Bank, and also has large interests at Cook, where he 
is president of the Nichols Grain and Hay Company. 

Mr. Nichols was born on a farm one mile west of Lowell. Lake 
County, Indiana. December 14, 1861, and is a son of Horatio R and 
Eliza (Keriyon) Nichols. His father, a native of New York, was born 
in January, 1818, and moved to Lake County as a pioneer in 1836, with 
his brother Abram, and with the exception of two years spent in 
Michigan this continued to be his home until his death in April, 1897. 
Mr. Nichols passed his life in the pursuits of agriculture and is remem- 
bered as a man of industry and sound integrity. Mrs. Nichols was born 
January 3, 1826, in Rhode Island, and made the trip to the West with 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 497 



m$m 



her parents when ten years of age, and after spending two years in 
Ohio the family came to Lake County, in 1838, among the earliest 
pioneers. 

C. E. Nichols was a lad of seven years when the family moved from 
the farm into the town of Lowell, and there he attended the public 
schools until eighteen years of age. At that time he entered the grain 
business with his father, but two years later established the firm of 
Nichols Brothers, which continued in business until 1886. Seeking a 
broader field for the display of his abilities, Mr. Nichols then went to 
Chicago, where he entered the grain and commission business with the 
lirin of Stinchfield, Head & Company, but in 1887 moved to Crown 
Point, Indiana, and remained in the grain trade until the fall of 1890. 
He then returned to Chicago and entered the commission business on his 
own account, becoming a member of the Board of Trade, where he was 
constantly engaged in large transactions. Too close application to 
business and continued mental strain caused Mr. Nichols' health to 
fail, and, disposing of his interests in Chicago, in 1891, he returned to 
Lowell and formed the firm of C. E. Nichols & Company, of which he 
has continued to be the directing head. This concern has two elevators, 
with a capacity. of 75,000 bushels, and a large grist mill in which are 
manufactured wmole wheat flour and buckwheat flour. For some years 
he has been identified with financial matters, and is at present vice 
president of the Lowell National Bank. His fine business talents have 
been recognized by his election to the presidency of the Business Men's 
Association of Lowell, in which capacity he is contributing materially 
to the commercial and industrial welfare of the city. As a citizen he 
has ever shown himself eager to advance movements for the civic wel- 
fare, and has served capably as a member of the Board of Education. 
At Cook, Indiana, Mr. Nichols is president of the Nichols Grain and 
Hay Company, which also handles live stock and all kinds of building 
materials, the business extending throughout both townships. Mr. 
Nichols is a business man of superior qualifications and abounding 
energy, and has the capacity for the able supervision of a large variety 
of details. His associates have the utmost confidence in his ability, 
and he is widely and favorably known in trade circles in Chicago. 

On June 25, 1888, Mr. Nichols was married to Miss Edna Smith, of 
Hammond, who was educated in that city and for a time was a teacher 
in the public schools. One daughter has been born to this union : Stella, 
w r ho married Harvey Hildebrant, of Lowell. Mr. Nichols is a Mason, 
belonging to Colfax Lodge No. 378, and a Pythian Knight, and also 
holds membership in the Hammond Country Club and the Chicago 
Automobile Club. He has served as vice president of the National 
Hay Dealers Association and is a member of the National Grain Dealers 
Association. His political support is given to the republican party, 
but he has had no desire for preferment in the public arena. 

Henry P. Downey. For more than thirty-five years the name Dow- 
ney has had special significance in the Calumet region and particularly 
at' Hammond in connection with contracting work. The late Peter 
Downey and his son Henry P. Downey have been more or less closely 
identified with brick manufacturing, paving construction, and other 
lines of contracting in Chicago and in northern Indiana for nearly half 
a century. Henry P. Downey is now at the head of the Downey & 
Portz Construction Company of Hammond. His has been a varied and 



498 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

busy career and one that has taken him to a number of different states, 
and his substantial position as a business man goes without question. 

Henry P. Downey was born in Chicago, August 15, 1864, a son of 
Peter and Mary (McGuigan) Downey. Mrs. Peter Downey is now 
living in Hammond at the age of seventy-seven. The late Peter Downey 
followed contracting and manufacturing the greater part of his career, 
and it is an interesting fact that he had the contract for the first sweep- 
ing of streets in Chicago in 1862. In 1877 he moved to Hammond, 
almost at the beginning of that town, and lived there until his death 
in November, 1892. His work was chiefly in the manufacture of brick 
and in farming. 

Henry P. Downey was fairly well educated, graduating from the 
Hessville schools in 1878, and soon afterwards he started out to make 
his own way. Seven years were spent in Colorado, in railroading, 
hotel work and mining. With a somewhat eventful experience he 
returned to Chicago in 1889, and later became foreman under his father 
in the contracting business. In 1910 Mr. Downey established at Ham- 
mond the Downey & Portz Construction Company, and this has been 
developed into a large and efficient organization for the construction 
of roads and streets and also the handling of coal and building sup- 
plies. In Lake county the firm has built over fifty miles of improved 
highways, macadam, asphalt and other type of construction, and have 
fulfilled contracts amounting to about $200,000 in asphalt street and 
brick paving and curbing. Mr. Downey has contributed to the develop- 
ment of his home city in the construction of the Downey building, con- 
taining six flats and two stores, and his residence, erected in 1911, is 
one of the most attractive homes of the city. His interests also extend 
to rural life, and he owns and operates a stock farm near Crown Point. 

Mr. Downey is affiliated with the Knights of Columbus, the Catholic 
Order of Foresters, and the All Saints church. He was married in 
1893 to Miss Susan McLaughlin, of Saxon, Lake, county. Their three 
children are named Mary, Gertrude and Henry P., Jr., the latter a 
student at Notre Dame, Indiana. 

Thomas Arnott. Thrown upon his own resources at the age of six 
years, working at the hardest kind of manual labor when still but a 
child, sailing for fourteen years in the English Nav}', coming to the 
United States and gradually establishing himself in a paying business 
enterprise only to see the labor of years swept away by misfortune, and 
finally winning well-deserved success through constant perseverance — 
such, in outline, has been the career of Thomas Arnott, now one of 
Lowell's substantial business men. It would lie impossible to enumerate 
in a review of this nature the vicissitudes of a long and eventful life 
such as has been led by Mr. Arnott ; it must suffice to give only the 
salient points and to show how he has brought himself from obscurity 
and humble circumstances to recognized position and financial inde- 
pendence. 

Mr. Arnott was born at Rochester, Kent, near the City of London, 
Pnigland, November 28, 1847, and became self-supporting when but six 
years of age. When he was nine years old he came to the United States 
alone, and for three years worked at various occupations in Chicago, 
then returning to London, where he apprenticed himself to the up- 
holsterer's trade, working thereat in London for five and one-half years. 



V ■ ■' '■: " 




LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 499 

He next found employment at the Chatham dock yards, at Kent, and 
while there was solicited to enter the English Navy as admiral's joiner, 
a capacity in which he remained in the service for a period of fourteen 
years, during which time he visited nearly every port of importance in 
the world. In 1S79 he again came to the United States and located in 
Chicago, where for six months he worked at the Palmer House, and 
then engaged in business on Jackson Boulevard, on the present site of 
the Great Northern Hotel, with the firm of Seargant, Howard & Com- 
pany. Mr. Arnott bought the business of this firm and conducted it 
until 1882, when the building was torn down, and then removed to 226 
South Clark Street, where he remained for two and one-half years. 
His next venture was in the hotel business, in which he was engaged for 
nine years with a fair measure of success, when he disposed of his in- 
terests and came to the vicinity of Lowell, the next year being passed 
in operating a rented farm. Succeeding this he returned to Illinois 
and superintended the management of a farm until 1908, when he 
came to Lowell and engaged in repairing furniture, in a store 9x30 
feet, which stood on the present site of his handsome establishment. 
Through enterprise, ability and honorable dealing he was able to build 
up an excellent business, and had a stock worth some seven thousand 
dollars, when his place of business was destroyed by fire, and he was 
able to recover but $1,000 insurance. He refused to claim exemption 
from his debts which are now almost entirely liquidated, and he now 
has a thriving and steadily-growing business, with one of the most com- 
plete lines of furniture, carpets, etc., in the county. He occupies a store 
of three stories, and attracts a representative trade from all over this 
part of the county. In Mr. Arnott 's career there may be found the 
lesson that perseverance, determination and indomitable courage in the 
face of misfortune will eventually win success if combined with good 
management and business ability. No inheritance of wealth was his, 
no kindly influences shaped his career. At all times he has known the 
value of hard work, and the success which has come to him is but the 
just reward for a lifetime of earnest endeavor. 

Mr. Arnott was married first in 1867 to Miss Elizabeth Rule, of 
New Brompton, England, who died in 1879, having been the mother 
of two children : George, now forty-six years, and Harriet, aged forty- 
two, both married and with families, and residents of England. His 
second marriage occurred in 1884, when he was united with Mary J. 
Bruckman, of Hanover Township, Lake County, Indiana, who was edu- 
cated in the schools of that locality. Mrs. Arnott is a member of the 
Catholic Church, while Mr. Arnott is a member of the Methodist Church. 
In political matters he takes an independent attitude, preferring to 
use his own discretion as to the fitness of the candidates for public 
service. 

William H. Gostlin, Sr., is one of the pioneer builders of 
the modern Hammond. His home has been in this city since 1882, 
at which time Hammond comprised one chief industrial plant, and a 
small village of homes and stores grouped about that central establish- 
ment. Mr. Gostlin was for years engaged in manufacturing lines, and 
for the past twenty-five years has been one of the most active m promot- 
ing the varied developments of this industrial city and is a member of 
the largest real estate firm in Lake County. 



500 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

William H. Gostlin was born December 25, 1852, on a farm near 
Brockville, Canada, being the youngest of the six children of Thomas 
and Sarah (Kerr) Gostlin. In 1863 the family moved to the vicinity 
of Wadsworth, Ohio, where he attended school. At the age of seven- 
teen, in 1869, he moved to Chicago, and subsequently became identified 
with the distillery business in that city, and continued in that line until 
1879. In that year Congress passed a law favorable to vinegar makers, 
as a result of which Mr. Gostlin became engaged in the manufacture of 
vinegar, and was the first manufacturer of vinegar under the new law. 
The following year he established at Crystal Lake, Illinois, the largest 
vinegar factory of that time. His relations with the business continued 
until April, 1882, when he disposed of his interests to J. J. Wilson. 

From Crystal Lake Mr. Gostlin immediately came to Hammond, 
where in company with the late M. M. Towle he erected the M. M. Towle 
Distilling & Syrup Plant, being the second industry located in the 
Calumet region. After the burning of the factory in 1887 Mr. Gostlin 
went into the dredging business, and for two j^ears was one of the con- 
tractors in the dredging of the grounds of the World's Fair in Chicago, 
and also for two years used his organization in the construction of the 
Chicago Drainage Canal. 

In the meantime Mr. Gostlin had begun the real estate activities 
which have since taken the greater part of his time and energies. In 
1888 he had laid out two subdivisions, known as Gostlin 's First and 
Second additions, and in 1890 became head of the firm of Gostlin, War- 
ren & Webb, which laid out Homewood, a tract of 110 acres, and River- 
side, containing twenty acres. In one year this firm built forty houses 
in Riverside. In the Homewood addition the buildings were restricted 
to the erection of residences at a certain fixed cost, on 50-foot lots, and 
neither business blocks nor schoolhouses were allowed in that district. 
Mr. Gostlin 's home on Hohman Street, facing Harrison Park, is located 
in this addition and is one of the many fine residences in Hammond. 

In 1902 the real estate firm of Gostlin, Meyn & Company was organ- 
ized, and in 1905 it was incorporated with a capital stock of $100,000. 
In 1913 the capital stock was increased to $300,000. The first officers 
were: William H. Gostlin, president; A. Murray Turner, vice presi- 
dent; Peter W. Meyn, secretary and treasurer. Through the activities 
of Mr. Gostlin, together with those of the other members of the firm, 
this company has been the most important medium of real estate transac- 
tions in Hammond, and through its large resources has undertaken 
many important improvements. It has done much to beautify the city, 
has planted many trees in the parks and along Hohman Street, and 
a few years ago sold at a sacrifice the parks on Hohman Street to the 
city, thus giving this growing industrial center some open places which 
will always be appreciated by the people. 

In 1913 Mr. Gostlin retired from active business, and Mr. Meyn 
was elected president of the company. Politically Mr. Gostlin is a 
stanch republican, and was one of the first six councilmen of the corpora- 
tion of the city. He served as state senator from 1895 to 1899, and for 
eight years was postmaster of Hammond, 1904 to 1912. He also was the 
first president of the Hammond Commercial Club. Fraternally Mr. 
Gostlin is a charter member of the Masonic order and the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks at Hammond, and a charter member of 
the Hammond Country Club. In 1875 he married Mary A. Hyslop, of 





■ ^/, O uy-uXy 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 



501 



Chicago. Their only son, William Harvey Gostlin, is now secretary of 
Gostlin, Meyn & Company. 

William H. Gostlin, Jr. Possessing in no small measure the busi- 
ness ability and judgment characteristic of his father, W. H. Gostlin, 
Jr., is one of the young business leaders in Hammond, and secretary 
of Gostlin, Meyn & Company, the largest real estate firm in Lake 
County. 

William H. Gostlin, Jr., was born November 7, 1879, in Chicago, and 
was brought to Hammond by his parents three years later. After com- 
pleting the course of study in the Hammond High School he entered 
Wabash College, was a student in that classic Indiana institution three 
years, and on leaving college entered the employ of the Hammond Ele- 
vator Company, with which he was connected as cashier for five years. 
The following two years were spent as cashier and in the advertising 
department of the Lake County Times. In 1909 Mr. Gostlin became 
associated with Gostlin, Meyn & Company, and on the reorganiza- 
tion of the business in 1913 was chosen secretary of the company, while 
his father, so long its active president, took the position of treasurer. 

Mr. Gostlin was married, September 3, 1908, to Nelle S. Ingraham, 
of Brooklyn, New York. Their home has been blessed by the birth of 
two children: Florence Ingraham Gostlin and Mary Hyslop Gostlin. 
Mr. Gostlin is a member of the Hammond Country Club and of the 
Hammond Commercial Club, and has fraternal affiliations with the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He and his wife are members 
of the Presbyterian Church. 

William A. Stout. In the commercial directory of Hammond the 
name George P. Stout & Son has had a place for a number of years, 
and in supplying the trade with coal and building materials it has a 
record of progressive success, based upon prompt and reliable service, 
and this has been the chief factor in the growth of the enterprise, rather 
than any of the more showy but superficial methods of getting business. 

William A. Stout, who is the junior member of the firm, was for a 
number of years on the road as a traveling salesman, and had several 
responsible commercial relations before engaging in his present busi- 
ness. He was born at Chester, Ohio, on Christmas Day of 1871, a son 
of George P. and Sarah E. Stout. His father has lived in Hammond 
for a number of years, and established the business which is now con- 
ducted under his name and, that of his son. William A. Stout after 
attending the public schools went on the road as a traveling salesman, 
followed that line for ten years, and has had his home in Lake County 
since 1905. For the first two years he was employed as storekeeper by 
the American Steel Foundry Company at Indiana Harbor, and for 
about five years was auditor of the National Car Line Company of Chi- 
cago. In 1911 he joined hands with his father in the coal, wood and 
building material trade and with the vigor of his youth and his broad 
experience has kept the business growing rapidly until it is now one 
of the largest concerns of its kind in Hammond. 

William A. Stout was married June 25, 1895, to Elizabeth Elrod of 
Orleans, Indiana, daughter of John 0. Elrod, a farmer in that com- 
munity. They have three children, Harold E., Helen M. and William 
Kenneth. Mr. Stout and family worship in the Presbyterian Church, 



502 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

of which he is a trustee, and he belongs to the Hammond Commercial 
Club and the Country Club. 

Straube Pjano Company. The industrial Hammond is a vital, 
vigorous community, constantly growing and expanding its own re- 
sources and reaching out for new capital and affording every encour- 
agement to new industries. The exceptional position and advantages 
of the city have appealed to a number of concerns established and 
prosperous in other localities, and one of the most important converts 
of this kind is the Straube Piano Company, which has had a continuous 
and successful business history of more than thirty-five years, and for 
the past ten years has been located at Hammond. 

The Straube Piano Company, manufacturing the well known Straube 
and Hammond pianos and player pianos, was established in 1878 with 
office at Chicago and plant at Downers Grove, Illinois. The founder of 
the business was William Straube of Chicago. In 1897 the company 
was incorporated with a capital stock of $25,000, and William Straube 
as its president. The removal to Hammond was effected in 1904, and 
a three-story brick building was erected as its plant, furnishing 31,000 
square feet of factory space. At the present time the plant has been 
enlarged to 55,000 square feet of factory space, and the capital has 
been increased to $250,000. The output of this industry is an average 
of twelve complete pianos every day of the year, and the quality of 
durable and accurate mechanical construction, of tone and general ex- 
cellence which characterized the early instruments have always been 
maintained and improved from year to year, and among pianos and 
player pianos the Straube has no superior and few equals. 

The Straube Piano Company is a splendid asset to the industrial 
prosperity of Hammond. Its plant occupies five acres of ground, there 
are about one hundred and fifty employees, and every year more than 
a hundred and twenty-five thousand dollars are paid out in wages to its 
many skilled workmen. The product goes into every state of the Union 
and the business is now more prosperous than ever before. The presi- 
dent of the company is E. R. Jacobson ; Charles H. J. Thorby is vice 
president and treasurer, and James F. Jacobson is secretary. 

Edmond A. Gilson, M. D. A worthy representative of the medical 
profession of Hammond is Dr. Edmond A. Gilson. who though in prac- 
tice here only five years has dignified his calling by his earnest efforts 
and has won a reputation among a large clientage and stands high 
among his professional associates. 

Edmond A. Gilson was born in Elyria, Ohio, a son of A. S. and Dora 
L. Gilson. As a boy he had an education in the Monroe ville public 
schools of Ohio but when the ordinary opportunities of training had 
been exhausted, it was left to his own initiative and labor to pay his 
way and get a higher education. Through his own work he paid his 
way for three years in Dennison University, and had several lines of 
business experience before getting access to his chosen calling. He was 
a traveling salesman four years, and for a similar time was in the rail- 
way mail service, a business which allowed him some leisure intervals, 
which he employed in the study of medicine. Dr. Gilson was grad- 
uated medical doctor from the medical department of the Toledo Uni- 
versity in 1905, and first set up in private practice at Toledo, after one 
year moving to Covington, Indiana, and three and a half years later to 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 503 

Hammond in July, 1909. Besides his general practice he has been 
especially successful in obstetrics. Dr. Gilson is a member of the Lake 
County Medical Society, and the Tenth District and the Indiana State 
Medical Associations. Fraternally his relations are with the Masonic 
Order and the Knights of Pythias, while his church is the Methodist. 
He is also a member of the Hammond Chamber of Commerce. In 1895 
Dr. Gilson married Jessie Evans of Granville, Ohio. Their two chil- 
dren are Edwin Russell and Margaret Olive. 

Michael P. Warnimont. One of the most capable and successful 
of the automobile men of Lake County is Michael P. Warnimont, who 
conducts a modern and complete garage and automobile storage at 
Hammond, and also operates repair shops. Mr. Warnimont is a ma- 
chinist by trade, an expert in his line, and his popularity and prom- 
inence in automobile circles is steadily increasing. 

Michael P. Warnimont was born in 1878 at Chicago, Illinois, a son 
of Peter M. and Mary Anna Warnimont, his father an engineer by 
trade. After completing his education in the public schools, he spent 
eight years in learning and working at the trade of machinist in his 
native city. In 1898 Mr. Warnimont moved to Hammond and was 
employed in machine shops, and in 1910 was foreman for F. L. Heintz 
in an automobile storage and repair shop and factory for the making 
of automobile tires. In 1911 Mr. Warnimont opened an automobile 
garage and repair shop, and has space for the storage of thirty cars. 
He was married in 1911 to Nellie May Smith of Wilkesbarre, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Hammond Pattern and Model Works. One of the important 
industries of Hammond is the Hammond Pattern and Model Works, a 
business which owes its origin and standing in commercial circles to the 
energy and ability of its proprietors, Howarth & Kirk. The company 
was organized in 1913 by William Howarth and E. A. Kirk. They 
have a large shop on Lyman Avenue and the Nickel Plate Railway, 
and have all the facilities for the making of metal patterns and jobbing 
work in metal and also handle a large amount of carpenter business. 
William Howarth came to Hammond in 1903 to become foreman in the 
pattern department of the Stewart Machine Company and continued 
with that institution until he and Mr. Kirk in 1913 bought the model 
and pattern department of the older company, and reorganized it under 
its present name. While the business is young, it is growing, and both 
proprietors are men of broad experience and their judgment can be 
trusted to enlarge the industry as rapidly as conditions will justify. 
At the present time about five workmen are employed in the shops. 

William Howarth is a native of England, and was trained to his 
special line of business in that country. He was born October 20, 1867, 
and came to America in 1899. For several years he was employed in 
large shops in and about Chicago, and for the past eleven years has 
been a resident of Hammond. 

Mr. Howarth was married in England to Edith Quayle. Their five 
children are William, Jr., Jennie, Beatrice, Alfred and Lillian. Mr. 
Howarth affiliated with the Knights of Pythias, the Royal League and 
is past president and has served as a delegate to conventions of the 
order of Sons of St. George. He was vice chancellor of the Knights of 
Pythias Lodge at Burnside, Illinois. 



504 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

Marcus M. Towle. On September 6, 1910, death took away the man 
who was properly called "the founder of Hammond and the man who 
made more history in the Calumet region than any other." Only to 
men of unusual character and ability are given the distinction and the 
high personal esteem paid to the late Marcus M. Towle. With a talent 
for large business enterprise, he united a capacity for winning popular 
esteem, and few persons in Hammond did not know and admire the late 
Mr. Towle. His career was one of the fine features of local citizenship 
from the beginning of the city, and his life lent more to the splendid 
industrial city than that of any other resident. Something of the career 
of this man, and Ins original genius and remarkable activities, will have 
an appropriate place in the history of Lake County and the Calumet 
region. 

A briefly summarized description of his place in local affairs and 
also in relation to a great modern industry was couched in the following 
words by a local newspaper at the time of his death: "M. M. Towle, 
who had more to do with the building up of the great Calumet district 
in Indiana than any other person, who is credited with founding the 
dressed beef packing industry of the United States which since has 
resulted in the development of such concerns as the National Packing 
Company, the Armour and Swift companies, and what now constitutes 
the so-called beef trust, and who has the distinction of being the founder 
of the cities of Hammond and East Chicago, died yesterday at the age of 
sixty-nine years. ' ' 

The activities of the late Mr. Towle were so many and varied that 
they may be briefly stated as they were given in a newspaper at the time 
of his death, as follows : Founded the dressed beef packing industry of 
the United States; founded the City of Hammond and did more than 
any other man to build it up ; furnished Jacob Forsythe with the money 
to carry out General Torrence's scheme for building the City of East 
Chicago; incorporated, financed and built the Calumet Terminal Rail- 
road ; dredged the Calumet River and built docks in Hammond ; organized 
the First National Bank of Hammond; was Hammond's first mayor and 
first postmaster, serving in the latter office seventeen years ; built the 
Hammond corn syrup works, which afterwards burned ; built the Ham- 
mond buggy works; built the Hammond Milling Company on the site 
of the Simplex Railway Appliance Company; built the Lakeside nail 
mills, one of his several unfortunate investments; built three skating 
rinks, all of which burned ; built what was then known as the Western 
Indiana Railroad from the state line to the Corning steel plant in Ham- 
mond ; at one time was practically the owner of Hammond and owned 
more of the city than any other person ; financed and built a railroad in 
Canada, a losing enterprise; and laid out Oak Hill Cemetery, the first 
in Hammond. 

Marcus M. Towle was born at Danville, New Hampshire, January 12, 
1841, and was in his seventieth year when he died. In 1854 the family 
moved to Haverhill, Massachusetts, where he finished his limited educa- 
tion. His father's name was Amos G. Towle. AVhen his father died the 
boy was given employment in the abattoir at Brighton, Massachusetts, 
and learned the many practical details of the butchering business, which 
gave him his initial push in life. At the age of twenty-four he came to 
Detroit, Michigan, and went into butchering on his own account. It is 
said that in the earlv years of his business he carried his meats about 



ISIlll- 




LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 505 

the streets in a cart, and cut it off for individual customers according 
to the size and quality wanted. 

The story of how he originated the shipping of meats in a refrigerated 
state is difficult to tell in all its details, but the general facts are about 
as follows : It was in the years immediately following the war, 1865, that 
Mr. Towle located in Detroit, and at that time the Middle West was 
supplying the Eastern cities with their fresh beef, which was sent in 
stock cars on the hoof, and only salt cured products were shipped in any 
other way. Mr. Towle recognized the great advantage and economy 
which would be effected by a means which would enable him to send 
dressed beef to the market, and he worked out and experimented upon a 
scheme which would keep the beef in prime condition during its long 
shipment from Detroit to Boston and other Eastern cities. In his small 
slaughter house at Detroit he would kill his cattle brought in from Chi- 
cago, dress them, and after sprinkling the carcasses with cracked ice, 
would ship a load to Boston. At the same time George H. Hammond 
was running a little meat market in Detroit, and became interested in 
Towle 's experiment. It was he who suggested the enlargement of the 
scheme by the addition of more capital. They interested Caleb Ives, a 
Detroit banker and lumberman, who eventually furnished $15,000 to 
finance an enterprise for dressing and packing beef in the vicinity of 
Chicago. In 1869, when Mr. Towle, G. H. Hammond and Caleb Ives 
arrived in Chicago, they hired a rig and started to drive along the Calu- 
met River in search of a site for the plant. The Michigan Central Rail- 
road was then the only line through Hammond. Upon the arrival of 
the party of Detroit promoters at the point where the Michigan Central 
Railroad ran close to the Calumet River they remained at the Hohman 
residence during the night. The next day they decided to locate what 
was to be known as the G. H. Hammond Company at that place. The 
origin of the name of the present city, however, was somewhat later. The 
locality at that time was known as ' ' State Line. ' ' Mr. Towle was made 
the first postmaster, and it soon was discovered that much confusion 
arose in the direction of mail to State Line, Illinois, and State Line, 
Indiana, the confusion being to the greater disadvantage of the Indiana 
town, since the Illinois postoffice was much older. In consequence, Mr. 
Towle caused the name of the office to be changed to Hammond. 

With the joint capital of the promoters a small plant was built and 
cattle shipped from the Chicago stock yards was killed and dressed, and 
after being packed in ice was sent on to the cities of the East. The inven- 
tion of the first practical type of the modern refrigerator car came about 
this time, and was due to the genius of a man named Davis. The estab- 
lishment of so extensive a plant at Hammond was an event in the meat- 
packing industry of that town as well as of the entire country, and 
naturally attracted the attention of Mr. Davis, who was seeking a means 
of employing his patents. Instead of putting the ice on the meat, as 
Towle had been doing, the invention of Davis provided for a car within 
a ear, which made possible a great saving in ice and the more convenient 
handling of the beef. After some negotiation, Towle became convinced 
of the superiority of the Davis car, and an agreement was made by 
which the new car was to be used by the G. H. Hammond Company on a 
royalty basis. With the subsequent gigantic development and strides 
taken in the beef packing and exporting business this article has nothing 
to do. Mr. Towle at the end of a few years sold out his interest in the 



506 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

Hammond paekery, but he deserves credit for having tried the industry 
through its initial stages and made practicable what was before crudely 
experimental. 

From the beef packing business Mr. Towle realized what was a fair 
fortune, and thereafter interested himself in a number of promotion 
enterprises, in some of which he was successful and in others met with 
reverses. 

His connection with the founding of East Chicago is a matter of 
special interest to this history. The story as told in a local newspaper 
was as follows: "Jacob Forsythe owned several thousand acres of land 
where the City of East Chicago is now located. General Torrence had a 
scheme for the building of a city on Forsythe 's land. M. M. Towle had 
the money with which to carry out the scheme. So with Forsythe 's 
land, Torrence 's scheme and Towle 's money the City of of East Chicago 
was formed. Towle himself attended to the incorporation of the town. 
General Torrence is generally given the credit for the founding of East 
Chicago, but it was Towle 's money and his ability as a promoter which 
resulted in the carrying out of the scheme. ' ' 

It would be difficult if not impossible to enumerate the different ways 
in which Mr. Towle contributed to and supported the prosperity and 
advancement of Hammond. He built many of the new structures that 
were the first improvements of the town site, besides furnishing capital 
for many original industries. He was the founder and for some years 
president of the First National Bank in Hammond, and many later 
citizens knew him best as a banker. While his business record is perhaps 
the most conspicuous feature of his career, there is also a personal side 
to it which is worthy of note. One of his old-time business associates at 
the time of his death said : ' ' The death of Towle is a personal loss to me. 
He was not only the founder but the builder of Hammond. Without 
Towle, Hammond would never have been the city it is. He was the friend 
of hundreds of people in Hammond who never went to him in need and 
found his purse closed. ' ' Another phase of his character is indicated in 
the following words from an editorial estimate : ' ' He was a loyal friend 
and a vindictive enemy ; charitable to a fault ; of rather gruff exterior, 
he was so good of heart that he was never known to refuse anyone whom 
he knew to be in trouble, in times of sickness and death and unusual 
afflictions. Many who now live in Hammond can testify to the kind 
sympathy and substantial assistance they received from Marcus M. 
Towle. " 

He is also said to be responsible for bringing to Hammond many of 
the most prominent citizens and interesting them in the prosperity and 
growth of the city. He was always loyal to everything connected with 
this city, and whenever an industry was to be secured by bonus 
Mr. Towle 's name would head the list with thousands. Fraternally he 
was prominent in Masonry, having taken thirty-two degrees in the 
Scottish Rite, and was a charter member and the first master of the Blue 
Lodge No. 117, A. F. & A. M. 

On December 5, 1866, Mr. Towle married Miss Irena Dow, of Detroit. 
Six children were born, three daughters and three sons. The three 
daughters died in infancy, and their mother passed away suddenly on 
September 8, 1905. The sons are : Marcus Morton Towle, Jr., a brief 
sketch of whom follows ; George "H. Towle, who lives in Hammond ; and 
Fred C. Towle, of Chicago. 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 507 

Marcus Morton Towle, Jr. Now serving as assistant cashier of the 
First National Bank of Hammond, of which institution his father was the 
founder and for a number of years president, Marcus Morton Towle, Jr., 
was born at Hammond, Indiana, June 9, 1876. In many ways he has 
proved himself to possess the same qualities of business character and 
sagacity which marked his father, and is one of the young business and 
civic leaders of Hammond. 

After a public school education, supplemented with a course in the 
Bryant & Stratton Business College, in Chicago, he found a place as clerk 
with the Simplex Steel Company, and later was employed by the Ameri- 
can Steel and Wire Company at Worcester, Massachusetts. Returning 
to Hammond in 1900, he entered his father's bank, the First National, 
was made receiving teller, and for a number of years has been assistant 
cashier. 

Mr. Towle is secretary of the Oak Hill Cemetery Association and is 
president of the Young Men's Christian Association of Hammond. He is 
also a member of the Chamber of Commerce and affiliates with the 
Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and 
the Royal League. Active in the affairs of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, of which he is trustee, he was at one time secretary of the 
official board of the church, and is president of the Methodist Episcopal 
Brotherhood. All his time is divided between his bank, his church and 
his home. In the Methodist Church of Hammond he has placed a beauti- 
ful memorial window in honor of his mother, and a fine pipe organ in the 
name of his late honored father. 

On December 25, 1898, Mr. Towle married Matilda Gehrke, a daughter 
of John F. and Sophia (Reese) Gehrke, her father being a retired farmer 
of Hammond. 

Fred Lukmann. The rapid growth of the automobile interests of 
the country in recent years has created an industry which has given 
a wide field of opportunity and enterprise to many of the young men 
of the present generation, who have a predilection for mechanics. To 
Fred Lukmann, of Hammond, belongs the distinction of having entered 
the business in its infancy, and he drove into Hammond the second 
automobile ever on the streets of that city, and built a machine in his 
own shop in 1901. He is thus a pioneer man in the business, and his 
name and business have long been familiar to automobile owners in 
that locality. 

A native of Germany, Fred Lukmann was born June 3, 1868, a son 
of Fred and Sophia (Freund) Lukmann. His father was a millwright 
by trade, emigrated to America in 1885, located at Medaryville, Indi- 
ana, and after that spent the rest of his active career as a farmer. 
His prosperity enabled him to spend his later years in retirement in 
the city of Lafayette, where he died. 

Fred Lukmann attended the public schools in Germany, spent three 
years as an apprentice at the trade of machinist in the old country, 
and when he came to this country at the age of seventeen was well 
equipped to earn his own way and make a place for himself in the 
world of affairs. His employment began as a stationary engineer, and 
he was engineer for the electric light company and for the fire depart- 
ment of the city and was the first paid engineer on the paid department, 
serving four and a half years. After that followed service as an engi- 



508 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

neer for the South Shore Gas and Electric Company, and for three years 
he was with the Morgan Electric Company of East Chicago. After a 
similar time spent with the Hammond Ice Company, Mr. Lukmann 
engaged in the automobile business, and in his own shop assembled a 
machine in 1901, the year in which automobiles were made by the 
dozen where now they are made by the thousand. He subsequently 
erected at Calumet avenue and the Nickel Plate Railway tracks a 
splendid garage and repair shops, with thirty-three hundred square 
feet of floor space and storage for twenty-five cars. That is now his 
business headquarters and in his shops he employs three repair men 
throughout the year. He also operates an automobile livery, and is 
agent, for the Detroiter Car in Hammond and vicinity. 

Mr. Lukmann is a charter member of the Knights of the Maccabees, 
having joined that order twenty-two years ago. He also is affiliated 
with the Catholic Order of Foresters, and became a member of St. 
Joseph's parish twenty-three years ago. Mr. Lukmann married Mary 
Stephan, who was born in Indiana. Their three children were Dora, 
Fred and Sylvester. Mrs. Lukmann died December 12, 1907, and on 
November 10, 1909, he was united in marriage with Catherine Grantges, 
who was born in Missouri. They have one child, Herbert Francis. 

Eben N. Bunnell. Concerning the career of E. N. Bunnell, of 
Hammond, it can be truthfully said that "he has lived while he has 
lived." Into a lifetime of less than forty years he has crowded the 
activities and the accomplishments which many men twice his age would 
consider the scope of a normal career. Mr. Bunnell is one of the 
later comers to Hammond, where in business circles he is known as 
proprietor of a special sales agency for all store and office supplies and 
fixtures, and as local representative and distributor for the Ford Motor 
Company. As a salesman Mr. Bunnell's record for business getting 
has been almost unexcelled in his particular field, and in the intervals 
of an excessively active lifetime he has had considerable military expe- 
rience, and is a veteran of the Spanish-American war. 

Eben N. Bunnell was born May 17, 1875, at Canfield, Ohio. His 
parents were Ira H. and Elizabeth (Hiveley) Bunnell. His father 
was a harness manufacturer and held the office of justice of the peace 
in his community. With a public school education, Eben N. Bunnell 
had his first experience as a grocery clerk. From the age of eighteen 
to twenty-eight he spent in travel as a salesman for specialties, and for 
fourteen years represented the National Cash Register Company. His 
vigorous and effective work for this company advanced him to the 
position of assistant district sales manager, and from 1910 to 1913 he 
was the world's leader in sales, having a greater average of business 
than any other one of the hundreds of representatives in all parts of 
the world of that company. He won several district prizes for his 
salesmanship. In 1909 Mr. Bunnell took the management of the Ham- 
mond agency, which included Lake county and part of Cook county, 
and on March 1, 1914, took the agency for the Ford Motor Company 
in Lake county, and at that time established the Bunnell Storage and 
Warehouse. He now has a prosperous and well-established business 
and is regarded as one of the leading men in this city. 

While in Ohio Mr. Bunnell became interested in military matters, 
and served as a private with the Logan Rifles of the Ohio State Militia 
and early in 1898, after the breaking out of the Spanish-American 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 509 

war, he enlisted in Company A of the Tenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 
and was advanced from private to corporal. After the war his com- 
pany was organized as the First Battalion of Engineers, known as the 
Cleveland Grays, and he became first lieutenant of the organization. 
Mr. Bunnell has membership in the Spanish-American War Veterans, 
is a member of the Hammond Chamber of Commerce, was a charter 
member of the Country Club, and has taken thirty-two degrees in 
Masonry and belongs to the Mystic Shrine. -In 1902 at Cleveland h< j 
married Frank Mears, of that city. They have two children, Elizabeth 
Standard and Standard Hiveley. 

John F. Reilly. A successful Hammond lawyer and former news- 
paper man, John F. Reilly has a prominent part in local affairs, both 
through his profession and through his civic and social activities. 

Born in Newark, New Jersey, a son of Garrett and Julia (Fitz- 
simmous) Reilly, his father having been superintendent and general 
manager of a masons' and builders' supply house, John F. Reilly at- 
tended the Christian Brothers School at Newark, engaged in newspaper 
work in New York, Chicago, Kansas City, St. Joseph, Missouri, and 
other cities, and altogether spent about fifteen years as a newspaper 
man. His studies for the law were pursued in the Valparaiso Uni- 
versity, and after graduating he located in Hammond in 1905 and has 
since enjoyed the success of an able lawyer. 

Mr. Reilly is serving as trustee and treasurer of the Indiana State 
School for the Deaf, having been appointed to that office January 1, 
1913, by the then Governor Marshall, now vice-president of the United 
States. Another distinction of Mr. Reilly 's is that he perfected and 
brought into prominence the "Big Brothers Movement" under the 
auspices of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. Mr. Reilly 
is chairman of the committee of the Grand Lodge that has charge of 
this movement, which is one of the most practical forms of benevolent 
work ever undertaken. Mr. Reilly is a member of the Chamber of 
Commerce, the Country Club of Hammond, affiliates with the Knights 
of Columbus, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Royal 
League, the Catholic Order of Foresters, and has membership in the 
County, State and American Bar Associations. Prominent in Demo- 
cratic circles, he belongs to the Jefferson Club of Hammond and the 
Indiana Democratic Club at Indianapolis. Mr. Reilly married Mary 
G. Alfred of Leavenworth, Kansas. He and his wife are members of 
the All Saints church. 

Leonard Knoerzer. One of Lake county's native sons who lias 
taken a conspicuous part in the industrial affairs of the Calumet region 
is Leonard Knoerzer, secretary of the 0. K. Champion Potato Machinery 
Company of Hammond. This is one of the large and important indus- 
tries of the city, has about two hundred thousand dollars invested in 
the plant, which covers four acres of ground, and its yearly pay roll 
of about fifty thousand dollars is distributed among sixty employees. 
For a number of years Mr. Knoerzer was a traveling man, at one time 
was engaged in the manufacture of cigars at Hammond, and then he- 
came associated with his brother as one of the executives of the present 
large factory. 

Leonard Knoerzer was born in Lake county, Indiana. November 30. 



510 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

1867. With a public school education, he first took up photographic 
work, and for three years traveled, selling goods in the western terri- 
tory. After ten years as a cigar manufacturer at Hammond he joined 
his brother Otto, who had previously established the 0. K. Champion 
Potato Machinery Company. Besides his relations with this local indus- 
try, Mr. Knoerzer is also a director of the United Boiler Heating and 
Foundry Company, and is president of the Canadian Potato Machinery 
Company at Gault, Ontario. 

A man of social qualities, Mr. Knoerzer has a place among the influ- 
ential business men of Hammond and is well known throughout the 
Calumet region. He is a member of the Hammond Chamber of Com- 
merce and of the Country Club, belongs to the Catholic Benevolent 
League and the Catholic Order of Foresters, also to the Illinois Travel- 
ing Men's Association, and he and his family worship in St. Joseph's 
Catholic church. In September, 1896, he married Katherine Horst, 
daughter of Edward and Marie Horst, of Hammond. Their two chil- 
dren are Arthur and Cecelia. 

Champion Potato Machinery Company of Hammond. The emi- 
nence of Hammond among the industrial centers of the middle west 
has been due to the presence there of a group of men possessed of 
remarkable genius as manufacturers and of fine capabilities as organ- 
izers and business builders. Out of the inventive and business genius 
of Otto Knoerzer has been developed one of the city's best known 
industries, the Champion Potato Machinery Company. 

In 1897 Mr. Otto Knoerzer, who was then in the blacksmith and 
implement business, constructed the first K Champion Potato Digger. 
The next few years were spent in perfecting the machine, and on Feb- 
ruary 1, 1902, Otto and Leonard Knoerzer formed a partnership, under 
the name Champion Potato Machinery Company, for the manufacture 
of the K Champion Diggers and Planters on a larger scale. The 
subsequent rapid growth of the business surpassed all the most san- 
guine anticipation of its founders, who soon found that limited capital 
would not enable them to expand and keep up with the normal increase 
of the business. Consequently on January 13, 1903, the Champion 
Potato Machinery Company was incorporated. Its first directors were 
Otto Knoerzer. Leonard Knoerzer, Anton H. Tapper, George Drackert, 
Peter W. Meyn, William Krudup and LeGrand T. Meyer. The first 
executive officers were : Otto Knoerzer, president ; Leonard Knoerzer, 
secretary ; LeGrand T. Meyer, vice-president ; Anton II. Tapper, 
treasurer. 

In a brief time the little factory where the first machinery was con- 
structed was entirely inadequate, and in 1904 the ground and factory 
buildings of the defunct Mackey Steel Tube Works were purchased. 
In 1905 the present machine shop, 60x125 feet, was built; in 1906 the 
foundry, 60x96 feet; in 1908 the two-story factory, 128x150 feet; and 
during 1914 a warehouse. 88x127 feet and three stories, is in course 
of construction. All of the buildings are of concrete and steel, and 
were designed, supervised and built under the immediate personal 
supervision of Mr. Otto Knoerzer. The original grounds were increased 
in 1908 by purchase of more land to the amount of four acres, and 
of this one and three-quarters acres are covered with the various build- 
ings. A little more than ten years ago, when the company was manu- 




L^^tx^/ pi/- Jz&^fr^rz^t^z- 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 511 

facturing a few hundred machines a year, the employees averaged ahout 
eight men, while the working force at the present time is sixty, and 
the company pays out about fifty thousand dollars every year in wages. 

The machinery has won its reputation as a result of practical value 
to potato growers in every state of the country, and with this increasing 
reputation has come a gradual expansion of trade beyond the borders 
of the United States. While most of the machinery has been sold in 
the United States, the foreign trade is rapidly growing, and some of 
the diggers and planters are now found in practically every civilized 
country where potatoes are an important crop. The company has also 
incorporated and has a factory in Canada. 

The presefit officers of the Champion Potato Machinery Company 
are : Otto Knoerzer, president ; A. M. Turner, vice-president ; Leonard 
Knoerzer, secretary; and Anton H. Tapper, treasurer. 

While by far the greatest amount of capital and likewise most of 
the men now prominent in manufacturing and business affairs of the 
Calumet region have been attracted to this district because of its superb 
advantages, the Champion Potato Machinery Company is in several 
ways a distinctively Lake county product, and Otto Knoerzer, its 
originator and president, was born on a farm in Lake county, August 
24, 1865. His family were among the early settlers of Lake county, 
and his parents, John Leonard and Augusta (Hoemichen) Knoerzer, 
came to America in 1848, and after a year spent in Chicago located on 
a farm in Lake county. The father was born in February, 1811, and 
died in 1893. 

Otto Knoerzer had a public school education in some of the early 
schools of Lake county, and from the farm graduated into his regular 
vocation as a blacksmith and implement dealer at Hammond. Mr. 
Knoerzer possesses not only the capable hands but also the original 
mind, and the combination of these resulted in the perfection of the 
first potato digger, and from that has come by successive stages the 
industry of which he is now the head. He is also vice-president and 
treasurer of the Canadian Champion Potato Machinery Company, 
operating a plant in Gault, Ontario. Mr. Knoerzer is vice-president of 
the Calumet Building and Loan Association, and in recent years has 
taken an influential part in inducing new capital to invest in Hammond 
and in expanding the scope of the city's industrial activities. 

He is an active member and a director of the Hammond Chamber 
of Commerce, belongs to the Hammond Country Club, is affiliated with 
the Knights of Columbus and the Catholic Order of Foresters, and his 
church home is St. Joseph's Catholic church. Mr. Knoerzer owns the 
brick block on Hohman street, one of the modern store and office build- 
ings, 60x109 feet and two stories, constructed of pressed brick. 

By his marriage to Katie Bick, daughter of Casper and Anna Bick 
of Hammond, he has four children : Mary, George, Anna and Leo. 

Ernst W. Hohman. The early history and development of the City 
of Hammond will always give memorial to the name and career of the 
late Ernst W. Hohman, who was the first settler and possessor of a large 
part of the lands on which the city has grown, and whose enterprise 
and that of his family have been vital factors in the progressive pros- 
perity of that community. The chief thoroughfare of the city is Hohman 
avenue, yet that is only one of many distinctive marks left by the 



512 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

activities of this pioneer family on the city. The history of Hammond 
as a city told on other pages of this publication has frequent reference 
to the Hohmans, and at this point it will be appropriate to give some 
brief outline of the family itself. 

Ernst W. Hohman was born in Koenigsberg, Prussia, September 5, 
1817. He came of good family, was highly educated, and represented 
the best stock of the German nation. For some reason, probably on 
account of his affiliations with the revolutionary party during the '40s, 
he left Prussia and established a home in England. In London he 
met and gained the love of Caroline Sibley, who was born in Wales and 
reared in London, and on July 9, 1849, the couple were married in the 
City of London. A few days after their marriage they set sail for 
America, arriving on this side of the Atlantic August 20, 1849, and after 
a short residence in New York City, went west to Chicago. Ernst W. 
Hohman, who was a tailor by trade, opened a shop at the corner of 
La Salle and Randolph streets in Chicago, and lived there about two 
years. From Chicago he moved to the Calumet River on April 1, 1851, 
and his was the first family to locate where the City of Hammond now 
stands. His first purchase of land was forty acres, and by later pur- 
chases he acquired nearly a thousand acres in that immediate locality. 
In that part of the country the Hohman house was known to all travelers 
around the bend of Lake Michigan, and supplied entertainment to hun- 
dreds who crossed the Calumet at that point as one of the early taverns. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Hohman were people of exceptional education and 
native refinement. While Ernst W Hohman spoke several languages 
fluently, his wife was unacquainted with the German, and the conver- 
sation of the household was usually carried on in French. 

Ernst W. Hohman died December 18, 1873. while his wife passed 
away at Kingston, Ontario, Canada, June 15, 1900, and both now rest 
in the Oak Hill Cemetery in Hammond. The late Caroline Hohman 
had a very distinctive place in Hammond social circles not only as 
the pioneer woman resident, but for her many excellences of heart and 
mind, and for a number of years she capably managed the property even 
during her husband's lifetime. When G. H. Hammond and M. M. Towle 
came to the Calumet in 1869 to look out a site for a packing plant, they 
recognized the advantage of the Hohman land and willingly paid one 
hundred dollars an acre for twenty acres of land that was then little 
more than a swamp. After her husband's death Mrs. Hohman managed 
the affairs of the estate, and a large part of it is still undivided, and 
is regarded as one of the richest properties in Lake County. Mrs. Hoh- 
man gave the site for St. Joseph's Church, a lot 100x125 feet at the 
corner of Hohman and Russell streets. 

For many years Mrs. Caroline Hohman kept a diary, and recently 
when the Hammond Woman's Club celebrated "History Day" the most 
interesting contribution to the program was a paper compiled from 
this diary, and for its essential historic interest a brief abstract of that 
paper is reproduced. 

The first date in the diary was in April, 1851, and told of the buy- 
ing by Mr. Ernst Hohman of the forty acres with its six-room log house 
on the north of the Calumet River. It told of his bringing his bride to 
this little home and of the many hardships endured and the homesickness 
of the twenty-year-old girl for her friends in Paris and London. It 
recited the enthusiastic belief of Mr. Hohman for a great future of 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 513 

this section of the state, and the felling of the trees of the forest and 
the selling of these and the investment of all his money in more lands; 
of a trip to Crown Point over the corduroy road that Mr. Hohman had 
assisted in building; of a visit to the home of Indians who were on 
their way to visit their burial ground on the south bank of the Calu- 
met; of Mr. Hohman 's building the Hohman bridge across the river 
just south of their home. Also is mentioned the visit of the Michigan 
Central Railway officials for the purpose of purchasing right of way to 
extend their line to Chicago. Then came a story of a visit in a fine car- 
riage of two gentlemen from Detroit — George H. Hammond and 
M. M. Towle, who were looking for a site for a slaughter house. These 
gentlemen claimed that with the location of that plant would come 
eighteen men and their families, and then schools could be started for 
the children, who were then forced to go many miles to Crown Point or 
to Chicago, and also that with the coming of the plant the railroad 
would be forced to stop its trains at the State Line slaughtering house. 
Another interesting visitor, mentioned in the diary, was Stephen A. 
Douglas, who spent several days as a guest in the Hohman house, and 
on departing gave his young hostess a handsome brooch for her kind- 
ness in entertaining traveling strangers. At another place was told the 
advent of Mrs. Hohman 's sister, Mrs. Sohl and her husband, and later 
of the coming of Thomas Hammond and the Gostlins. At a party given 
by the Gostlins Mr. Hammond refused to allow his children to go be- 
cause the Gostlin home was half a mile down Hohman road and the 
way was very dark and the entire section infested by undesirable char- 
acters. During the war of 1861-65 Mr. Hohman, on account of ill health 
sent a substitute. Through the diary at different points was told a 
record of buying and selling of land, and the entire diary is one of the 
most valuable original documents in the history of Hammond. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hohman had six children : Mrs. Ottilia Johnson ; Charles G., of 
Hammond; Louis E., of Tulsa, Oklahoma; Agnes H., wife of Benjamin 
Bell, of Hammond; Emma, now Mrs. F. R. Mott; and Lena, wife of 
Dr. T. E. Bell, of Hammond. 

Charles G. Hohman, who is now active manager of the extensive Hoh- 
man estate, was born in Hammond, or in the locality which has since 
acquired that name, June 9, 1857. Educated in such schools as were 
convenient during his youth, he lived at home on the farm until he was 
twenty years of age, and then went to Chicago and engaged in a busi- 
ness career as clerk in a grocery store. In 1878 he bought a livery stable 
in that city, and that was his chief enterprise there until 1900. In 
that year he returned to Hammond and has since looked after the 
Hohman estate. 

Mr. Hohman first married Ella Hatch. They were married in Engle- 
wood and Miss Hatch had been a resident of Chicago. By this marriage 
were born two children, Gertrude, who married W. M. King, of Los 
Angeles, California, and Harry, who died at the age of twenty-two years. 
After her death Mr. Hohman was married at Toronto, Canada, in 1903, 
to Christina J. Jones. Their two children are Caroline and Ruth. 
Mr. Hohman and family worship in St. Paul's Episcopal Church, in 
which he is a vestryman. He has membership in the Hammond Country 
Club and the Chamber of Commerce. 

Charles May McDaniel. The present superintendent of the Ham- 
mond public schools, an office which he has held since 1905, is a school 



514 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

man who has heen active in his work in Indiana about thirty years, is 
an experienced educator, with practical and progressive ideals, and 
keenly alive to the needs of modern education, and possessed of the 
ability to make the school serve its proper end in the scheme of a 
twentieth-century society. The profession of the educator was never 
more important than at the present time, and it is the fortune of men 
like Mr. McDaniel to contribute no small share in the training of a 
new generation for the responsibilities of the coming years. 

In his article descriptive of the work of the Hammond schools con- 
tributed to the recent educational report of Lake county schools, Super- 
intendent McDaniel said: "Hammond is an industrial community. 
It has more than fifty factories, representing almost every line of activ- 
ity. A boy or girl who may be dissatisfied with school conditions needs 
to use little persuasion with his parents to get their permission to go 
to work, especially when they receive from five dollars to twelve dollars 
per week. When the parents see so little in the school of immediate 
value, their decision for industrial activities can be appreciated. 

"So far as possible to adapt the school work of the common public 
schools to the industrial needs of Hammond, preserving at the same 
time such essentials of the traditional work as might be thought best, 
has been the sole aim of the school authorities. In crystallizing a work- 
able program there is no claim for anything absolutely new, rather a 
unifying of some things that have been done in different school sys- 
tems. "We do not want to be understood to announce that the cur- 
ricula of the grades and the high school have been fully adapted to 
the general scheme that is rapidly developing. The fact is that much 
especially in the grades needs to be changed, eliminating some lines of 
work and correlating others." 

Under Superintendent McDaniel a number of modifications and im- 
provements have been introduced into the local school system. German 
is being taught in the grades, and one of the most recent features was 
the establishment of night schools, beginning in September, 1912. An 
employment bureau has been organized to assist students in securing 
work after leaving school. The schools have a full equipment of manual 
training, domestic science and shop facilities, and a scheme for co- 
operative school and shop work has been planned. At the same time 
full commercial courses are offered to the students of the public schools. 
With these agencies the school work has been so planned as to afford 
proper guidance for the choice of vocations, with fundamental training 
in elementary industrial work beginning in the grades. 

Charles May McDaniel is a native of Indiana, born at the old social 
and educational center of Crawfordsville, August 28, 1863. His 
parents were Owen W. and Katherine McDaniel, his father a harness 
maker by trade. Prom the public schools Mr. McDaniel entered AVabash 
College at Crawfordsville, and has degrees of Bachelor of Science and 
Master of Arts from that institution. During his long career as an 
educator he has taken additional courses dui-ing the summers at the 
University of Chicago and in the Winona Lake School. 

Mr. McDaniel 's first experience as teacher was near Crawfordsville, 
at the West schoolhouse, and his career includes one year at Newtown, 
principal of the Portland schools four years, at Edinburg one year, 
four years as principal and nine years as superintendent of the Madi- 
son public schools, and in 1905 he came to Hammond to take up his 
duties as superintendent. 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 515 

Mr. McDaniel is one of the best known educators in the state of 
Indiana, and has many relations with educational bodies. He is a 
trustee of Wabash College, his Alma Mater, is a member of the State 
Teachers' Association, the Northern Indiana Teachers' Association, of 
which he is an ex-president, is ex-president of the Southern Indiana 
Teachers' Association, former president of the Town and City Teach- 
ers' Association, and former chairman of the executive committee of 
the State Teachers' Association. For three years Mr. McDaniel was 
principal of the Winona Lake summer school. Other professional 
affiliations are with the Northern Indiana Superintendents' Club, the 
Town and City Superintendents' Association of Indiana, the National 
Teachers' Association, the National Society for the Study of Education. 
He is a member and first vice-president of the Hammond Chamber of 
Commerce and belongs to the Country Club of that city. His fraternal 
associations include the Knight Templar degrees of Masonry, also mem- 
bership in the Mystic Shrine, and in the Knights of Pythias and the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. A member of the Board of Deacons 
in the Christian church, he has for several years been a teacher of the 
young people's Bible class. 

At Crawfordsville on December 31, 1889, Mr. McDaniel married 
Margaret M. Blair. Their three children are Wellie May, Paul Wallace, 
and Ruth Louise. 

William Bilker. The junior member of the enterprising firm of 
Bieker Bros. Company of Hammond is a practical business man who 
about twenty years ago joined his brother in selling goods to this com- 
munity, and by concentrating his efforts along one line has already 
found the success which is the ambition of every normal man. 

Representing one of the older families of Lake county, William 
Bieker was born on a farm July 10, 1873, a son of William and Tracie 
Bieker. The country schools supplied his early training, and he de- 
veloped strength of constitution by exercise in the various duties of the 
home farm until he was twenty-one. Coming to Hammond in 1894, he 
worked as a teamster for a year or so, and in 1896 joined his brother 
Henry in a feed and grain store. Their united efforts have kept this 
business growing, and later they began trading in builders' materials, 
coal and wood, and other supplies. They now have one yard at 257 
Hohman street, another at 144 Sibley street, and one at the inter- 
section of the Erie railroad and Douglas street. 

William Bieker is a member of the Hammond Chamber of Com- 
merce, belongs to the Knights of Columbus and he and his family 
worship in St. Joseph's church. Mr. Bieker was married at St. John, 
in Lake county, June 18, 1904, to Johanna Austgen. Their five chil- 
dren are: Lawrence William, Herbert N., Arthur J., Alma Genevieve, 
and EdAvard G. 

Ignatius F. Mankowski. It is not only as city clerk of West Ham- 
mond since the organization of that city that Ignatius F. Mankowski 
is known to the community, but he has for a number of years been 
known as a substantial young business man, and his record is one 
which well justifies the public responsibilities and honors which have 
been accorded him. 

Ignatius F. Mankowski was born in Chicago, November 10, 1886, a 
son of Ignatius and Mary Mankowski, both of whom were natives of 



516 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

Germany and emigrated to America in 1881. The parents lived in 
Chicago until 1892, then moved to Hammond, and the father, who is 
now sixty-four years of age, has had a long and successful career as a 
contractor and builder. The city clerk of West Hammond grew up 
in Hammond, attended the public and parochial schools, and also had 
training in a business college. His first regular employment was as a 
butcher in the local packing house, followed by two years as a farm 
hand, and he then became associated with his father in the general con- 
tracting and house-moving business. In the meantime he learned the 
trade of bricklaying, and that gave him the qualifications for setting 
up an independent business as a contractor. 

His entrance into official life came with his election as village clerk 
of West Hammond in 1910. When the village was incorporated as a 
city about a year later, he was made city clerk, and has held that office 
to the present time. He is also secretary of the board of local im- 
provements, and holds that office by virtue of his place as city clerk. 
He is also acting city comptroller, and is serving as legal adviser to 
King John III Sobieski No. 1 Building and Loan Association of West 
Hammond. 

In addition to his other interests, Mr. Mankowski has an office and 
handles real estate and insurance, his headquarters being at 147 One 
Hundred and Fifty-fourth place. He has for ten years had membership 
in the Roman Catholic Union of America, belongs to the Polish Na- 
tional Alliance, the Polish Vulcans, the White Eagles Pleasure Club, 
the third degree of the Knights of Columbus, and he and his family 
worship in St. Andrew's church. On January 27, 1907, at West Ham- 
mond he married Mary Sankey. Their three children are : Joseph 
Edward, Raymond and Florence. 

Lake County Savings and Trust Company. In the remarkable 
growth and development which have attended all lines of business in 
the Calumet district during the twentieth century, few financial insti- 
tutions have shown a better record than the Lake County Savings and 
Trust Company, which was organized at Hammond in October, 1902. 
This company was the logical outgrowth of the personal business which 
for a number of years had been conducted by Peter W. Meyn, and 
which had grown to such proportions that Mr. Meyn deemed it wise 
to form a bank in order that his customers might be given the benefit 
of increased capital and more perfect service. 

The Lake County Savings and Trust Company resumed business 
under that title and under its charter on January 1, 1903. The initial 
deposits were two hundred and fifty thousand dollars, and the first 
officers and directors were: Peter W. Meyn, president; Frank Hess, 
vice-president; W. C. Belman, secretary-treasurer; and the directors: 
Peter W. Meyn, A. M. Turner, Frank Hess, W. C. Belman, E. C. 
Minas, John N. Beckman and E. Ullrich. 

The banking business was continued in the former office of Peter 
W. Meyn at 92 State street from January, 1903, until July, 1910. In 
the meantime the quarters had become entirely inadequate for a bank 
of such magnitude, and with such important relations with the commu- 
nity, and through a fortunate chain of circumstances the company was 
enabled to procure two rooms on the southeast corner of State and 
Hohman streets. These rooms were remodeled and made into a 
spacious and convenient banking home. But as the business continued 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 517 

to thrive and prosper at the new location, it was soon outgrown, and 
in August, 1913, the directors found it necessary to increase the space 
and accommodations and by careful planning enlarged the working 
space and installed certain new fixtures and added conveniences which 
have made the banking room one of the most complete and convenient 
in the city of Hammond, and which afford an appropriate home for 
one of the leading institutions of its kind in the county. 

At the present time, after a little more than eleven years of suc- 
cessful operation, the Lake County Savings and Trust Company shows 
deposits of $575,000.00, with total assets of $735,947.30. The present 
officers and directors of the company are as follows: Peter W. Meyn, 
president; Joseph W. Weis, vice-president; W. C. Belman, secretary- 
treasurer; David T. Emery, assistant secretary-treasurer; and the 
directors are: Peter W. Meyn, J. N. Beckman, W. C. Belman, David 
T. Emery, Jos. W. Weis, A. M. Turner, Albert Maack and J. H. 
Youche. While the original capital was only $50,000, the present 
capital, surplus and undivided profits amounts to $110,000, a remark- 
able showing in the few years the bank has been in operation. 

Fred Barnett. A young Hammond lawyer who has done much to 
prove his ability and open a way for a large and successful career in 
the law, Fred Barnett has been a resident of that city for the past 
seven years, and has had several official distinctions since beginning 
practice. For the past four years he has made an exceptionally capable 
record as Police Judge of Hammond. 

Fred Barnett was born at Hallsville, in Dewitt county, Illinois, 
March 19, 1881. His parents are John I. and Mary (Kirby) Barnett, 
his father's vocation being chiefly school work. The Barnett family 
ancestors go back to Revolutionary stock in America, and one of its 
earliest members was Alexander Barnett, a well-known physician and 
surgeon in his day, and also a surgeon in the Revolutionary war. Great- 
grandfather John Barnett was a Kentuckian, who enlisted in the War 
of 1812, fought with General Jackson, and participated in the great 
battle of New Orleans early in 1815, and was mustered out shortly 
afterwards. 

Fred Barnett was educated in the public schools and the Valparaiso 
College and studied law at the Illinois College of Law in Chicago, from 
which he was graduated in 1907. In the same year he located in 
Hammond and has since devoted himself to his profession along general 
lines and has enjoyed a large practice. In November, 1909, Mr. Barnett 
was elected Police Judge, and by re-election in 1913 is still filling that 
office. He is a Democrat, and has been active in the local party since 
he came to Hammond. 

On October 29, 1907, Mr. Barnett married Edna McKinney, of 
Clinton, Illinois, a daughter of Ashley and Alice McKinney, who were 
farming people. They have two children, Muriel Alice and Paul El- 
wood. Judge Barnett and wife worship in the Christian church, and 
fraternally he has taken the Lodge, Chapter, Council and Commandery 
degrees in Masonry, and is a member of the Shrine. He is Venerable 
Consul in the Modern Woodmen of America and was delegate to the 
Head Camp of that order in 1911. He has allied himself with the 
business communitv as a member of the Chamber of Commerce. 



518 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

Edward C. Minas. The modern merchant is the man who knows what 
the people want and supplies the best facilities for meeting those wants. 
He also knows how far trade can be safely stimulated. He keeps a large 
and well selected stock, but never so long that it is out of date, and acts 
on that solid commercial principle that real success is only a return for 
an adequate service. Of merchants in the Calumet region belonging to 
this class there is no more conspicuous example that E. C. Minas of Ham- 
mond. His career is an inspiration. Twenty-four years ago he opened 
up a small and inferior stock of goods in a small room, and in the face of 
vigorous competition has built up a business which is now second to none 
in the entire Calumet district. 

The culmination of his mercantile career came in the fall of 1913 with 
the opening of Hammond's newest department store, representing an 
investment of nearly half a million dollars, and a modern three-story 
building that in size only, and not in service nor in completeness of 
appointments, is inferior to any metropolitan department store. The 
formal opening of this handsome emporium on October 16, 1913, was a 
great event in Hammond and was appropriately celebrated. Music, speak- 
ing, and a great outpouring of popular appreciation and praise of the 
organization, and especially of the man who had been chiefly responsible 
for this enterprise, E. C. Minas, president and active head of the E. C. 
Minas Company. 

A native of Lake County, and of an old family of this section, Edward 
C. Minas was born at Crown Point, October 6, 1863, a son of Michael and 
Margaret (Groh) Minas. His father was a shoe merchant and the son 
grew up in a mercantile atmosphere, but had only an ordinary educa- 
tion, and his success has been due to his individual talent and force of 
will and determination to rise superior to circumstances and establish a 
business better than those of his competitors. After attending the public 
schools he became clerk in a grocery store, and then became bookkeeper 
and cashier in M. M. Towle 's store at Hammond. 

In 1890 Mr. Minas opened a business of his own with a stock of hard- 
ware valued at less than twelve hundred dollars and in a small room at 
State Street and Oakley Avenue. His first day's sales were less than 
five dollars, but in a short time trade was attracted to his location and 
kept increasing at a more than normal rate. It is interesting to recall 
that the first delivery service was made in a wheelbarrow, while at the 
present time three automobile trucks and seven wagons deliver goods 
free within a radius of twenty miles about Hammond. The first chapter 
of the store's history was written in five years, and at the end of that 
time it had outgrown its quarters and was moved to a three-story building 
with fifty feet frontage on a portion of the ground occupied by the 
present building. Ten years later another three stories on fifty feet of 
frontage was added, and the E. C. Minas Company was incorporated as 
a general department store. The business had continued increase and 
prosperity and in 1912 preparations were made for the building of a 
store structure Avhich in equipment and possibilities of service should 
represent the latest ideas in architecture and arrangement. A study was 
made of department stores in different sections of the country, and one 
of the best architects was engaged to draw the plans. The former build- 
ing had to be remodeled to conform to the new design and present one 
architectural harmony of an entire block, and, in spite of alterations, 
business went on uninterruptedly for fully a year. The result is a per- 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 519 

feetly fireproof building, equipped with automatic sprinkling system, with 
electric elevators, a modern system of heating, lighting and ventilating, 
and many provisions for the comfort and convenience of customers, and 
also for employees. While Mr. Minas has been the mainspring in the 
development of this concern from its infancy, he has also had the faculty 
of associating with him capable subordinates, and has developed a busi- 
ness organization which represents the acme of efficiency in its per- 
sonnel. The different departments of the E. C. Minas Company store 
are in charge of separate managers or departmental heads, and each is 
responsible for the success of his line the same as if it were a separate 
business. It has been the policy of the company from the beginning to 
handle nothing but reliable merchandise, never to allow a customer to 
depart dissatisfied, to give so far as possible personal and intimate 
service, and a store motto has been ' ' the best of service, courtesy, treat- 
ment and loyalty to the store." Under its present organization more 
than two hundred employees give daily energies to making this a perfect 
service in merchandising and depend upon the institution for their own 
livelihood. The Minas store was the first in the Calumet district to intro- 
duce a profit-sharing plan whereby a portion of the profits are given to 
customers as premiums on their aggregate purchases. 

Along with success in his private business ventures, Mr. E. C. Minas 
has combined a splendid public spirit which has made him a factor in 
much of the civic improvements and municipal betterment in his home 
city, where he is looked upon as a man of the finest character and most 
useful influence. Mr. Minas is an influential member of the Chamber of 
Commerce, belongs to the Hammond Country Club, has affiliations with 
the Lodge and Scottish Rite Consistory of the Masonic order, and with 
the Mystic Shrine, with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and 
the Knights of Pythias, and is interested in all the movements under- 
taken to increase and bring about a better and greater Hammond. 

On December 27, 1893, Mr. Minas married Maude Kiefer, a daughter 
of Dr. F. P. Kiefer of Hammond. They are the parents of three children 
— Lucille, Edward Clarence and Carl Kiefer. 

William James Moran. Conducting a popular garage and operat- 
ing a taxi service in Hammond, William J. Moran has been identified 
with that city for the past thirteen or fourteen years, and has a high 
standing among local business men. 

William James Moran was born in Martinsburg, New York, August 
26, 1871, a son of Peter and Anna (Callahan) Moran. His father was 
a stone contractor. The son grew up at Lowville, New York, attended 
the public schools there, and spent five years in learning and working 
at the trade of casket trimmer. After a short time spent in managing 
his father's farm, he went with the Western Steel Car and Foundry 
Company as general foreman, and subsequently became foreman in 
the Standard Steel Car Company's shops. Mr. Moran came to the 
Calumet region in 1900, and has lived in Hammond for seven years. 
On July 20, 1913, he bought a garage at 160 Fayette street, and besides 
a storage capacity for about thirty cars operates a repair shop and 
maintains an excellent taxi service. 

Mr. Moran and wife are members of St. Joseph's church. He 
married Anna E. Ryan, of Lowville, New York, and they have one 
son, Leonard J., who is now a student in the Cincinnati Dental College. 



520 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

American Potato Machinery Company. Of the numerous Ham- 
mond industries, one of the most important in the younger generation 
is the America Potato Machinery Company, which was organized in 
January, 1912, for the manufacture of a varied line of potato machinery, 
and now has a plant covering half a dozen acres of ground, with capital 
investment of fifty thousand dollars, some thirty employees, and a pay 
roll of about fifteen thousand dollars. The original machines which 
formed the nucleus of manufacture were devised and invented by James 
Cameron and Howard C. Long. On the death of Mr. Cameron, Mr. Long 
continued making the machines and finally perfected them in their pres- 
ent efficiency. 

Since the organization and incorporation of the American company, 
its executive officers have been : George M. Eder, president ; D. W. 
Krinbill, vice-president; Frank Hammond, secretary; Harry M. John- 
son, treasurer ; and George J. Eder, general manager. The capital stock 
of the company is fifty thousand dollars, and with six acres of ground, 
the manufacturing is carried on in a large brick building, 60x200 feet. 
The output of the plant is potato planters, diggers and sorters, and the 
sale of these implements is now extended to practically every state of 
the Union, and some are sent abroad. Nearly all the employees are 
skilled workmen. 

George J. Eder. The general manager of the American Potato 
Machinery Company is a native of Lake county, a young business man 
with a broad experience in several different lines and recently admitted 
to the Indiana bar. 

George J. Eder was born at Crown Point, September 30, 1879, a 
son of George M. and Frances (Scherer) Eder. His father has long 
been prominent in Lake county as a banker and county official. The 
son received his education in the public schools and completed it at 
St. Joseph's College in Rensselaer, Indiana, where he graduated in 
1893. The next four years were spent in his father's office as deputy 
county clerk. Then for ten years he was in Chicago employed by the 
Pacific Express Company, and advanced from a wagon boy to the posi- 
tion of assistant superintendent. Returning to Hammond in 1911, he 
spent some time with the Champion Potato Machinery Company, and 
then became one of the organizers of his present concern. Mr. Eder 
was admitted to the Indiana bar in 1914. His study of law had begun 
while he was in his father's office as deputy clerk, and he improved 
his opportunities while in the legal and claim department of the express 
company at Chicago, and followed that with a course in the American 
Correspondence School of Law at Chicago. 

Mr. Eder was married in 1907 to Anna M. Hilbrich, daughter of 
Peter and Barbara (Rascher) Hilbrich of Hammond. Her father is a 
merchant of that city. The three children of their marriage are Mary 
Lillian, Genevieve and A. George. The family are members of St. 
Joseph's church. 

Isidore I. Modjeska. This well-known Hammond attorney has had 
a successful career, both in the law and in the newspaper field, and 
after being admitted to practice turned his attention to newspaper 
work and was identified with several large dailies in the middle west 
until coming to Hammond about seven years ago and taking up a prac- 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 521 

tice which has rapidly developed and given him a secure prestige as a 
member of the Lake county bar. 

Isidore I. Modjeska was born in Chicago, June 29, 1876, a son of 
Israel I. and Elizabeth Modjeska. His life has been spent in different 
localities, and his early education was acquired in the public schools 
of Pratt Center, Kansas, in Chicago, two years at the Northwestern 
high school, followed by a college career in the Lake Forest University, 
and in 1899 he graduated from the Chicago College of Law. His first 
year as a lawyer was spent in St. Joseph, Missouri, but he gave up 
his profession and took a position on the staff of the Kansas City 
Record, later was with the Omaha World, and also with the Twin City 
Journal at St. Paul, and was reporter and correspondent for a number 
of other newspapers in the middle west. Coming to Hammond in 
July, 1908, he resumed practice as a lawyer, and since January, 1913, 
has served as deputy prosecuting attorney of Lake county. 

Mr. Modjeska is a member of the Hammond Chamber of Commerce 
and the Hammond Humane Society. He is dictator in the L. O. 0. M., 
and was first trustee of Ezra Lodge, I. 0. B. A., and is a member of the 
Bethel Congregation. At Kansas City, Missouri, January 22, 1901, he 
married Florence Pearl Shless. They have one daughter, Mildred 
Sylvia. 

Golden Bros. The Golden name and enterprise has signified a 
great deal in Hammond during the last twenty-five years. As mer- 
chants, in the transfer, storage and furniture trade, and allied lines, 
father and sons have built up a business which stands for service, and 
their own prosperity is merely a reflection of the adequate work they 
have done in the community. 

The late Peter J. Golden, the father of the Golden Bros., was born 
in Oxford, Pennsylvania, and at his death on October 23. 1909, was 
sixty-four years of age. He came to Hammond in 1889, and at the 
time of his death was esteemed as one of the ablest citizens and business 
men. He was for a time engaged in the transfer and storage business, 
and at one time was proprietor of four grocery stores in the city. 
Subsequently he was employed in the G. H. Hammond Company's 
packing plant as a government meat inspector. His wife, Mrs. Emma 
Golden, who was born at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, is still living with 
her sons in Hammond. 

Levi E. Golden, the older of the two sons, was born June 10, 1876, 
at Altoona, Pennsylvania. He was about thirteen years old when the 
family moved to Hammond, had a fair share of training in the public 
schools, and as a youth got experience under his father in the grocery 
trade. Subsequently he worked for a time in the nail mills and in the 
butterine factory, but in 1897 started a transfer dray. To this, as the 
scope extended and the opportunities increased, was added a storage 
warehouse. The firm of Golden Bros, now has a large and prosperous 
biisiness employing the services of seven or eight men. In connection 
with the storage warehouse they also do a furniture business. The 
firm for five years handled all the delivery work of the Sawyer-Mc- 
Mahon Biscuit Company. 

Mr. Golden is almost as well known for his benevolent work in 
Hammond as for his business activity. He has been a leader in the 
movement for educating and uplifting the moral standard and fur- 



522 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

nishing wholesome recreation for boys and young men. He is a mem- 
ber of the Christian church, and a great deal of his time is given to 
the work of the church and its affiliated branches. He took an active 
part in organizing in Hammond the Boy Scouts of America, and is a 
teacher of the Bible Class and has organized several clubs in connection 
with the church. Mr. Golden is an outdoor man, and in his earlier days 
played baseball. 

Emory C. Golden, the junior of the firm of Golden Bros., was born 
at Amboy, Indiana, March 15, 1878. He was also educated in the 
public schools, received his first experience in the grocery store of his 
father, was a hardware clerk for a time, was an employe of the butterine 
factory, and subsequently with his brother engaged in the transfer 
business and together they have built up the fine concern now con- 
ducted under their name. 

William Thomas. A man of superior business and financial ability 
and judgment, William Thomas, of Hammond, Indiana, has long been 
actively identified with the development and promotion of the industrial 
activities of Lake County, and is widely known throughout the com- 
munity. A native of England, he was born, December 18, 1863, at 
Albright, Shropshire, a son of James and Anna Maria (Harper) Thomas, 
his father having been a prominent contractor and builder in his native 
country. 

Brought up and educated in Shropshire, Mr. Thomas determined 
while young to begin life for himself on this side of the broad Atlantic. 
Accordingly, in 1883, he came with his bride to Canada, settling first in 
Ontario, where for nine years he was connected with a supply house 
that dealt in iron, steel and provisions. He subsequently came to the 
United States and was associated with the Muskegon Foundry Company 
for a time, and then went to Chicago, where for a period of three years 
he was chief clei'k with the National Bank of the Republic. He was subse- 
quently for four years with the Cudahy Packing Company, holding a 
position of responsibility. In 1900 Mr. Thomas accepted a position with 
the Simplex Railway Appliance Company, in Hammond, Indiana, and 
six years later was made its secretary. This company was purchased 
by the American Steel Foundries, and he is now auditor for the Simplex 
works of that concern. Mr. Thomas is also secretary of the Hammond 
Manufacturers' Association and is a member of the Hammond Country 
Club. 

Mr. Thomas married, December 31, 1882, in England, Miss Alice 
Sheldon, a daughter of Henry and Emma Sheldon, and to them one child 
was born, namely, Beatrice Mignon Thomas. 

Frank D. Peest. When Hammond began growing as a manufac- 
turing center, and as one industry after another found location there, 
there were necessarily attracted a large number of men in executive 
and other positions who have since been permanently identified with 
Lake county, and have proved one of the best elements in its popu- 
lation. Among those who came at an early date, and are practically 
pioneers of the Calumet region, was Frank D. Prest, whose home has 
been in Hammond since 1880. Mr. Prest was for a number of years 
connected with the Tuthill Spring Company at Hammond, and came 
to the city along with the industry in the capacity of foreman. He 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 523 

remained there as general foreman with that industry until 1894, and 
then transferred his energies and has since been more or less closely 
identified with the insurance business. Mr. Prest served three years 
as deputy assessor for North township, and was then appointed justice 
of the peace and in 1910 elected to that office, his term expiring in 
November, 1913. 

Frank D. Prest was born at Perrysburg, Ohio, July 16, 1859, a 
son of John and Susan Prest. His father was a merchant. Mr. Prest 
received a public school education, and early in his youth went to 
Chicago and found employment with the Spring Company, which in 
1880 moved its plant to Hammond, and he went along to take the place 
of foreman. He remained with the concern until it quit business, and 
has since made himself a factor in other lines. 

In 1884 he married Adelia F. Burroughs, of Rensselaer, Indiana. 
Mrs. Prest died in 1900, and their four children are: Edith A., wife 
of Carl P. Mier, of Oak Park, Illinois ; Margaret E., a stenographer in 
the superior court of Lake county; Blanche M., at home; and George 
B., a clerk at Buffington, Indiana. The family have membership in the 
Episcopal church, and Mr. Prest affiliates with Garfield Lodge No. 
569, A. F. & A. M. 

Joseph Allen Graham, M. D. Among the active phj-sicians and 
surgeons of Hammond probably no member of the fraternity has more 
expert qualifications, had a longer or better training both in this coun- 
try and abroad previous to beginning regular practice, and none has 
been more successful in his work than Dr. Graham of Hammond. 

A native of Canada, born in Lenox-Addington, January 10, 1877, 
Joseph Allen Graham is a son of Robert and Mary (Wolf) Graham, 
his father a pharmacist. From the Kingston Collegiate Institute at 
Kingston, Ontario, Dr. Graham was graduated in 1894, and being then 
seventeen years of age introduced himself to a life somewhat adven- 
turous and followed the sea for three years. Much of his time was 
spent abroad and in Great Britain for a number of years, and after 
leaving the sea he was a student for two years in the University of 
Edinboro, and then returned to Canada and in 1904 was graduated 
M. D. and C. M. from Queen's University of Ontario. Besides the 
regular courses of school, clinic and hospital, Dr. Graham had some 
unusual opportunities. For a time he was connected with the staff 
of instruction in Queen's University, was one of the staff in London 
Hospital and the great Ormond street hospital, and took special courses 
in operative surgery in King's College. 

Dr. Graham located at Hammond in 1907, and while building up 
a large private practice and a reputation of special skill in surgery, 
he has not neglected the relations and opportunities for service to be 
found in his home city and vicinity. He is a member of the British 
Medical Society, and the Lake County and Indiana State Medical So- 
cieties. He is surgeon to St. Margaret's Hospital in Hammond, and 
much of his time has been unselfishly devoted to the unremunerated 
service of his profession. He has membership in the Hamilton Club 
of Chicago, is a Royal Arch Mason, belongs to the English Order of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and is also affiliated with the 
Knights of the Maccabees. On July 1, 1902, Dr. Graham was married 
to Amy Kathleen Marston of Canada. Their two children are Mary 



524 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

Gwendolyn and Constance Maud. The family are members of the 
Episcopal church. 

J. William Beckman. One of Hammond's business men whose 
career is a record of advancement steady and sure over all obstacles 
and with the best possible utilization of opportunities and resources is 
J. William Beckman, who is now best known to the business community 
as secretary and treasurer of the Beckman Supply Company at 265 
Michigan avenue. 

Though born in Germany, September 11, 1869, Mr. Beckman has 
lived practically all his life in America, since in 1871 his parents, Peter 
and Matilda (Weinroth) Beckman emigrated to America and first set- 
tled in Cook county, Illinois. His father was a farmer and in 1875 
transferred his home to Lake county, Indiana, and took up farming 
in the vicinity of Cedar Lake. He is now living retired at Hammond. 

J. William Beckman attended the public schools for his education, 
and began his career at Hammond as clerk in the post office for four 
years. This was followed by two years with the Griffin drug store, 
then as shipping clerk for seven years with the Tuthill Spring Com- 
pany, and after that six years as cashier with the same concern at 
Chicago; then as cashier and bookkeeper four years with Sturges & 
Burn Manufacturing Company. 

In the meantime, in 1904, Mr. Beckman had been one of the prin- 
cipal organizers and owned half the original capital stock of seven 
thousand five hundred dollars in the Beckman Supply Company. He 
was secretary and treasurer of the organization, but kept at his other 
work for several years until the company was on a fair way to pros- 
perity and required his entire attention, and then in 1909 he returned 
to Hammond and has since been closely identified with the manage- 
ment of this successful corporation. In 1911 its capital stock was 
increased to fifty thousand dollars. The Beckman Supply Company 
deals in hay, grain, flour, mill feed, brick, stone, sand, lime and cement, 
plastering materials and interior and other building specialties, handles 
coal, and its trade is one of constantly growing and profitable scope. 

Mr. Beckman stands high in the business community, is a member 
of the Hammond Chamber of Commerce and the Hammond Country 
Club, and affiliates with the Knights of the Maccabees. In 1902 he 
was married at Chicago Heights to Mary Rabe. They have one child, 
Helen Rabe Beckman, who is six years of age. 

Philipp Buettnek. A business which supplies a valued and im- 
portant service to the people of Hammond is the East Lawn Green- 
houses. Philipp Buettner, proprietor, located at 508 Michigan avenue. 
Mr. Buettner has more than thirty years of practical experience as a 
gardener and florist, has been in the business in both the east and the 
west, and there is probably not a detail of the art which has escaped him. 

Philipp Buettner is a. native of Germany, born in Bavaria, May 11, 
1859. Reared and educated in his native land, he was an emigrant 
to America in March, 1879, and the first three years were spent in work 
as a gardener on Long Island, New York. This was followed by four 
years of practical experience in the same line at Chicago, and his home 
has been in Hammond since 1885, so that he may well claim the dis- 
tinction of being an old settler. For a time Mr. Buettner was em- 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 525 

ployed in the Old Spring factory at Hammond, and then for twenty 
years was connected with M. M. Towle's floral establishment in that 
city. In 1907 Mr. Buettner established business on his own account, 
and now has three lots, each 25x100 feet, with several thousand square 
feet under glass, and devoted to a culture of the choicest varieties of 
flowers, and carries on an extensive business both in cut flowers and 
shrubs, bulbs, plants and trees. 

Mr. Buettner was married at Chicago, April 2, 1885, to Katie 
Bieser. Their five children are : George B., associated with his father 
as a florist ; Katie ; John P. ; William F. ; and Edith. Mr. Buettner 
belongs to the Baptist church, and fraternally is affiliated with the 
Knights of the Maccabees and the Royal League. 

Fred Granger. A business which has been conducted so success- 
fully as to become a familiar institution in Hammond is the Granger- 
Whitaker Company, operating a general livery and sales stables, en- 
gaged in teaming and transfer work, and employing automobiles in the 
business and handling the sale of several cars. The company is incor- 
porated with a capital stock of ten thousand dollars, and its officers are 
Fred Granger, Henry Whitaker and Giles T. Warner. 

Fred Granger, who has been identified with the citizenship of Ham- 
mond since 1906 and in his present line of business, was born in Jasper 
county, Indiana, November 14, 1876, a son of William J. and Lucy 
(McCallister) Granger. His father was a well-known lawyer of Jack- 
son county. Fred Granger had a public school education, and early 
became identified with teaming and the buying of stock, and is an 
expert judge of horses in particular. Mr. Granger is a member of the 
Hammond Commercial Club, affiliates with the Fraternal Order of 
Eagles and the Knights of Pythias and his church is the Christian. 

In June. 1902, he married Bessie Curtin, of Jasper county, daughter 
of Timothy and Kate Curtin. Her father was engaged in railway 
construction work for many years. They are the parents of five chil- 
dren: Ola, Hazel, Lee, Tony and Pauline. 

Mr. Granger is a veteran of the Philippine war, and came to Ham- 
mond after several years of service with the American army in those 
islands. He enlisted November 23, 1898, as a private in Company D 
of the Fourth United States Infantry, and soon afterwards sailed from 
New York for Manila. His service lasted for three years in the Philip- 
pines, and he had several promotions, having acted as quartermaster 
for some time, and after an honorable discharge in 1901 returned to 
America and began his business career in Hammond. 

Carl E. Bauer. One of the largest and most important industries 
located at Hammond is the Simplex Railway Appliance Company, of 
which Carl E. Bauer is manager. This business ranks as one of the 
older Hammond concerns, having been established in that city in 1898. 
The output of the Simplex Company comprises various kinds of car 
and railway appliances, and the product goes all over the United States. 
How important is its relation to the general industrial prosperity of the 
city is indicated by the fact that on its payroll are about seven hun- 
dred and fifty persons, while the annual amount paid out in wages and 
salaries is about half a million dollars. The plant occupies forty acres 
of ground, and has an investment of about a million dollars. 



526 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

Carl Edward Bauer, who is an expert mechanical engineer as well 
as a first-class business man, has been an American citizen for thirty 
years, during all of which time he has been identified with some phase of 
car manufacturing. He was born in the Village of Langenholzhausen, 
Lippe-Detmold, Germany, November 5, 1857. His parents were Ferdin- 
and E. and Minna (Bock) Bauer, who spent all their lives in the old 
country and lived to great old age. The family were prominent in their 
home community, the grandfather having been a miller and mayor of 
this village, and the father followed in the same occupation, and was 
also mayor of his town and enjoyed the complete respect and esteem 
of all his old neighbors and associates until the last. 

Carl E. Bauer, who spent his younger years in Germany, and who 
served in the cavalry branch of the regular army as a non-commissioned 
officer and later as lieutenant in the army reserve, had a technical educa- 
tion in the fine German schools, attending both the gymnasium and 
the polytechnic college. On coming to America in 1882 Mr. Bauer first 
located in Terre Haute, Indiana, and became mechanical engineer in the 
shops of the Terre Haute Car Manufacturing Company. In 1887 he 
moved to Muskegon, Michigan, and was with the Muskegon Car Com- 
pany until 1892. From that date until 1895 he was with the Indiana Car 
and Foundry Company at Indianapolis, and then spent two years with 
the Illinois Car and Equipment Company. Mr. Bauer has been identi- 
fied with the Simplex Railway Appliance Company since 1897, and came 
to Hammond when the company established its shops in that city in 
1898. As secretary of the company he had an active part in its manage- 
ment, and his thorough knowledge of practical details of manufacture has 
made him an additionally valuable asset in the successful upbuilding 
of the business. In the fall of 1913 the American Steel Foundries Com- 
pany took over the Simplex Railway Appliance Company, and since that 
time Mr. Bauer has had entire management of the Hammond works. 

In April, 1887, Mr. Bauer married Miss Olga Wittenberg, a daughter 
of Otto and Charlotte (Sachs) Wittenberg. Their children are: Wal- 
ter; Gretchen; Carl; Minnie, who died at the age of six years; Ernest, 
who died in infancy ; and Emil. Mr. Bauer affiliates with the Masons, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and Knights of Pythias, and in poli- 
tics is a republican. 

Richard Zimmermann. The business enterprise of Richard Zimmer- 
mann at Hammond as a contractor and builder is probably without ex- 
ception the largest and in the past twenty years has brought about 
more actual building construction than can be credited to any other 
man in that field. Mr. Zimmermann besides his work as a builder, has 
had a prominent part in general business affairs, is connected with 
several banks and commercial organizations, and is one of the largest 
property owners in West Hammond, and was practically one of the 
founders of that city. 

In Weigelsdorf, Kreis Minsterberg, near Breslau, Germany, Richard 
Zimmermann was born in 1862. His father, August Zimmermann, was 
a flour miller. His life up to the age of twenty-one was spent in his 
native land, and besides a training in the common schools an appren- 
ticeship of three years at the cabinetmaker's trade gave him a technical 
equipment and start on the career in which his chief success has been 
made. At the age of twenty-one in 1883, Richard Zimmermann crossed 
the ocean, landed at New York, spent four months at work at his trade 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 527 

in the east, worked for some time at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was a cabi- 
netmaker in Chicago until October, 1884, went south to New Orleans, 
returned to Chicago, and again went to New Orleans, and worked as a 
cabinetmaker and carpenter for four years in that city. In 1889, after 
these various changes and mature experience in his trade and in busi- 
ness affairs generally, Mr. Zimmermann located at Hammond, and was 
one of the early carpenters and builders in what was still a small 
town. During the first five years he did more work as a cabinetmaker 
than as a carpenter, but in 1894 established a business as contractor 
and builder in all the branches. 

Mr. Zimmermann has the distinction of having constructed the first 
house in West Hammond. During the twenty years of his relations 
as a building contractor he has put up about four hundred buildings 
of all kinds in Hammond and vicinity, and that record probably sur- 
passes that of any other builder in this section. Among the many 
structures erected by him is the First National Bank building. Mr. 
Zimmermann is vice-president and one of the organizers of the West 
Hammond Trust & Savings Bank, is vice-president and also an organizer 
of the West Hammond Building & Loan Association, and is the owner 
of the one-story building erected especially for the bank in West Ham- 
mond. Mr. Zimmermann was one of the first aldermen in the village of 
West Hammond, when the town was laid out and incorporated, in Feb- 
ruary, 1893, and served two years. When the city was incorporated 
he was again chosen a member of the council in 1912. 

At New Orleans in 1887 Mr. Zimmermann married Frances Rauch, 
who was born in Germany. They have become the parents of eight 
children: August, who is a carpenter and associated with his father; 
Paul, also a Hammond carpenter; Anna, who lives at home; Henry, a 
carpenter at Hammond; John, a painter by trade and living in Ham- 
mond ; Herman and Mary, both .in school ; and Richard, Jr., the young- 
est. The family are members and communicants of the St. Joseph's 
church. Mr. Zimmermann affiliates with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and is a member of the Fidelia Saengerbund, the German 
singing society of Hammond. 

Charles H. Mayer is one of the pioneer business men of Ham- 
mond. Forty years ago he was an employee in the packing com- 
pany, a young man down in the ranks, almost unknown outside the 
immediate circle of his acquaintances, and all the capital and resources 
that have been most significant in his rise to prominence were con- 
tained within his own head and hands. Charles H. Mayer is regarded 
as the originator of several enterprises which have brought distinction 
to Hammond as a commercial center. He is a manufacturer, and any- 
one who knows Hammond knows something of the work accomplished 
by Charles H. Mayer. 

Charles H. Mayer is a native of the Province of Holstein, Ger- 
many, born October 8, 1853, a son of Mathias and Maria (Loescher) 
Mayer. In 1876, after Charles H. Mayer had got established and was 
earning a living in this country, he had his parents and his brother 
August, who is now a citizen of West Hammond, come to this country, 
and the father and mother both spent the rest of their lives at Ham- 
mond. The elder Mayer, who was born November 18, 1815, died May 
17, 1902, while the mother who was born April 18, 1813, died March 12, 
1883. 



528 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

Charles H. Mayer, while growing up in Germany learned the trade 
of millwright, serving an apprenticeship of three and a half years. 
He was twenty years old when he left the German fatherland on the 
1st of November, 1873, and on the 17th day of that month arrived in 
Chicago. After a few months his enterprise was directed towards 
Hammond, in which village then chiefly distinguished for its packing 
plant, he arrived on March 4, 1874, and began to work at his trade on 
different contracts in the territory between Hammond and Chicago. 
Later Justice Loescher, a relative on his mother's side, employed him 
as foreman in the Hammond Packing Company until 1876. Until 
August 1, 1876, he worked as clerk in a grocery store. For the follow- 
ing ten years he was connected with the activities of Thomas Hammond. 

Such were the somewhat humble and ordinary beginnings of Mr. 
Mayer's successful career. In 1886 he established a bottling works, 
under the name of C. H. Mayer & Company, and that firm is one of 
the largest of its kind in the Calumet District, and has been furnishing 
reliable goods over a large territory for nearly thirty years. The 
business is now incorporated and Mr. Mayer is secretary and treasurer. 
That was only one of a number of business organizations with which 
his influence and work have been vital factors. He established the Ham- 
mond Ice Company, and is still president. He is vice president of the 
Hammond Brewing Company, of which he was one of the organizers ; 
is vice president of the Western Grain Products Company ; is president 
of the West Hammond Building and Loan Association; a director in 
the West Hammond Trust & Savings Bank; director and vice presi- 
dent of the American Trust & Savings Bank; secretary and treasurer 
of the Hammond Asphalt Products Company ; and is president of the 
Hammond Brass Works. He was for two terms tax collector for West 
Hammond, and has also served as treasurer of the school district com- 
prising West Hammond, in the fractional township of Thornton in 
Cook County, Illinois. Mr. Mayer is a director of the Chicago Bottlers 
Clearing House Association. In Masonry he has taken thirty-two degrees 
of the Scottish Rite and belongs to the Shrine, and also has affiliations 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Tribe of Ben Hur, 
the Royal League, the Independent Order of Foresters. 

At Hammond on December 19, 1877, Mr. Mayer married Louisa 
Drackert, and they have a fine family of twelve children, namely. 
Salome, the wife of Henry Shomaker, now president of the Western 
Grain Products Company of Hammond ; Maria, wife of William Hanlon, 
a stone cutter in Hammond ; Joseph P., bookkeeper for the Hammond 
Brewery, and who married Ida Bach ; Anna, wife of Henry Reissig, 
secretary of the American Trust & Savings Bank at Hammond ; George, 
connected with the C. H. Mayer Company ; Charles, also with that 
company ; Louisa, Margaret, Fred, all at home ; Julius and Adelaide, 
both students; and John who is still at home. 

Charles H. Friedrich. A native son of Lake County and a member 
of one of the early settled families in 'that part of the state, Charles 
H. Friedrich has had a long and active career, was one time sheriff of 
the county, and is now in the real estate and insurance business at 
Hammond. He has assisted in the promotion and extension of the 
industrial city and general improvement of its community along all 
lines, and is one of the prominent men in the Calumet District. 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 529 

Charles H. Friedrich was born March 14, 1861, at Crown Point, 
a son of Henry and Frederica (Klinkerman) Friederieh. His father 
was for many years well known as a stock raiser and butcher in Lake 
County. Born in Germany, he came to America in 1854, and in that 
year settled in Lake County, at a time when both its settlement and 
development were only a few degrees removed from pioneer condi- 
tions. Charles H. Friedrich grew up in Crown Point, attended the 
public schools, and later took a course in a business college in Chicago. 
From the time he was twelve years of age he had experience in buying 
stock with his father, and usually spent his summers in that line of 
work and after his schooling was finished made it his vocation until 
he was elected sheriff of Lake County in 1892. His service as sheriff 
continued until the close of 1894. It will be recalled that was a time 
of great industrial turbulence, when strikes prevailed in almost every 
line of business, and were especially virulent in the region about Lake 
Michigan. Conditions finally became so bad as to necessitate the calling 
out of the United States regular troops to quiet the violence. Sheriff 
Friedrich was engaged most of his time with many deputies guarding 
property and trying to preserve law and order in strike districts through- 
out Northern Lake County. 

Following his term as sheriff he was for two years in the hardware 
business in Crown Point, and then moved to Hammond and established 
his office as a real estate and fire insurance dealer. For the past twenty 
years Mr. Friedrich has bought and sold a large amount of real estate 
in and about Hammond and perhaps his largest transaction was the 
promotion and sale of the Fairview addition to Hammond, a tract of 
twenty-eight acres. He has also dealt extensively in property in Gary, 
East Chicago and Crown Point. 

Mr. Friedrich is affiliated with the Mystic Shrine, and also belongs 
to the Knights of Pythias and is a charter member of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, and is likewise a member of the Independent 
Order of Foresters and the Knights of the Maccabees. His church is the 
Presbyterian. On September 17, 1890, Mr. Friedrich married Emma 
Miller, of Crown Point, a daughter of Mathias and Barbara Miller. 
Her family came to Lake County in 1849, among the pioneers, and her 
father, who died in 1895, was long well known as a hotel man in Crown 
Point. Mr. Friedrich and wife have two children : Edwin H., who 
during his college career in DePauw University at Greencastle won 
high honors in the oratory contest ; and Hulda, who is now a student in 
the Milwaukee College. 

Mac Turner. While his career has been comparatively brief, the 
record of Mac Turner as an architect is one of solid accomplishment, 
and a number of the high-class structures in the Calumet District may be 
credited to his genius as an originator of the design and supervisor 
of the practical construction. 

Mac Turner was born in Southern Indiana on August 2, 1883, a son 
of James M. and Margaret (McClure) Turner. His father, who now 
lives in Hammond, was for many years engaged in school work. Mac- 
Turner graduated from the high school at Lawrenceburg, Indiana, and 
took his technical studies in the Art Institute at Chicago. His home 
has been in Hammond since 1902, and after several years of conscientious 
effort he established a reputation and has since been getting some of 
the more substantial rewards of success. He has been the architect 



530 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

for several schoolhouses and business blocks in Hammond and vicinity, 
and in East Chicago was architect for the Colm Building, the Friedman 
Building, the Calumet Bank Building at Indiana Harbor, and many 
others of only less importance. 

Mr. Turner is a member of the Hammond Commercial Club and the 
Hammond Country Club, and has fraternal relations with the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks, with the Knights of Pythias and the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. In October, 1910, he married Faye 
Conner of Xenia, Ohio. They have one child, James M. 

The Hammond Telephone Exchange. Beginning with a single line 
station in Tony Schacher's drug store in 1884, the telephone business 
in Hammond has grown steadily until today there are 3,500 telephones 
in use in the city. The telephone is so indispensable an adjunct and 
convenience of modern commerce that the following account of the 
development of the Hammond Telephone Exchange during a period of 
thirty years forms a brief but interesting historical chapter to illustrate 
one phase of growth in the Calumet District. 

The present exchange occupies a two-story building and an addition 
is now being made to this at a cost of $15,000. The switchboard equip- 
ment of the present exchange has twenty-one operators' positions, four- 
teen for local operators and seven for toll operators. When the new 
addition is completed the equipment will be increased to provide posi- 
tions for a total of nineteen local operators and eight toll operators. 

In the early days telephone development in Hammond was very slow. 
Between 1894 and 1896 only thirty-seven telephones were installed. In 
December, 1896, O. A. Krinbill bought out the drug store of Toney 
Schacher. Mr. Krinbill conducted the exchange in connection with his 
drug business until 1899, when the number of subscribers had grown to 
192. In that year Theo. Lee Ford succeeded Mr. Krimbill as manager. 
In the following year, 1900, the exchange had two managers, C. J. 
Huff succeeding J. C. Terry, who took Ford's place. In 1901 R. B. 
Adams assumed charge of the exchange. Two years later, in 1903, when 
the number of subscribers had reached 470, a new exchange was erected 
and O. A. Krinbill, who previously had conducted the telephone exchange 
in his drug store, gave up his drug business to become manager of the 
new telephone exchange. In 1905 the number of telephone stations crossed 
the thousand mark, and the business had gained steadily every year 
since with the exception of 1908 when there was a decrease in the number 
of stations on account of the panic of the preceding year. 

At the present time the Hammond Exchange handles an average of 
twenty thousand local calls per day, while the number of messages sent 
from Hammond to outside points average about six hundred per day. 
Telephone facilities between Hammond and surrounding cities and towns 
are unsurpassed, as is shown by the following list of toll lines connect- 
ing Hammond with outside points: Chicago, seventeen lines; South 
Chicago, four lines ; West Pullman, one line ; Morrell Park, three lines ; 
East Chicago, seven lines ; Crown Point, two lines ; Chicago Heights, two 
lines ; Blue Island, one line ; Gary, four lines ; Hobart, two lines ; Harvey, 
one line; Whiting, three lines; and South Bend, two lines. A new line 
is now being strung to Chicago and five new lines to South Chicago, which 
will make a total of thirty-one toll lines connecting Hammond with tele- 
phone exchanges within the Chicago City limits. 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 531 

The Hammond Exchange has a total operating force of thirty-four 
employes, including the supervisors, chief operators, etc. The exchange 
building and equipment are modern in every respect. Besides the operat- 
ing room, there is a rest room, and lunch room for the use of operators, 
and a spacious locker-room where operators keep their wraps in individual 
lockers. Hammond is the district headquarters of the Chicago Telephone 
Company in Indiana. 0. A. Krinbill is now district manager, and under 
him are T. W. Jones, plant chief ; R. N. Patchen, traffic chief ; and J. J. 
Carroll, chief clerk. 

0. A. Krinbill. The name Krinbill has been one of prominence in 
connection with business affairs, farming, merchandising, banking, and 
in the public interests of Lake County for more than fifty years. Mr. 
0. A. Krinbill 's career is especially identified with the City of Ham- 
mond, which has been his home since 1886. He is district manager for 
the Chicago Telephone Company, has given some service both in local 
and county offices, and is one of Lake County's bankers and foremost 
men of affairs. 

Oscar Arnold Krinbill was born at Crown Point, Indiana, August 3, 
1863. His parents, George and Anna Mary (Arnold) Krinbill, were 
both natives of Pennsylvania, and on coming west located for a brief 
time in Chicago, and in the fall of 1850 became early settlers in Lake 
County. George Krinbill for a number of years was a general merchant 
at Cedar Lake, later was in business at Crown Point, and on account 
of ill health finally retired to his farm, and lived in comfort for twenty 
years. Then returning to Crown Point, he was one of the active mer- 
chants of that city until his death. 

Mr. 0. A. Krinbill spent most of his boyhood on a farm, received 
sufficient education to equip him for all the practical duties of life, and 
at an early age had some experience in his father's store, and thus was 
possessed of serviceable knowledge when he began doing for himself. 

In 1886, after spending a year in Kansas, where he took up a claim 
and worked as a homesteader, he came to Hammond and found employ- 
ment in the old Spring factory, at that time one of the flourishing local 
industries. Later he studied pharmacy, and was engaged in the drug 
business at Hammond until 1903, when he sold out. Mr. Krinbill was 
the first local agent for the Chicago Telephone Company at Hammond, 
and the first exchange of that company was operated in his store, and 
had only twenty-five subscribers. With the rapid upbuilding of the town, 
and also with the rapid extension of the telephone service all over the 
country, the local telephone exchange soon grew to be an independent 
institution, and it required not only a number of operators but also the 
steady superintendence of one or more men. In September, 1903, Mr. 
Krinbill accepted the management of the Hammond exchange, in 1906 his 
field of supervision was extended to the management of the East Chicago, 
the Indiana Harbor and the Whiting exchanges, Lowell and St. Johns 
were added to the district in 1910, and in 1914, Mr. Krinbill was pro- 
moted to the office of district manager for the company, with supervision 
over all the exchanges in the Calumet Region. 

Mr. Krinbill, while a successful business man, has not neglected his 
part in public affairs. For six years he was a member of the Board of 
Education at Hammond, he gave five years of service in the office of 
county commissioner, having been appointed to fill a vacancy in January, 
1903. During his service as a member of the county board, the court- 



532 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

house was rebuilt at Crown Point, a new jail was constructed, and also 
the building for the Lake County Superior Court at Hammond was com- 
pleted. Mr. Krinbill is a member of the board of public safety at 
Hammond, was one of the organizers and is a director of the Hammond 
Chamber of Commerce, is a member of the Hammond County Club and 
the University Club, has taken the lodge, chapter and commandery 
degree in Masonry, has membership in the Mystic Shrine, and also 
belongs to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and to the 
Knights of Pythias. Mr. Krinbill was one of the organizers of the Ameri- 
can Trust & Savings Bank of Hammond, served as its first president, 
and is still a director. He is president of the Indiana Union Telephone 
and Telegraph Company at Crown Point', and is a director of the Lake 
County Title & Guarantee Company, with offices both in Hammond and 
Crown Point. 

Mr. Krinbill was married on June 15, 1893, to Miss Edith Weaver, 
of Burr Oak, Michigan. Her parents were Edward and Anna (Ran- 
dolph) Weaver, farmers of Southern Michigan. Mr. Krinbill and wife 
have one child, Marie Josephine. 

Indiana Steel Company. William P. Gleason. The builder of 
the Gary works of the Indiana Steel Company, the original and 
central institution in the great industrial community that has since 
made Gary City famous throughout the world, is William P. Gleason, an 
old and tried worker in the iron and steel industry. Mr. Gleason began 
as a youthful employe at Joliet, Illinois, and for several years prior to 
his removal to Gary was employed as an executive official by the United 
States Steel Corporation. 

As the nucleus of the present City of Gary, the works of the Indiana 
Steel Company and other subsidiary corporations of the United States 
Steel Corporation, have received a large amount of space in this publi- 
cation, but it will be not inappropriate to quote a few sentences in intro- 
duction to this sketch from a handsome pamphlet issued by the Indiana 
Steel Company in October, 1913. 

In the spring of 1906 the Indiana Steel Company, a subsidiary of 
the United States Steel Corporation, commenced the building of a steel 
plant known as Gary Works, at Gary. The steel plant was planned 
to consist of eight blast furnaces, fifty-six open hearth furnaces and iron 
and steel foundry, rail mill, billet mill, plate mill, merchant bar mills, 
car axle plant, large slabbing mills, and a by-product coke-oven plant, 
together with auxiliary shops, including machine shop, roll shop, elec- 
tric repair shop, blacksmith shop, etc. The first blast furnace was com- 
pleted and put in operation December 21, 1908. This was followed by 
the completion of the first open-hearth unit of fourteen furnaces and 
the rail mill in February, 1909. Before the close of the year 1909, sev- 
eral of the merchant bar mills were completed and placed in operation. 
During the year of 1911 the remainder of the plant construction work 
was practically completed, including the construction of 560 by-product 
coke-ovens. 

The plant site contains 1,235 acres of land bordering on the shores 
of the lake. To the east of this site the Gary Land Company, another 
subsidiary of the Steel Corporation, owns sufficient land for duplicating 
the present plant under construction, and several mills now completed 
or under construction have been arranged with reference to the future 
enlargement of the plant. Adjoining the plant of the Indiana Steel 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 533 

Company to the west is located the plant of the American Sheet and Tin 
Plate Company, containing 230 acres, on which have been erected mod- 
ern sheet and tin plate mills of large capacity. The steel slabs and 
sheet bars, which are worked up by this company, are furnished from 
the mills of the Indiana Steel Company. South of the American Sheet 
& Tin Plate Company's plant is the plant site of the American Bridge 
Company, containing 144 acres of land, on which have been erected large 
structural fabricating shops, with an annual capacity of from one hun- 
dred and fifty thousand to two hundred thousands tons of fabricated 
steel. Both the American Sheet & Tin Plate Company and the American 
Bridge Company are subsidiary companies of the United States Steel 
Corporation. Both of these plants were placed in operation during the 
year 1911, and are also operated by power furnished by the Indiana 
Steel Company. 

Mention should also be made of the splendid facilities on the lake 
front, consisting of a harbor slip capable of accommodating the largest 
lake steamers, with ore handling machinery operated by electricity and 
able to unload a vessel containing 12,000 tons of ore in less than ten 
hours. The storage yard has a capacity of approximately 2y 2 million 
tons of ore. The by-product coke oven plant produces the coke re- 
quired by the eight blast furnaces and also is able to supply a large 
part of the coke requirements at the Illinois Steel Company's plant in 
South Chicago. The power for operation of the plant furnaces is sup- 
plied by gas engines, with an auxiliary plant of steam engines for emer- 
gency. The gas for these engines and for the blowing engines is sup- 
plied from the blast furnaces as surplus gas. The plant is electrically 
equipped throughout and the power for operating the blast furnaces as 
well as the entire plant is developed by gas engines which are run by 
the waste gas from the blast furnaces. An excess of electric power is 
developed at the Gary works, and is transmitted a distance of five miles 
to the Universal Portland Cement Company's plant, where 27,000 bar- 
rels of Portland cement are manufactured daily. In addition the coke 
plant produces daily 50,000,000 cubic feet of gas for heating purposes 
throughout the mill. 

The estimated annual production of Gary Works is as follows: Pig 
iron, 1,500,000 tons; open hearth ingots, 2,250,000 tons; standard steel 
rails. 1,200,000 tons; blooms and billets, 1,200,000 tons; merchant steel 
bars, 600,000 tons ; plates, 240,000 tons ; car axles, 120,000 tons ; plate steel 
slabs, 600,000 tons; and coke, 3,000,000 tons; tar, 15,000,000 gallons per 
year; ammonium sulphate, 26,000 tons per year. 

The superintendent of the Gary Works of the Indiana Steel Com- 
pany, William P. Gleason, was born in Chicago February 12, 1865. His 
parents moved to Joliet during his childhood, and from the public 
schools of that city he started to work in the Joliet Rolling Mills. 
While there he became master mechanic, later went to Pueblo, Colorado, 
with the Colorado Fuel & Iron Company, and in 1900 moved to Pitts- 
burg as one of the executive officials of the Crucible Steel Company of 
America. He built the Clairton Steel Company's plant at Clairton, 
Pennsylvania, and was its assistant general manager until this plant was 
sold to the United States Steel Corporation in 1903. After that Mr. 
Gleason was with the Carnegie Steel Company until 1906. In that 
year the corporation sent him to Gary as superintendent, and he re- 
mained on the field individually superintending the construction of 



534 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

the great plant above sketched, and has since continued as superintendent 
of operations. 

Mr. Gleason has a beautiful home in Gary, and is married and has 
two daughters. He is a member of the Chicago Athletic Club, the Chi- 
cago Hamilton Club, the Chicago Automobile Club, the Hammond Coun- 
try Club, the Gary Commercial Club and the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, and is first and foremost in all the industrial and civic 
affairs of this splendid city by the lake. 

Herman E. Granger. Now one of the successful lawyers of Ham- 
mond, Mr. Granger was for a number of years prominent in labor 
councils, was at one time head of the Lake County Trades and Labor 
Council, and by his judicious and straightforward methods of handling 
the various responsibilities entrusted to his charge gained the complete 
confidence of his fellow craftsmen and at the present time has hundreds 
of warm friends in the labor unions and many of them are his clients. 
Mr. Granger prepared himself for the law by hard work in the intervals 
of his regular trade, attended night school for a number of years, and 
is a thoroughly equipped and able lawyer. 

Born in Lake County, Indiana, December 30, 1875, Mr. Granger is 
a son of William J. and Lucy M. (McCallister) Granger. His father 
was one of the substantial farmers of this section. His early education 
was received in the public schools, when a boy he began learning the 
trade of carpenter, and followed that as a journeyman for several years. 
In 1898, at the outbreak of the Spanish-American war, he enlisted in 
Company A of the One Hundred and Sixtieth Indiana Regiment, later 
being transferred to Company E of the same regiment, and remained 
in the service one year. His command was for 132 days on duty in 
Cuba. Later for five years Mr. Granger acted as business agent for 
Carpenters' Union No. 599, and during that time adjusted all the dif- 
ferences between his union and the employing contractors and never 
had to resort to a strike. He served once as delegate to the National 
Convention of Union Labor. He was also president of the Lake County 
Trade and Labor Council. For five years Mr. Granger was a student 
in night school, pursuing regular literary courses and also law studies, 
and was also a student in the Lincoln-Jefferson College of Law. Since 
being admitted to the bar in 1910 he has had all his time taken up 
with a growing general practice. 

On July 25, 1900, Mr. Granger married Daisy M. Cross, of Lowell, 
Indiana. Their three children are: Ellis, Forest and Herman E., Jr. 
The family are members of the Christian Church. 

George G. Blockie. For a long number of years George G. Blockie 
has been a popular member of trade circles in the Calumet District, 
and at the present time is serving as deputy sheriff of Lake County. 
Until assuming the responsibilities of his present position, Mr. Blockie 
was employed in his trade of machinist at Hammond and elsewhere, 
and learned his business in Lake County a number of years ago. 

George G. Blockie is a native of Chicago, born February 10, 1868. 
His parents were August and Marie (Schultz) Blockie. His father was 
a blacksmith, and thus mechanical pursuits are apparently a regular 
vocation of the family. His father in 1886 moved to Lake County, but 
George G. Blockie, after an education in the Chicago schools, went to 
Hammond in 1881, learned the tinner's trade, was for three years 






LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 535 

employed in farm work, and then joined his father for a year. At 
South Chicago he went through a course of training which fitted him 
for work as a machinist, and he was employed with different concerns 
in that line and has long heen regarded as one of the most expert 
workmen in his trade. In February, 1909, Mr. Blockie accepted the 
appointment as deputy sheriff, beginning his duties April 1st of that 
year. He served two terms under Sheriff Thomas Grant and is now 
deputy for Henry Whitaker. 

Mr. Blockie is affiliated with the Calumet Lodge of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. On January 6, 1891, he married Louise Heidel 
of New York City. They have one child, Alice Marie, who lives at 
home. 

Henry Bieker. Behind every successful business enterprise will 
be found experience, an ability to furnish good service, integrity and 
industrious application, and those qualities are more important than 
capital. These qualities of business success have helped to make the 
Bieker Bros. Company one of the solid concerns of Hammond. This 
company, which is incorporated, and the senior member of which is 
Henry Bieker, has two plants, one at 144 Sibley Street and the other 
at 257 N. Hohman Street, and deals in building materials, coal, flour, 
feed, lime, cement, brick, etc. 

An old resident of Lake County is Henry Bieker, who was born near 
Schererville in this county in November, 1867, a son of William and 
Theresa Bieker. His father was a farmer, and Henry Bieker spent 
the years until he was twenty-one in the country, with such education as 
was acquired by attendance at district school. Learning the carpenter's 
trade, he worked at that for five years, and about World's Fair time 
went to Chicago and was for two years connected with the police force. 
On May 4, 1896, Mr. Bieker established a small business at Hammond, 
dealing in flour and feed, under the name Bieker Bros., his brother 
William being his partner. The business grew from year to year, and 
in 1909 was incorporated as the Bieker Bros. Company. Mr. Henry 
Bieker was also elected a director of the American Trust & Savings 
Bank of Hammond at the time of its organization. 

At St. John in Lake County Mr. Bieker married Mary Bohling, a 
daughter of substantial farming people in that vicinity, Andrew and 
Mary Bohling. To their marriage have been born eight children: 
Andrew F., Cecelia T., Wilhelmina Anna, Henry N., Ruth K., Daniel 
W., William J. and Marie J. The family are members of St. Joseph's 
Church, and Mr. Bieker is a trustee. He is affiliated with the Knights 
of Columbus, the Catholic Order of Foresters, the Catholic Benevolent 
League, and as a Hammond business man has his place on the roll of the 
Commercial Club. 

George D. Helgen. Probably none of the recent developments in 
the art of healing have been attended with more uniform success than 
the science of Chiropractic. This is a new science of adjusting the cause 
of disease without drugs, based on a thorough knowledge of the nervous 
system. Nerves which control the various functions of the body emerge 
from small openings between the bony segments of the spinal column. 
A slight variation of these bones will cause pressure on a nerve and 
cut off the flow of mental impulses, lowering the vitality and the power 
of resistance of the tissue, the result of which is disease. Thus the 



536 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

Chiropractic method has been developed to adjust the abnormality and 
remove the cause by removing the pressure and permitting normal size 
and function of the nerves with restoration of health of body and 
mind. 

The chief representative of this school at Hammond is G. D. Helgen, 
whose office is at 93 State Street. Doctor Helgen was born in Roland, 
Iowa, October 30, 1880, a son of Ole and Belle Helgen. His father was 
a merchant. The son had a public school education, during his early 
youth was engaged in the real estate business at Emmettsburg, Iowa, 
and also served as county clerk for two years. Attracted by the science 
of Chiropractic, he took a course in the college at Davenport, Iowa, and 
later in the Schroth Institute, and in 1912 came to Hammond and suc- 
ceeded J. M. Jones who had previously had an office in that city as a 
chiropractor. 

Mr. Helgen is vice president of the Hammond Finance & Develop- 
ment Company, which is captalized at $10,000. He is a member of the 
Hammond Country Club and the Chamber of Commerce, and is a 
member of the Lutheran Church. On April 7, 1908, at Colby, Wis- 
consin, he married Clara A. Haugner. daughter of Andrew and Marie 
Haugner. Mr. Helgen is a member of the Indiana State and the Inter- 
national Association of Chiropractors, and has recently taken the Illi- 
nois examination to qualify him for practice in that state. 

Paul B. Lipinski. During a residence at Hammond of twenty years 
Paul B. Lipinski has become one of the most influential citizens among 
his compatriots, the Polish people of the city, whom he has repre- 
sented in various official ways, and in whose welfare he has interested 
himself often without remuneration, and has merited the high regard 
and confidence which he has enjoyed. At the same time Mr. Lipinski 
while growing up with the city has developed a large business among 
all classes of people in real estate, insurance, and has acquired some 
important relations with the commercial community. 

Born at Strassburg in West Prussia, October 2, 1868, Paul B. Lipinski 
is a son of Frank and Agnes Lipinski. His father, who was a cabinet 
maker by trade, brought his family to America, in 1877, when Paul was 
nine years of age, and settled in New York City, where he remained 
a resident until his death at the age of sixty-five. Paul B. Lipinski 
was not reared in affluence, and from an early age had to battle for 
himself with the difficulties of the world. Most of his education he 
acquired by attending night school in New York City. He learned the 
trade of cabinet maker and was employed as a draftsman and foreman 
of a factory in New York and finally acquired a business of his own. 
In 1894 he sold out and came west and located at Hammond, which 
was then a young town. Here he met the panicky conditions which 
were gradually settling down over the entire country and the difficulties 
besetting his independent enterprise at Hammond were increased by 
the fact that he was unable to collect the money owing to him from 
the man to whom he had sold his business in New York City. Thus for 
a year or so he was put to hard straits and was willing to accept any 
employment which -would enable him to make both ends meet. During 
one season he taught school out in South Dakota, but then returned to 
Hammond and with the brightening of financial prospects opened an 
office for real estate, insurance, and mortgage loans. He maintains 
his headquarters at 500 Hohman Street in Hammond, and has branches 




7& 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 537 

in Hegewisch, East Chicago, Indiana Harbor and Gary, and does a large 
amount of work as an official notarius for the Polish citizens. 

Mr. Lipinski was one of the charter organizers and is a director of 
the Lake County Title and Guarantee Company, was a former director 
of the American Trust & Savings Bank, and is secretary and treasurer 
of the Northern Trust & Savings Bank, located at 237 Hohman Street. 
He is secretary of the First Polish Building & Loan Association, is 
secretary of the Sobieski Building & Loan Association and is appraiser 
for the Home Building & Loan Association. 

He is on the state committee for the Polish National Alliance, an 
organization of which he was president for several years. Fraternally 
he is affiliated with the Fraternal Order of Eagles and has membership 
in the Hammond Chamber of Commerce. 

On June 13, 1894, he married Lottie Hojnacki. Their three chil- 
dren are : Frank, born 1896, and now attending school ; Edwin and 
George, twins, born 1899, and both in school. 

Hon. Thomas E. Knotts. The first and only mayor of Gary, Thomas 
E. Knotts has been so closely identified with that city that to many 
people mention of Gary suggests Mayor Knotts, and it would be impossi- 
ble to consider the history of Gary either as a municipality or as a busi- 
ness center without reference to this enterprising and farsighted citizen, 
who about eight years ago stood in the midst of the sand barrens and 
the scrub oaks and helped plan and plot the lines along which the city 
has since grown. 

Thomas E. Knotts was born May 4, 1861, in Highland County, Ohio, 
a son of F. D. and Margaret Knotts, who in 1866, by team and wagon, 
left Ohio and established a new home first on a farm four miles from 
Lafayette and then in Medaryville, Indiana. The father was a farmer 
and a carpenter. Thomas E. Knotts received a common school educa- 
tion in Indiana, and then taught school eight terms in this state, and for 
four years was engaged as superintendent of the Indian school of Dakota 
Territory. For a time he was superintendent of the high schools at 
DeSmet in Dakota Territory. From 1879 to 1884 Mr. Knotts was a stu- 
dent in Valparaiso University, and completed work in the commercial, 
the teachers and scientific courses. He was a successful teacher, and 
that work as everything else he has ever undertaken was pursued with 
a thorough energy and an ability to get results which has been char- 
acteristic of him in every subsequent endeavor. 

In 1891 Mr. Knotts first became identified with Northern Lake County 
when he moved to Hammond, and there engaged in the real estate and 
fire insurance business. While there he was also for a time on the police 
force and was police commissioner of the city. Mr. Knotts was one of 
the first on the ground after the plans had been formulated for the estab- 
lishment of a great industrial center at Gary. Resigning his place as 
police commissioner at Hammond, he established his home in Gary on 
May 4, 1906, his brother A. F. Knotts, who was connected with the steel 
corporation, opened the first real estate office, and bought the first land 
outside the tracts acquired by the steel company. In July, 1906, Mr. 
Knotts was appointed the first postmaster at Gary, which at that time 
had a fourth class office, serving only a few dozen patrons. He held 
that position S 1 /^ years, and in the meantime had been otherwise honored 
officially. He was elected a member of the first town board in July, 
1906, was made president of the board, and served as such until Novem- 



538 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

ber 5, 1909, when he was elected mayor of the new city corporation. 
With that office he has been repeatedly honored down to the present 
time, having been elected on the democratic ticket. Mayor Knotts has 
many interests in his home city, and is at the head of Knotts-McEoberts 
Real Estate and Insurance, the first and the oldest firm of its kind in 
Gary, and in many respects the largest operators in that field. 

On August 12, 1888, Mayor Knotts married Ella E. Long of Medary- 
ville, Indiana. To their marriage were born eight children, two of whom 
are deceased. Mr. Knotts is well known in fraternal circles, having 
membership in the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Knights 
of Pythias, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Loyal Order of 
Moose, the Fraternal Order of Eagles and the Modern Woodmen of 
America. 

John Frederick Krost. One of the oldest and most prominent 
families of Lake County is that of Krost, which has represented the 
sterling qualities of German-American citizenship, was established in 
Lake County sixty years ago, and which has been represented by several 
prominent men. 

Concerning John Krost, the founder of the family name in this 
county, the Rev. T. H. Ball, in writing of some of the notable German 
pioneers in Lake County in 1904, said: "One more of many citizens 
have favored Lake County who by means of talent and intelligent effort 
became prominent was John Krost. Born in Germany in 1828 he became 
a resident in Iiobart in 1853, where for one year he was clerk in a store, 
then for about six years was clerk at Merrillville, and a farmer for two 
years ; and then he made his final home in Crown Point. He was elected 
county treasurer in 1862 and continued in office until 1867. In 1868 
he was elected county auditor and held that office for eight years. 
He was accommodating and very courteous, he was kind and generous to 
the poor, the needy and the unfortunate or the unsuccessful. He was an 
exemplary member of the Roman Catholic Church. He accumulated 
quite an amount of property, and his home on Main Street was one of 
comforts, of social advantages, of cultivation and refinement. His 
children have been educated. He died on March 28, 1890, not only 
one of the wealthy, but one of the most kindly and gentlemanly of 
Crown Point's many courteous citizens." 

It should also be added that John Krost came to America in 1848, 
and during his residence at Crown Point was engaged in business as a 
grain merchant. He married Katherine Horst, and they became the 
parents of six children, namely : Clara B. ; John F. ; Joseph, a physician ; 
John G. ; Caroline ; and Edward A. His wife dying in 1876, John 
Krost married, second, Mary Ludwig, and they had three children : 
Robert A., Emma K. and Gerard N. 

John Frederick Krost, who represents the family name at Hammond, 
and at one time filled with credit the office of county recorder, was born 
in Lake County March 28, 1858. His early education was acquired in 
the public schools, and later he attended the Notre Dame University at 
South Bend. His business career began at Hammond as superintendent 
of a lumber yard for five years, and he then was connected with the 
drug business. After the first election of Grover Cleveland in 1884, Mr. 
Krost was appointed postmaster at Hammond, and has the distinction 
of having been the second to fill that office. He served four years, and 
on leaving the office was engaged in the flour and feed business for three 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION . 539 

years. In 1892 Mr. Krost was elected county recorder of Lake County, 
and tilled the office until 1897. His record of official performance was 
marked by the genial courtesy which is characteristic of the man, and 
by an unwavering honesty and fidelity to every trust reposed in him. 
After leaving the office of recorder Mr. Krost was engaged in the under- 
taking business as senior member of the firm of Krost and Emmerling. 
Ill health compelled him to retire from this work, and he then opened a 
real estate and insurance office at Hammond, and for many years has 
had a successful business in that line. 

In more recent years he has taken an active part in the public af- 
fairs of his home city. For two years he was a member of the board of 
public works, and for three years has been treasurer of the board of 
education and has two years yet to serve in that office. In 1883 Mr. Krost 
married Miss Emma K. Kaufer of Mankato, Minnesota. Their three 
children are : John G . Krost, who is a Jesuit priest at Prairie du Chien, 
Wisconsin; Mary, wife of John F. Beckman, a prominent Hammond 
business man and manager of the Home Lumber Company ; and Monica, 
wife of Roy Garceau, a merchant of Tacoma, Washington. The family 
are members of the Catholic Church, and Mr. Krost is a trustee of St. 
Joseph's Church, and he belongs to the Catholic Order of Foresters, 
and to the Knights of Columbus. 

John M. Stinson. Locating at Hammond in 1897, John M. Stinson 
has won success both in law and business. It has been characteristic of 
members of the modern American bar to extend their activities to execu- 
tive relations as well as advisory counsel with large business enterprises, 
and Mr. Stinson is one who has proved his usefulness in both fields. His 
position is due to his own attainments, since he was a poor boy who 
worked his way through college, and has won success on the merit of 
practical achievement. 

John Marion Stinson was graduated from the Valparaiso College of 
Indiana in 1897, was admitted to the bar in the same year, and located 
at Hammond to begin general practice. His career as a lawyer has been 
continuous in that city since that time, and he was admitted to practice 
in the Federal Court on June 5, 1901. Mr. Stinson represents several 
banks and other large business concerns as attorney, and is president of 
the Gary Granite Brick and Stone Company, which was organized in 
1908 and has a capital of $75,000 ; is president of the Clarence I. Hoff- 
man Construction Company, capitalized at $100,000 ; is president of the 
Employees Real Estate and Investment Company at Indiana Harbor. 

Mr. Stinson has membership in the Hammond Country Club, the Gar- 
field Club, an organization under the auspices of the Christian Church 
of which he is a member; belongs to the Chamber of Commerce, the 
Hammond Motor Boat Club, and stands high both in social and civic 
affairs. 

Mr. Stinson 's parents were Kentuckians of Simpson County, and 
after the birth of J. M. Stinson on March 27, 1875, they moved from 
Missouri, where they had resided two years, to Kentucky, Avhere Mr. 
Stinson grew up. At the age of twelve years he was clerking in a coun- 
try store at $1.20 a week, and for several years spent his winters in that 
fashion while he assisted his father on the farm during the other months 
of the year. At the age of eighteen he borrowed $12 to pay his fare 
from Kentucky to Valparaiso, Indiana, and entered the college there 
with no funds, working his way to pay for tuition and board and living 



540 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

expenses, and graduated in the law at the end of four years. Mr. Stinson 
is prominent in Masonic circles, having taken the Knights Templar 
degree, and belongs to the Mystic Shrine. He also affiliates with the 
Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the 
Modern Woodmen of America, and the Royal League. On August 11, 
1897, he married Florence Anna Wolcott, of Glidden, Iowa, a daughter 
of Elton R. and Emily Wolcott, the former being an Iowa banker. They 
are the parents of two children : Elton Wolcott Stinson, born January 
27, 1902; and Retta Margaret, born October 2, 1904. 

Ferdinand Richard Schaaf. Postmaster of Hammond, Ferdinand 
R. Schaaf lias lived in that city since he was a boy, and in many ways 
has identified himself with the larger business and civic interests of the 
conmiunit3\ He is a member of several banking institutions of the Cal- 
umet region, has large and important interests in other lines of business, 
and little move than thirty-five years of age has made himself an influen- 
tial figure in affairs. 

Ferdinand Richard Schaaf was born at Hamburg, Germany, April 
15, 1878, a son of Ferdinand R. and Catherine (Schlueter) Schaaf. His 
father, who has long been identified with the real estate and insurance 
business, came to America in 1880, and after ten years' residence in 
Chicago moved to Hammond in 1890. The son was twelve years old 
when the family established its home in Hammond, and he acquired his 
education by attending the public schools of that city and of South 
Chicago. lie also had a course in a business college, and with that 
preparation for a career started to earn his living as bookkeeper with 
the Knickerbocker Ice Company and also with the Standard Oil Com- 
pany. In 1908 Mr. Schaaf was elected township trustee of North Town- 
ship and served in that office four years. He has for a number of years 
been prominent in republican party affairs, has served as county chair- 
man of Lake County, has been a member of the State Republican Com- 
mittee and otherwise active in furthering and supporting the party wel- 
fare. On December 19, 1910, Mr. Schaaf was appointed postmaster at 
Hammond, and his term expires at the close of the present year, 1914. 
As a banker Mr. Schaaf is vice president of the East Chicago Bank, 
vice president of the Farmers and Merchants Bank at Highlands, is a 
director in the First National Bank at Whiting, and a member of the 
firm F. R. Schaaf &. Company, bankers and brokers. For one term he 
served as secretary of the Lake County Bankers' Association. He is also 
vice president of the Northern Indiana Lumber & Coal Co. ; a member 
of the firm of Hammond & Schaaf, at Hammond, and is vice president 
of the Postmasters' Association of America. 

On June 12, 1901, at Hammond, Mr. Schaaf married Mary Agnes 
Roberts, a daughter of George M. and Agnes (Atchison) Roberts, her 
father being one of the large property owners of Northern Indiana. 
Mr. Schaaf has membership in the Hamilton Club of Chicago, the 
Chicago Automobile Club, the Llammond Country Club, the East Chi- 
cago Club, the Hammond Commercial Club, and the Indiana Society of 
Chicago. In Masonry he has taken thirty-two degrees of the Scottish 
Rite, belongs to the Mystic Shrine, to the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, to the Knights of Pythias, and to the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, and the Modern Woodmen of America. He and 
family worship in the First Evangelical Church, of which he is a 
trustee. 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 541 

Cyrus W. Campbell, M. D. It was thirty years' active practice 
in medicine in Indiana, twenty-three of which have heen spent in Ham- 
mond, which have brought Dr. Cyrus W. Campbell the distinctions and 
rewards of the best type of physician. His service has been commen- 
surate with the length of years in practice, and his genial personal qual- 
ities combined with an expert knowledge of his profession have won him 
the strong affections of hundreds of families in Hammond and vicinity. 

Dr. Campbell was born at Monterey, Indiana, October 15, 1850. His 
parents were Francis G. and Delia A. Campbell. His father was for a 
number of years an editor, and also was in business both as a merchant 
and farmer. Dr. Campbell attended the public schools of Indiana and 
studied medicine privately and also in Franklin, Pennsylvania. He 
began practice in 1880 at Blue Grass, Indiana, and remained there for 
more than ten years. In the meantime he had continued his studies in 
the Medical College of Indiana at Indianapolis, and was graduated M. D. 
in 1888. In May, 1891, Dr. Campbell moved to Hammond, and has since 
enjoyed a large general practice in that city. He was at one time secre- 
tary of the Hammond Board of Health. Professionally his relations are 
with the Lake County Medical Society and the Indiana State Medical 
Association. 

In October, 1893, Dr. Campbell was married at Monterey, Indiana, 
to Ellen Wallace. Their six children are mentioned briefly as follows : 
Margaret, Mrs. M. J. White, of Hammond; Ethel, Mrs. F. J. Stake- 
miller, of Miami, Florida; Claudius, of Hammond; (Vlestia Fay, 
Mrs. Welcome Kindig, of Bunker Hill, Indiana ; Murley, of Hammond ; 
and Dean H., at home. Dr. Campbell has membership in the Hammond 
Country Club, and is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias and the 
Knights of the Maccabees. 

Francis Harry Fox, M. D., is one of the younger members 
of the medical fraternity of Hammond, but in ability and extent of 
professional relations is regarded as one of the leading physicians and 
surgeons in that city. He brought to his work in Hammond thorough 
scholarship attainment and a broad experience gained both through pri- 
vate practice and hospital work. 

Francis Harry Fox is a native of Pennsylvania, born in Bradford 
August 22, 1880. His father, Francis H. Fox, was for many years 
actively identified with the oil industry in Western Pennsylvania. The 
maiden name of the mother was Jane Tait. Doctor Fox attended the 
public schools of Derrick City, finishing at the high school, and after 
one year at the Western University of Pennsylvania entered the old 
and distinguished center of medical education, the Jefferson Medical 
College of Philadelphia, where after three years he was graduated in 
1902 M. D. He began his practice in June of the same year at Pine 
Grove, Pennsylvania, and from there in 1905 went to West Frankfort, 
Illinois, and was surgeon for the Chicago and Eastern Illinois Railway 
Company and the Deering Coal Company until 1907. With that experi- 
ence behind him. Doctor Fox came to Hammond and has since been 
chiefly engaged in looking after a large and growing general practice. 
While the Hammond Medical Society was in existence Doctor Fox 
served as its president. He is a member of the Lake County Medical 
Society and the Indiana State and Tenth District Medical Association. 
He also belongs to the Hammond Country Club. Doctor Fox was mar- 
ried in 1902, at Philadelphia, to Mary Theresa LaFave. They have two 
children : Adelaide Estella and Francis Harry, Jr. 



542 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

Gary Land Company. Capt. H. S. Norton. A history of the modern 
City of Gary practically begins with the operation of the Gary Land 
Company, which was organized in 1906 as a subsidiary to the United 
States Steel Corporation. The officers were E. B. Buffington, president; 
J. G. Thorpe, vice president ; and T. J. Hyman, secretary and treasurer. 
The Gary Land Company was organized for the purpose of handling the 
land acquired by the steel corporation on the proposed site of the new 
industrial city. The land company had acquired ownership of approx- 
imately nine thousand acres of land, in one continuous body. In the 
spring of 1906 the company began building the City of Gary, primarily 
for the purpose of providing suitable homes for the employees of the 
various industries established by the steel corporation. The City of 
Gary was consequently incorporated, compromising approximately 
thirty-two square miles of territory. This was the area over which the 
Gary Land Company had jurisdiction. Sites were sold to the Indiana 
Steel Company, the American Sheet and Tin Company, the American 
Bridge Company, for industrial sites, while all the land was laid out and 
subdivided to provide a model city. Streets sixty feet in width were laid 
out in rectangular fashion, and under the supervision of competent sani- 
tary engineers a sewer system was planned and installed throughout the 
Gary Land Company's first subdivision. All the sewers, gas and water 
pipes are located under the alleys, so as to avoid the necessity of dis- 
turbing street pavements in order to repair these pipes. The Land Com- 
pany 's subsequent additions were developed and improved in the same 
manner. The principal street running north and south, designated 
Broadway, is one hundred feet in width, and was paved with granitoid 
or concrete blocks. The principal street running east and west, desig- 
nated Fifth Avenue, is eighty feet in width and similarly paved. Other 
streets were paved with macadam. At the close of 1913 within the city 
limits of Gary were 180 miles of paved streets. A supply of water was 
provided by a tunnel constructed 15,000 feet in length to the deep 
waters of Lake Michigan, and a supply of pure water has been 
supplied equal to the needs of a city of 250,000 population. An artificial 
gas plant was also established, and electric current for lighting and 
power was provided from the Gary works. These public utilities, water, 
gas and electric light, are controlled by the Gary Heat, Light and Water 
Company, a subsidiary of the United States Steel Corporation. 

The Gary Land Company has put up all told a thousand residences, 
more than six hundred of them in the first subdivision, and varying in 
cost from twenty-five thousand dollars to fifteen hundred dollars each. 
About three hundred houses in the sixth subdivision cost from five thou- 
sand dollars to eighteen hundred dollars each. Building lots are offered 
for sale at prices representing approximately the cost of the land plus 
cost of improvements, and a special discount is offered to employees of 
the subsidiary companies of the United States Steel Corporation. Strict 
requirements are maintained as to the character of buildings to be 
erected, and purchasers of lots are required to erect buildings of approved 
character within eighteen months after purchase. The title does not 
pass to the purchaser until the completion of the building. In the busi- 
ness district the requirements concerning improvements made it neces- 
sary for the purchaser of each 25-foot lot to construct a building valued 
at least ten thousand dollars. During the first four years buildings of 
two stories were permitted in the business district, while at the present 
time the requirement is for three or more stories. 




<M 




LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 543 

The Gary Land Company has necessarily employed a large force of 
skilled engineers, architects, artesans in the building trade, for the con- 
struction of these buildings and for carrying out the vast work under- 
taken in building a new town from the foundation up and in the space 
of only two or three years. 

The director and manager in charge of these comprehensive enter- 
prises of the Gary Land Company has been Capt. H. S. Norton, who 
enjoys the unique honor of having overseen the growth and upbuilding 
of an entire city. Captain Norton was born at Lockport, Illinois, Novem- 
ber 27. 1865. a son of DeWitt C. and Maria L. (Singer) Norton. The 
father was a prominent business man who conducted a line of stone 
quarries at different points about Chicago. Captain Norton was liberally 
educated, graduating from DePauw University of Indiana in 1888. He 
was associated with his father in the stone business until the latter 's 
death in 1892, and then continued in the same line independently at 
Bedford, Indiana, until 1896. At that date he became identified with 
the Illinois Steel Company at Joliet, and in 1906 was placed in charge 
of the field force and practical construction operations of the Gary Land 
Company. 

Captain Norton gained his title from service as captain in the Third 
Regiment of the Illinois National Guards, an office he held two years. 
In 1888 Captain Norton married Miss Lu Martin, of Lemont, Illinois. 
They have three children : Genevieve B., Mildred L., and Marion L. 
Captain Norton has membership in the college fraternity Delta Tau 
Delta, is a Knights Templar Mason and member of the Shrine, and affili- 
ates with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, and the Knights of Pythias. He is president 
of the Gary Commercial Club and was one of the organizers of the 
Country Club. He also belongs to the University Club, is a trustee of 
the Gary Y. M. C. A., and is Senior Warden in Christ's Episcopal Church. 

East Side Trust and Savings Bank of Hammond. While this is one 
of the new financial institutions that have sprung up in response to the 
demand of trade and the growing commerce and industries in the Calumet 
region, it has already well justified the confidence of its organizers and 
of the business community which it serves. 

The East Side Trust and Savings Bank was organized on March 22, 
1912, but did not begin business for several months, and its first year of 
fiscal operation closed on November 1, 1913. The capital stock of the 
company is $25,000, and, besides general banking facilities, it affords 
the security and stability of a corporation for all kinds of trusts, handling 
insurance, issuing bonds, collecting rents, and acting as trustee, receiver, 
administrator, guardian, and the general handling of estates. The total 
resources of the company on November 1, 1913, amounted to $120,813.02, 
and deposits at that time were nearly $95,000. 

The bank has suitable quarters at the corner of Calumet Avenue and 
State Street, in Hammond. Its officers are: Englehardt Ullrich, presi- 
dent; John C. Becker, vice president; J. Floyd Irish, cashier; Arnold 
Keldenich and Clayton B. Stiver, directors. 

Englehardt Ullrich. The president and one of the chief organizers 
of the East Side Trust and Savings Bank of Hammond, Englehardt 
Ullrich, has been identified with that city in various and important rela- 
tions since 1896. Mr. Ullrich was in the coal business, wholesale and 



544 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

retail, up till 1903, and has since been chiefly in real estate and insur- 
ance, doing a large business in that field, and at the same time carrying 
on the executive work of the bank. Mr. Ullrich is director and treas- 
urer of the Becker & Tapper Realty Company of Indiana, and has been 
specially prominent in the building of moderate priced homes for the 
working people, having constructed more buildings at such prices than 
any other man in Hammond. In 1902 he was elected and served one 
term as alderman from the First Ward. 

Englehardt Ullrich was born in Kassel, Germany, November 7, 1867, 
a son of Henry and Tenia Ullrich. His father was a farmer. After 
being reared and receiving a fairly substantial education in Germany, 
Englehardt Ullrich emigrated to the United States when he was seventeen 
years old, and spent his first three years employed as a farm hand. He 
served two years in apprenticeship to the blacksmith trade, and for nine 
years was employed in that work in the City of Chicago. From Chicago 
he came to Hammond, and has since shown a marked capacity for general 
business enterprise. 

In April, 1895, Mr. Ullrich married Anna Sippel of Tinley Park. Cook 
County, Illinois. There are three children : Arthur J., who is assisting 
his father in the bank ; Dora ; and Walter. The family are members of 
St. Paul's Lutheran Church. Besides his other business connections he 
is vice president and a director in the Gary Brick and Stone Company, 
and was also a director in the Lake County Title and Guarantee Com- 
pany for about five years. 

Peter II. Bick. Now associated as one of the partners in the large 
real estate business conducted by Ullrich & Bick, Mr. Bick has known 
Hammond more or less closely as a resident since 1883, though for ten 
years he was in business in Chicago. 

Peter H. Bick was born in Trier, Germany, May 6, 1874, a son of 
Casper and Anna Bick. His father, who brought his family to Ham- 
mond in 1883, was for a number of years engaged in the real estate 
business and had a number of houses which he rented. The son received 
his education in the public and parochial schools of Hammond, where 
he grew up from the age of nine years, and supplemented his early school 
training by a course in a business college. He was connected with the 
drug trade for several years, and then went to Chicago and spent ten 
years in that city as credit man and sales manager for a laundry supply 
house. Returning to Hammond, and having a thorough knowledge of the 
laundry business, he established a plant and operated a high grade 
laundry until March, 1913. Mr. Bick became associated with Mr. E. 
Ullrich in real estate and insurance business in November, 1913. 

In 1907 Mr. Bick married Mary E. Kiley at Chicago. Their three 
children are Mary Catherine, Elizabeth and Ann. The family has mem- 
bership in St. Joseph's Catholic Church, and Mr. Bick is a member of 
the Chicago Laundrymen's Club and the Spring Bank Club of Chicago. 

John N. Beckman. Representing stanch German-American stock 
in Lake County, John N. Beckman, who has again and again been hon- 
ored with public office, and who is active in the real estate business, has 
had a long and honorable career. 

He was born in Hanover Township of Lake County, October 26, 
1856. He was the oldest of nine children, three sons and six daughters, 
whose parents were Herman C. and Elizabeth (Fink) Beckman. Her- 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 545 

man C. Beckman was born in Germany, June 3, 1822, and died July 5, 
1894. Reared to manhood in Germany, he had a good education and 
was a man of more than ordinary intelligence. In 1846 he arrived at 
New York, and lived in the East until 1856, in the month of May of 
which year he came to Lake County. He established a store at Hanover 
Center, and also engaged in raising high grade cattle. He voted the 
republican ticket from the formation of that party, was affiliated with 
the Masons and Odd Fellows, and his name is one that deserves men- 
tion among the early settlers of Lake County. His wife was born also 
in Germany, August 14, 1835, and died in July, 1879. 

John N. Beckman grew up in Lake County, received a common 
school education, and later attended the Ball Institute and the Bryant 
& Stratton Business College. Most of the early years were spent on 
a farm, and he later engaged in merchandising, and finally in real 
estate, and has long enjoyed a secure prosperity as one of Lake County's 
business men. He is one of the leading republicans of the county, 
having cast his first vote for James A. Garfield, and in 1900 was elected 
joint representative of Lake County, and was returned regularly to 
the Legislature for several years. Mr. Beckman affiliates with the 
Independent Order of Foresters and the Knights of Pythias. 

On November 3, 1880, he married Mary A. Echterling, who was 
born in Germany, May 14, 1858, and came of a Catholic family. Twelve 
children were born to their marriage, of whom six grew to maturity, 
and several of the sons have found important positions in the business 
world. John F. Beckman is president of the Home Lumber Company 
of Hammond, and a brief sketch of his career appears elsewhere. 
August C. is a civil engineer. 

John Frederick Beckman. Many of the most successful business 
men graduated from the "road" into prominent executive positions, 
and J. F. Beckman of Hammond is an example of a young man who 
served his apprenticeship in making the rounds of the trade from town 
to town, then five years ago became bookkeeper for the Home Lumber 
Company, of which he is now president and manager. 

John Frederick Beckman was born in Brunswick, Indiana, June 25, 
1882, a son of John N. and Mary A. (Echterling) Beckman. His father 
has had a business career chiefly in real estate. The son received a 
public school education, and later was a student in Purdue University 
at Lafayette. On leaving college he took up his business career as a 
traveling salesman, and spent five years selling goods on the road. In 
1909 he entered the Home Lumber Company as bookkeeper, and later, 
on the reorganization of the concern, he stepped into the position of 
president and manager. The business is one of the most flourishing 
of its kind in Hammond, and Mr. Beckman 's place in local affairs is 
already secure. 

He is a member of the Hammond Country Club, the Knights of 
Columbus, and in college was an Alpha Omega. His church is St. 
Joseph's Catholic. On January 10, 1911, he married Mary Krost, 
a daughter of John F. and Emma (Kaufer) Krost of Hammond. 
They have one child, Mary Elizabeth. 

Roswell O. Johnson. In 1913, on the citizens ticket. Roswell O. 
Johnson was elected mayor of Gary, an honor carrying with it heavy 
responsibilities, and Mr. Johnson has entered office with the complete 



546 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

confidence of the better element of citizenship in Gary, and his previous 
standing as a citizen and professional man is a guarantee of his con- 
scientious and efficient performance of his duties to the public. Already 
Mr. Johnson has introduced many changes and reforms in the manner 
of conducting municipal affairs, and from what has been done, there is 
a promise of a thoroughly business-like administration, noted not less for 
its economy and effectiveness, than for its honesty. 

Roswell 0. Johnson was born in Adams County, Indiana, April 23, 
1872, and is a son of Joseph P. and Martha E. Johnson. His father 
was a farmer in Eastern Indiana, and Mayor Johnson spent his boy- 
hood in the wholesome environment of the farm. The early education 
acquired from the local schools was supplemented by a college career 
at the Tri-State Normal School, where he graduated, and for several 
years he read law at Decatur, Indiana, with Paul G. Hooper, being 
admitted to the bar in 1899. However, his early period of practice was 
comparatively brief, and for a number of years he was engaged in the 
performance of official duties. In 1900 he was appointed collector of 
customs on the Mexican border, at Douglas, Arizona, and remained in 
the Southwest in that office until 1906. During 1899, before leaving the 
state, he made the race for the office of state senator of Indiana. On 
returning from the Southwest, Mr. Johnson entered the Indianapolis 
Law School, and was graduated in 1907. For two years he practiced at 
Kendallville, Indiana, and since 1909, has been a resident and in the law 
and real-estate at Gary. He is president of the Indiana Sales Company, 
which has put on the market two important additions to Gary, the first 
being Schug Park, comprising 384 lots, and the Woodland Park, of 343 
lots. 

Mayor Johnson was married in 1901 to Alice Leone Browand, at Ken- 
dallville, Indiana. They have two boys, Roswell B., aged ten years, and 
Richard C, now about one year of age. Mr. Johnson affiliates with the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, is a member of the University 
Club, of the Commercial Club, and the Y. M. C. A. 

Theodore C. Klotz. A former resident of Chicago, where he also 
became prominent in politics, Mr. Klotz located in Hammond in 1906, 
and while building up a large and profitable law practice has also con- 
tinued his activities as one of the leaders in the local democracy. Mr. 
Klotz has the qualifications of an able attorney, is well versed in the 
law and his experience has brought him in connection with much impor- 
tant court and office business. At the same time he has the gifts and 
personality of a public leader, and will probably go far in political 
activities. 

Theodore C. Klotz was born in Chicago October 9, 1877, a son of 
Theodore and Caroline Klotz. With a public school and college educa- 
tion, Mr. Klotz entered the Chicago Law School and graduated an LL. B. 
in 1898. He was court clerk for Col. J. W. Bennett in Chicago, and 
secretary of several democratic organizations of the old Fourteenth and 
Sixteenth wards of Chicago, and of the Young Men's Democratic Club 
of Chicago. It was at the suggestion of Judge Lawrence Becker that 
Mr. Klotz came to Hammond in 1906. For two years he served as 
assistant city attorney, and later was Judge Becker's personal bailiff in 
court No. 2 of the Superior bench. During 1910-11 he was acting secre- 
tary of the Democratic County Central Committee. 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 547 

On December 6, 1902, Mr. Klotz married Miss Helen M. DeBo, daugh- 
ter of Capt. Peter and Elizabeth DeBo. Both the children born to 
their marriage are deceased. Mr. Klotz has membership in the Chamber 
of Commerce, is a Knights Templar degree Mason, and a Shriner and 
also affiliates with the Knights of Pythias, the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, the United Order of Foresters, and the Protected Home Circle. 
He is an active member of the Hammond Saengerbund, the local Ger- 
man singing society. The local democratic society, known as the Jef- 
ferson Club, is also one of his affiliations. 

Mr. Klotz represents several of the smaller towns of Lake County 
as attorney, is secretary and treasurer of the Hammond Finance and 
Development Company, and is secretary and a member of the Frieden 
Evangelical Church. 

Dr. George Lindsay Smith. In the practice of his profession as a 
dental surgeon Doctor Smith has been identified with the City of Ham- 
mond for more than ten years, and in skill and general ability ranks 
second to none among the profession in Lake County. Doctor Smith 
has been prominent in dental societies, and is a man who has since early 
boyhood relied upon his individual efforts to advance him to success. 

Dr. George Lindsay Smith was born in "Watford, Ontario, Canada, 
June 1, 1876. His parents were substantial farming people of Ontario, 
George and Mary Ann (Thomas) Smith. Doctor Smith grew up in 
Ontario, attended the grade and the high schools, and began earning his 
living as clerk in a general store in Michigan. After that he was for one 
year with a livery and grain establishment, and in 1900 entered the 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery, working to pay most of his tuition 
while in school. Graduating with his degree as dental surgeon in 1903, 
in the same year he established an office in Hammond and long since 
acquired a clientage which takes all his time. Doctor Smith was hon- 
ored as the first president of the Lake County Dental Society, and also 
has affiliations with the Northern Indiana, the Indiana State and the 
Chicago Dental Societies. He is a Mason, with affiliations with the 
Lodge, Chapter, Knight Templar Commandery and Mystic Shrine. He 
belongs to the Hammond Country Club. 

On October 10, 1906, Doctor Smith married Edith Hammond, daugh- 
ter of Thomas and Helen Hammond, of Hammond. They are the par- 
ents of two children : Helen Elizabeth and Edith Louise. 

Thomas AVileiam Oberlin, M. D. The medical profession at Ham- 
mond has one of its ablest representatives in Dr. Thomas William 
Oberlin, who is a man of broad experience, well traveled, splendidly 
equipped professionally, and during the past fifteen years has acquired 
success and high standing in his community. 

Thomas William Oberlin was born at Mansfield, Ohio, February 1, 
1875, a son of W. K. and Catherine (Ford) Oberlin. His father was a 
lumberman. Dr. Oberlin attended the public schools of Ohio, and took 
his collegiate work in the Ohio Wesleyan University at Delaware. His 
medical studies were pursued in the medical department of the North- 
western University at Chicago, an instituiton that gave him the degree 
M. D. in 1898. Since graduating he has been identified with Hammond, 
and has a large general practice but is particularly well known as a 
specialist in children's diseases. Since locating at Hammond he inter- 
rupted his practice for post-graduate study in the Harvard Medical 



548 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

School in Boston, Massachusetts. His professional abilities commended 
him to the people of Lake County, so that for eight years he held the 
office of health commissioner. Doctor Oberlin has membership in the 
Lake County Medical Society and the Indiana State Medical Association. 
Fraternally his relations are with the Masonic Order and the Benev- 
olent and Protective Order of Elks, is a Knight Templar and Shriner 
Mason, and is past exalted ruler of the Hammond Lodge of Elks. His 
church is the Presbyterian. At Mansfield, Ohio, April 12, 1899, Doctor 
Oberlin married Duey L. Wolff. They have one child, Katherine Gray. 

Eldridge Madison Shanklin, M. I). In Hammond for the past 
eleven years one of the recognized specialists has been Dr. E. M. Shank- 
lin, whose practice is confined to diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat. 

Eldridge Madison Shanklin was born in Carroll County, Indiana, 
October 31, 1875, a son of John C. and Mary (Olds) Shanklin. His 
father was a merchant and banker and as the son of fairly prosperous 
parents, Doctor Shanklin was able to secure liberal advantages and 
opportunities for entrance to his profession. For a time he attended 
country schools, was a student in the high school at Frankfort, was in 
Hanover College, Indiana, and in April, 1902, was graduated M. I), from 
the Medical College of Indiana, Indianapolis. From the first he spe- 
cialized on diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat, and after eighteen 
months in Indianapolis moved to Hammond, where his private practice 
has been increasingly large and profitable every year. 

In 1910 Doctor Shanklin was elected coroner of Lake County, and 
served during 1910-11. He is a former president of the Lake County 
Medical Society, and for the past two years has served that body as sec- 
retary. He also has membership in the Indiana State Medical Asso- 
ciation and the Tenth District Medical Association. Doctor Shanklin 
has been assigned the task of editing "The Bulletin," the official 
organ of the Lake County society. Doctor Shanklin has for some years 
been prominent in Masonry, being a past master of the lodge, and at the 
present time holding chairs in both the chapter and commandery. He 
is a past exalted ruler of Hammond Lodge of Elks. 

In 1902 Doctor Shanklin married Adelaide Leeklider of Indianapolis. 
Their three children are Elinor, John Eldridge and James Gaylord. The 
family are members of the Presbyterian Church. 

William E. J. Kolb. For a number of years Mr. Kolb has been 
well known in the business community of Hammond, and is now serving 
as city clerk. His record as an official has been characterized by 
fidelity in performance and an obliging courtesy to all who use his 
office, and he is one of the most popular officials at the city hall. 

William E. J. Kolb was born in Chicago, June 6, 1878, a son of 
Jacob and Henrietta (Pfrommer) Kolb. His father was a hotel pro- 
prietor, a business which he prosecuted the greater part of his active 
career. The son received a public school education at Hammond, to 
which city the family moved in 1885. Subsequently he was a student 
in the Cook County Normal at Chicago, and also attended a business 
college. His first regular experience in business affairs was as a boy 
when he delivered a newspaper route for Chicago papers. That was 
followed by employment with a tea and coffee firm as head clerk and 
salesman, and in 1905 he became connected with the F. S. Betz Com- 
pany, and when he left that concern was at the head of the drug depart- 





<J$-^ 




LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 549 

ment. Mr. Kolb's official record began as collector for the city water 
department, from which place he was promoted as assistant city treas- 
urer, and on November 4, 1913, he was elected to his present office as 
city clerk for the regular term of four years. Mr. Kolb is president 
of the Hammond AY recking Company. He has membership in the 
Chamber of Commerce, with the Masonic order, the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, and the Odd Fellows Lodge, No. 676, at 
Hammond. 

At Hammond, on October 11, 1903, he married Miss Marie Koehler, 
a daughter of August and Emily Koehler. Their two children are 
Frederick August and William Herman. The family worship in the 
Lutheran faith. 

John O. Bowers. As a lawyer Mr. Bowers has been identified with 
his profession in Lake County for the past twenty years. During a 
greater part of this time his home and his office were at Hammond, and 
for twelve years he served with efficiency and honor as referee in bank- 
ruptcy for the Twelfth Referee District of Indiana. Mr. Bowers was one 
of the first private investors in the new City of Gary, where he has ac- 
quired large and substantial interests, and has had his home in that city 
for the past four years. 

A native of Bedford County, Pennsylvania, John 0. Bowers is a son 
of John and Sarah R. Bowers. Before he was a year old his father died, 
and his training devolved upon his mother. He got his early education 
by attending the public schools. Like many successful lawyers, he 
entered his profession after a long novitiate as a teacher. In 1886 he 
graduated from the State Normal School at Lock Haven, Pennsylvania. 
He spent several years as a teacher in his native state, and then came 
to Valparaiso, Indiana, and studied law in the college of that city, 
graduating in 1889. After a prospecting tour through the Northwest, 
and a brief residence at Pittsburg, Kansas, Mr. Bowers returned to 
Indiana, and took the principalship of the public schools at Whiting. 

In 1894 Mr. Bowers began the practice of law at Hammond, and 
during 1895-97 was deputy prosecuting attorney under Thomas Heard. 
After the passage of the Federal Bankruptcy Act of 1898, Judge John 
H. Baker of the United States District Court appointed Mr. Bowers 
referee in bankruptcy for the Twelfth Referee District, including the 
counties of Lake, Porter, Starke, Newton, Jasper and Pulaski, to which 
were subsequently added the counties of St. Joseph, Laporte and Mar- 
shall. Every successive two years he received reappointment to his 
office, and continued the responsible duties of referee until he resigned 
in May, 1910. During this long period of service he acquired an ex- 
tended acquaintance over all Northwest Indiana, and among the notable 
cases that came under his jurisdiction were four large bank failures 
with thousands of creditors, and he was highly commended for his legal 
ability in the decision of the many different questions and the successful 
adjustment of many complicated interests involved. While serving as 
referee he also carried on his practice at Hammond. 

As already stated, Mr. Bowers was one of the first private investors 
in real estate at the City of Gary. He began buying property there 
at the commencement of the city's growth, and has done much to improve 
his property, having constructed two well known buildings, the Indiana 
and the Juniata buildings. He has other property in that city. His 
home has been in Garv since the fall of 1910. Mr. Bowers is now a 



550 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

director of and an attorney for the International Trust and Savings Bank 
of Gary. 

On October 25, 1895, he married Nellie A. Blackmail, of Allegan, 
Michigan. The eight children born to their marriage are : Sylvan For- 
rest, Harold Eldon, Lucy Ora, deceased, Marjorie Elizabeth, John 
Oliver, Dorothy Naomi, Allen Conley, deceased, and Sherwood. Mr. 
Bowers is one of the influential members of the progressive party in 
Lake County, and in 1912 was the candidate on that ticket for Congress 
from the Tenth Congressional District. 

Peter J. Dilschneider. In the modern city no municipal service 
has been developed to a higher point of efficiency and of greater use- 
fulness to the property and welfare of citizens than the fire protection 
service. In its fire department the City of Hammond need fear com- 
parison with no other city in the Calumet region, for both in equip- 
ment and personnel it is modern and to the highest degree effective. 
The present chief of the Hammond Fire Department has been a member 
of the service for the past sixteen years, having gone in at the bottom 
and worked his way up to his present office on the basis of merit and 
constant and vigilant fidelity to his duties, and courageous conduct in 
every emergency. 

Peter J. Dilschneider was born at St. John, Lake County, Indiana, 
in 1873. His parents, John P. and Katherine Dilschneider, were among 
the old residents of this county, and his father was a shoemaker. The 
son received a public school education, and when a boy entered the 
employ of the old Spring works at Hammond, and was connected with 
that concern for fifteen years. In 1898 he entered the fire department 
as common fireman, was promoted to captain, then to assistant chief, 
and has been at the head of the department since 1901. Mr. Dil- 
schneider is a member of the International Fire Engineers' Association. 
Fraternally he affiliates with the Fraternal Order of Eagles and his 
church is St. Joseph's Catholic. 

The Hammond Savings and Trust Company. Though one of the 
more recent additions to Hammond's financial institutions, the Savings 
and Trust Company has been able to offer exceptional services to the 
business community, and has steadily prospered from the day its doors 
were first opened for business. The company was organized in May, 
1909, with an original capital of $30,000. The first officers were: 
Adam E. Ebert, president; Fred R. Mott, vice president; Frank Ham- 
mond, secretary and treasurer; and Walter H. Hammond, assistant 
secretary and treasurer. In 1911 the business justified an increase of 
capital to $50,000. At the present time, besides its capital, the company 
has a surplus of $12,500, and its deposits are $250,000. The company 
has all the facilities for the administration of trusts, operates an insur- 
ance department, and does a large business in general banking and 
savings, paying the regular rate of three per cent on savings deposits. 

Frank Hammond, secretary and treasurer of the company, is one 
of Hammond's younger business men, and a son of the late honored 
pioneer, Thomas Hammond, and his wife, Helen (Potter) Hammond. 
Frank Hammond, who was born in the City of Detroit, May 15, 1875, 
was brought to Hammond in 1877, and received his education in the 
grammar schools and high schools and the Indiana State University. 
His business career began in the auditing department of the G. H. 
Hammond Packing Company, and gradually led him into larger and 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 551 

varied responsibilities. Since his appointment, in 1901, Mr. Hammond 
has served as deputy collector of internal revenue in this district. He 
was the founder of the real estate and insurance business which with 
the organization of the Hammond Savings and Trust Company was 
taken over as a department of that new business, and he has been secre- 
tary and treasurer of the company from the beginning. Mr. Hammond 
is also secretary and treasurer of the Hammond Suburban Realty Com- 
pany, and for almost twenty years has been closely associated with 
Hammond life and business affairs. 

Mr. Hammond is a member of the Chamber of Commerce, the 
Country Club, has taken the chapter degrees in Masonry, and affiliates 
with the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks. In January, 1898, at "West Pullman, Illinois, he married 
Nellie DeBow, daughter of Lewis H. DeBow. Their four children are 
Virgene E., Alice L., Thomas D., and Dorothy G. 

Edward August Aubey. Now serving as city comptroller of Ham- 
mond, E. A. Aubry has been identified with Lake County in various 
capacities for a number of years, and always has enjoyed a reputation 
for integrity and good service in whatever relation he has sustained 
either to private business or to public affairs. 

Edward August Aubry was born at Canton, Ohio, December 24, 
1871, a son of August and Mary Aubry. His parents were substantial 
farming people, and in 1890 the family moved to White County, Indiana. 
Thus, after a public school education, which was finished while he lived 
in Ohio, Mr. Aubry followed various lines of work until August, 1895, 
and then entered the Valparaiso University, where he spent one year 
in the department of pharmacy and was graduated in 1897. His home 
has been in Lake County since 1902. After coming to Indiana he 
worked for two years in the drug business, taught school from 1892 to 
1896 and again from 1898 to 1902, and in the latter year once more 
engaged in the drug business as a pharmacist. In 1903 he became a 
clerk for the railway company at the Chicago Junction, and in 1905 
went with the Indiana Harbor Railroad at Calumet Park, remaining 
until July 1, 1906. On September 1, 1906, came his appointment as 
deputy treasurer of the City of Hammond, and he was employed in that 
service until March 9, 1911. At the latter date Mayor Smalley 
appointed Mr. Aubry city comptroller, and in 1914 he was again con- 
firmed in this position. During 1913 Mr. Aubry, as a side line, built 
the Aubry Theater at 253 Hohman Street. This is one of the small 
but handsome and well-equipped places of amusement in the city, and 
is a brick structure 25 by 116 feet, specially designed and constructed 
for purposes of a theater and seats 300 persons. 

Mr. Aubry married Mary Paschall of Rochester. Indiana, a daugh- 
ter of Henry and Rachel Paschall, her father having been a farmer. 
They are members of the All Saints Church, and since 1898 he has 
been affiliated with the Knights of the Maccabees, belongs to the 
Knights of Columbus, and is an active member of the Hammond Cham- 
ber of Commerce. 

American Trust and Savings Bank of Hammond. There is per- 
haps no surer index to the remarkable commercial development of the 
Calumet region than is illustrated by its financial institutions. Few 
of these have long years to give them prestige, yet on the score of 



552 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

resources, presidential management and business service they stand to 
better advantage than many older concerns. An excellent example of 
these newer financial houses is the American Trust and Savings Bank 
of Hammond. 

July 15, 1911, the bank was opened for business, having passed 
through the preliminary stages of organization by men who are officers 
and directors at the present time. The cash capital paid in was $100,- 
000, with a large deposit on the opening clay. The business has stead- 
ily increased until at the present time the assets are over $400,000. 
The first day's business was a favorable augury of the continued success 
of this firm. 

This prosperity has been due to the untiring efforts of the directors 
and employees, who are some of Hammond's foremost business men, 
including O. A. Krinbill; Charles H. Mayer, vice president; J. E. 
Brennan; Emil Minas; William J. McAleer, the president; George B. 
Sheerer; Anton H. Tapper; Carl Bauer; Daniel Brawn; H. M. John- 
son, the secretary; H. O. Reissig, the assistant secretary; and Edward 
Eggerbrecbt, the teller. 

The bank is housed in the Henderson Building at 182 East State 
Street. This is a two-story brick building, which previously had con- 
tained storerooms, with apartments on the second floor. The banking 
fixtures are of golden oak, with white tile floor, and another convenient 
room is just off the lobby. The vault is of Herring-Hall-Marvin 
Company make, and is constructed entirely of steel, with solid steel 
walls, ceiling and floor, which makes it one of the most secure vaults 
in the State of Indiana. The outer doors of the vault alone weigh 
seven tons each, and the shipping weight of the vault entire was sixty- 
five tons. The foundation on which the vault rests is a solid block of 
concrete six feet in depth. There are 2,250 safety deposit vaults, all 
equipped with master-key and combination locks. Other facilities 
include the bond and document safe, and filing cabinet and book racks 
in the interior of the vault. 

Henry Otto Reissig. One of the young men who typify and give 
energy to modern commerce in Hammond is H. O. Reissig, of the 
American Trust and Savings Bank. Still in his twenties, he has proved 
his usefulness and has a promising career ahead. 

A native of Lake County, Henry Otto Keissig was born March 22, 
1887, a son of Henry and Margaret Reissig. His father has been for 
a number of years, and still is, connected with a wholesale grocery 
house in this city. Mr. Reissig received his education in the public 
schools at Hobart, attended a business college, and with this preliminary 
equipment spent one year with a firm of wholesale grocers, and then 
entered banking as clerk and bookkeeper with the First National Bank 
of Hammond. Later he served the Citizens German National Bank as 
bookkeeper and teller, and in July, 1911, with the organization of the 
American Trust and Savings Bank, identified himself with that insti- 
tution as paying teller, and later was made assistant secretary. 
Mr. Reissig also has other business relations, and is secretary of the 
Hammond Brass Works. On April 6, 1910, he married Anna M. 
Mayer, a daughter of C. H. Mayer of Hammond. They are the parents 
of one child, Orville Arthur. The church of which they are members 
is the Lutheran, and both are well known in Hammond social circles. 




/ %^4vtri\ 



u> & 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 553 

Thomas Joseph Toner, M. D. Doctor Toner began practice at Gary, 
October 24, 1908. Each- succeeding year has witnessed an increase of 
his success and prestige as a physician and surgeon, and latterly his 
time and energies have been taken up chiefly by his growing surgical 
practice. Doctor Toner's training and practice have given him excep- 
tional qualifications for his chosen work and he enjoys the full con- 
fidence of his patrons and his place in community esteem is secure. 

Thomas Joseph Toner was born on a farm near Kenosha, Wisconsin, 
February 3, 1876. His parents were Charles and Ellen (Rategan) 
Toner. His early education was finished in the Kenosha High School, 
and before and during his student days in medicine he was a successful 
teacher. Doctor Toner taught in the Kenosha public schools and later 
in Cook County, Illinois, and the City of Chicago. From the means 
secured by this work he prosecuted his studies in medicine at the North- 
western University of Chicago and was graduated M. D. in 1906. Two 
years were spent as an interne at the Michael Reese Hospital of Chi- 
cago, and with this broad and thorough training Doctor Toner came to 
Gary and has been successful from the very start. In 1913 Doctor 
Toner spent two months in the clinics of Europe. 

Doctor Toner has membership in the Gary and County Medical 
societies, in the Indiana State Medical Association, the American Medical 
Association, and the Chicago Medical Society. He also belongs to the 
Gary University Club, is a member of the Board of Health, and takes 
an active interest in the public health movement both in his own com- 
munity and as an important subject of both local and national concern. 

Walter Blakesley Conkey. The W. B. Conkey Company was 
one of the industries which moved to Hammond at a time when that 
city was making special efforts to increase the scope of its industrial 
field, and since locating there its payroll has been one of the steadiest 
and most valuable assets of the working community. In the field of 
printing, bookmaking and general publishing, the W. B. Conkey Com- 
pany is easily one of the largest and best known in the entire country. 
Its organization and facilities have been directed along one special line 
and for the primary purpose of rapid edition printing and binding of 
books and catalogues in large quantities. During the thirty-five years 
of its history this company has manufactured catalogues for nearly 
every large mercantile establishment in the country, and has printed 
some of the largest books and most extensive editions ever turned out. 

The plant covers nearly eight acres of ground, and is located in a 
park of nearly twenty acres, surrounded with trees and shrubbery, and 
the construction and general facilities within the plan and the environ- 
ment are such as to class this as one of the most satisfactory manufac- 
turing plants in the entire country. The building is absolutely fire- 
proof, is equipped with every device and machine for printing and book- 
making, and the employees have every sanitary facility that the science 
of modern business can supply. The W. B. Conkey Companv at 
Hammond represents an investment of about $1,000,000, about fifteen 
hundred persons are on its payroll, and the annual amount paid out in 
wages and salaries is more than a third of a million dollars. 

The business is the product of the originality and enterprise of 
one man, Walter Blakeslev Conkey. Mr. Conkey was born at Sterling, 
Ontario, July 13, 1858, a son of Willard and Emma (Blakesley) Con- 
key. With a public school education, he learned the trade of printer 

Vol. II— G 



554 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

in Chicago, and as a very young man started in business on his own 
account and with a very small job office. He is himself a practical 
printer, but early in his career turned over the technical details to 
others while he looked after the executive end, and kept increasing his 
plant, adding new departments, until the incorporation of the W. B. 
Conkey Company, of which he has been president from the start. The 
general offices of the company are in Hammond, Indiana, and branches 
are maintained in Chicago and New York. 

Mr. Conkey is president of the Fraiiklin Printing and Publishing 
Company and the Automatic Justitier Company, and was for twelve 
years a director and six years president of the Illinois Manufacturers' 
Association. He is a member of the Society of the Sons of the Amer- 
ican Revolution and of the Society of Colonial Wars. His home is in 
Hammond, where he has membership in the Hammond City Club, and 
in Chicago in the Union League, the Chicago Athletic, South Shore, 
Chicago Automobile, and the Chicago Press clubs. He is also a mem- 
ber of the Aldine Club of New York. He is a Knight Templar Mason 
and a member of the Shrine. Mr. Conkey married Kate Phillips, and 
their children are Walter, Henry, and Jane P. 

Peter Austgen. The present chief of Hammond police has won 
his promotion on merit, and has a splendid record as an administrative 
and executive official, entrusted with the direction of the forces which 
maintain law and order in a large city. 

Peter Austgen was born April 5, 1871, at St. John, in Lake County, 
a son of John and Katie (Bohr) Austgen. His father was a farmer, 
and the son grew up on a farm until he was nineteen years of age, in 
the meantime attending the Schererville public schools. When Peter 
Austgen came to Hammond he found employment in the rolling mills 
and spent three and a half years in one of the departments of nail 
manufacture. In 1895 he entered the employment of the Hammond 
company, but after a year and a half he went to work as a motorman 
for the Hammond, Whiting & East Chicago Railway Company. At 
the end of about four years he resigned his work as a motorman, and 
on February 6, 1900, began his duties as patrolman on the police force. 
After six years in the ranks he was promoted to sergeant, two years 
later was made captain, and in 1909 was raised to chief of police, and 
that honor came to him unsolicited and as a direct tribute to his previous 
record for courageous and successful accomplishment of every duty 
assigned him. 

Mr. Austgen affiliates with the Knights of Columbus and the Modern 
Woodmen of America, and worships in St. Joseph's Church. He mar- 
ried, in July, 1900, Miss Mattie Stockberger, of Rochester, Indiana, a 
daughter of George B. and Julia Stockberger. Her father was a 
farmer. The three children of Mr. Austgen and wife are Margaret 
Mary, Harold Peter, and Robert Peter. 

Hon. Thomas Hammond. To say that "an institution is but the 
lengthened shadow of a man" is one way of defining the influences and 
splendid results which have flowed from the original enterprise and 
character of the men who created the industrial community of Ham- 
mond about forty years ago. It was on the solid foundation laid by 
the pioneers that the modern complexity of industries, commercial 
houses, the schools and churches and other institutions, and the thou- 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 555 

sands of homes, has been reared. No community can afford to ignore 
or forget to honor its founders, and it has been well said that those 
who care not for history of cities or of ancestry lack a great part of the 
foundation and the motives of right and worthy living. The growing 
prosperity of the present rests upon the solid foundation laid by those 
who have gone before. 

_ An early associate with his brother, George H. Hammond, in the 
original industry of the city of that name, three times elected mayor, 
and at one time congressman from this district, for many years one of 
the leading bankers, the late Thomas Hammond deserves a record of 
memory in these pages, not only for these various activities, but also 
for the splendid quality of citizenship and manhood which he exem- 
plified during nearly thirty-five years of continuous residence. It has 
been well said that Hammond was fortunate in having such a man in 
both its early and later years of development. It often happens that 
a community is largely the result of the lives and activities of a small 
group of men, and among those who chiefly influenced the early history 
and the pioneer development of Hammond the name of Thomas Ham- 
mond must always have a prominent place. Hammond still bears in 
its commercial organization and energy the impress of the character 
and influence of Mr. Hammond, who will long be remembered as a 
business builder, a civic leader and a man of splendid personal char- 
acter. 

Thomas Hammond was born February 27, 1843, in Ashburnham, 
Massachusetts, and died at his beautiful home in Hammond on Septem- 
ber 21, 1909. His early education was acquired in his native village. 
and the business experience of his youth brought him to the City of 
Detroit, Michigan, where for some time he conducted a retail meat 
market. He prospered in a steady and quiet way, but the successful 
achievement of his career was reserved for the pioneer city of the 
Calumet region. He was thirty-two years of age when, in 1875, he 
came to the Town of Hammond and went into business in connection 
with the G. H. Hammond Packing Company. He came to the city 
when it was nothing more than a village and when no one dreamed 
that the desolate waste of sand would ever be a great city. His early 
business was in utilizing the by-products of the G. H. Hammond Com- 
pany, which was then a young but progressive industry, established as 
one of the pioneer plants at a time when the packing business was in 
its infancy. Mr. Hammond, from the major products of the plant, 
bought casings and tripe and manufactured them into salable pro- 
visions. The credit is given to Thomas Hammond for first demon- 
strating the fact that tripe is edible and that it has many ingredients 
which greatly aid digestion. Mr. Hammond became assistant superin- 
tendent of the Hammond Packing Company, but when George H. Ham- 
mond sold out his interests in the company, his brother followed his 
example. 

The chief source of his fortune — and at one time he was reputed 
to be the wealthiest man in Hammond — came- from real estate invest- 
ments. In 1888 he and S. F. Fogg bought a large acreage in the eastern 
portion of Hammond, along State Street and Plummer Avenue and 
Sibley Street, and opened it as the Fogg & Hammond's First and 
Second Addition to the city. This land was sold in the prosperous 
times that preceded the panic of 1893. and subsequently Mr. Hammond 
acquired all the remaining interests of Mr. Fogg in the property. He 



556 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

was one of the first stockholders of the Commercial Bank of Hammond, 
and for sixteen years served as its president. Under his management 
the bank grew until it was one of the powers in the financial affairs of 
the Calumet region. For a number of years it was the largest bank 
in the city, and its supremacy continued until the First National Bank 
was finally taken over by local capitalists, reorganized, and then on his 
sixty-sixth birthday, in 1909, a consolidation was effected by which the 
Commercial Bank was taken over by the First National, and at that 
date Thomas Hammond formally retired from business, though he con- 
tinued as vice president of the First National Bank until his death. 

While his success as a business man is a primary consideration in 
his career, Mr. Hammond also had a prominent part in public affairs. 
He was three times elected mayor, in 1888, 1890 and 1892. While 
mayor of the city he realized the necessity of a better water supply 
than could be furnished from artesian wells then in use, and under his 
leadership Hammond established its present water system, which is in 
the nature of a monument to his public spirit. In 1892 Thomas Ham- 
mond was elected to Congress to represent the Tenth Indiana District, 
and retired from the office of mayor in order to go to Washington and 
represent his constituency, continuing one term. He was one of the 
few democratic Congressmen ever elected from that district. As a 
matter of civic duty, he afterwards accepted the nomination and was 
elected a councilman from the Second Ward of this city. He was 
president of the Hammond Land and improvement Company, a con- 
cern which was the means of locating the W. B. Conkey Company's 
plant in Hammond. 

With this brief outline of his business and public activities, some- 
thing must be said concerning his individual character, and the follow- 
ing editorial appreciation written at the time of his death is only a 
just tribute to this pioneer Hammond citizen: 

"We love to think of Mr. Hammond as a man. The business pur- 
suits of successful men are but incidental to the most important con- 
siderations in their lives. They would be the same men if circum- 
stances had opened different spheres. Mr. Hammond would have been 
the same kind of a man had he lived in any other city in the Union. 
Mr. Hammond was an honest man. When a man is named by some 
striking characteristic of his life, it is an evidence of the regard of the 
people, and unconsciously it is the highest tribute a man can receive 
from his friends and acquaintances. Mr. Hammond was called 'Honest 
Tom.' The men who sat with him in the city council, and have been 
the most closely associated with him in business relations, read into 
this 'new name' the deepest meaning. Mr. Hammond was a Christian 
gentleman. He was a gentleman naturally. Boorishness, snobbishness 
or aristocratic exclusiveness would have seemed the most out of place 
in his make-up of anything defective in human character that could 
be thought of. He was a Christian gentleman, not merely because he 
was affiliated with the Baptist Church, neither in spite of the fact, but 
because the church represented the higher motives which should govern 
the conduct of every man who performs his relationships on earth is 
related to every other man on earth, and holds kinship with God." 

Another expressive estimate of the place Thomas Hammond held 
in his home city is contained in the following words: "Thomas Ham- 
mond has crossed 'that river from which no voyager ever returns,' but 
during his sojourn among us he has put down some markings that 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 557 

eternity alone can eradicate. These are his deeds, the things that 
never die. His first landmark was laid down when his intrinsic man- 
hood was brought to the public eye, winning the people's confidence 
until they chose him not only to represent this city but the state. The 
markings which he has left us might be summed up — the man of the 
people, the financier, the philanthropist and the man whose presence 
was in his home. In all of those he has distinguished himself as one of 
your foremost and greatest citizens. This day marks the close of an 
eventful and useful life, the last days of which were a revelation of 
the man's great heart and soul. His only thought seemed to be the 
best interests of his family. Never was more greatness of a father 
and companion expressed than that which he expressed. He was 
patient to the last degree, he believed in his family, his fellowmen and 
best in his God." 

The cultivated tastes of the late Mr. Hammond were well shown 
in the architecture and furnishings of his beautiful home on South 
Hohman Street. He personally designed and drew the plans for that 
building, and it was for many years regarded as the finest residence 
in the city, and while some later ones may have cost more, none excelled 
it for beauty and the delightfulness of its home atmosphere. Thomas 
Hammond married Miss Helen Potter at Leominster, Massachusetts. 
Their children are: Lizzie E., who died in 1892; Mrs. W. A. Hill; 
Walter H. Hammond, who died on the 23d of May, 1914 ; Prank Ham- 
mond; and Mrs. G. L. Smith. Mrs. Hammond, who still has an active 
place in Hammond social circles, has long been prominent in the Baptist 
Church, is a generous giver to public charity, and since the death of 
her husband has continued to maintain the fine dignity and culture so 
long associated with the Hammond homestead in that city. 

William A. Hill. For many years actively identified with educa- 
tional work, and long connected with the Hammond public schools, 
William A. Hill transferred his abilities from education to business, 
and as secretary and treasurer of the United Boiler Heating and Foun- 
dry Company is a responsible executive in one of Hammond's welt 
known and prosperous industries. 

Born in the Township of Bruce, McComb County, Michigan, in 
1863, a son of substantial farming people, Jacob and Fannie (Dickin- 
son) Hill. William A. Hill received his early training in the public 
schools at Morrice, Michigan, and subsequently was a student of the 
Valparaiso University in Indiana and of the University of Chicago. 
His career as an educator covered nineteen years, fifteen years of which 
were spent in the Hammond schools. In 1913 Mr. Hill became secre- 
tary and treasurer of the United Boiler Heating and Foundry Com- 
pany. For a number of years he served as a director of the Lake 
County Title and Guaranty Company. He has also had an active part 
in republican politics, was secretary of the Hammond Republican Cen- 
tral Committee two years, and was his party's candidate for the office 
of county treasurer. 

Mr. Hill is a member of the Hammond Chamber of Commerce, 
affiliates with the Masons through the lodge and chapter degrees, and 
also belongs to the Royal League. He and his family belongs to the 
Baptist Church, and he is a treasurer of the Hammond church of that 
denomination. 



558 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

In 1898 Mr. Hill married Carrie Hammond, a daughter of Thomas 
and Helen (Potter) Hammond. Their three children are Irving H., 
Pauline E., and Adelaide H. 

United Boiler Heating and Foundry Company. This Hammond 
industry, manufacturing gray iron castings, boilers, tanks, plate and 
sheet iron construction, and dealers in complete house heating equip- 
ment, was incorporated in 1909 with a capital stock of $20,000. The 
present organization is an outgrowth of the original Hammond Boiler 
Works and North Star Foundry. The Hammond Boiler Works was 
established in 1899 at Blue Island, Illinois, but was removed to Ham- 
mond in 1902. The North Star Foundry has a history of ten years, 
having been established in 1904, and both enterprises have been greatly 
expanded since the consolidation under the present company. 

The present executive officials of the United Boiler Heating and 
Foundry Company are : W. C. McEwen, president ; George B. Shearer, 
vice president; and W. A. Hill, secretary and treasurer. The company 
employs an average of twenty-five workmen and occupies a factory 
building with 250 feet of frontage by 100 feet in depth. Have a com- 
plete equipment of machinery and other facilities for their manufac- 
turing, and their goods are now distributed over a large territory about 
Hammond. 

J. E. Metcalf, M. D. Both in the broad field of citizenship and in 
devotion to the interests of his profession, Doctor Metcalf has had a 
useful and successful career since beginning practice fifteen years ago, 
and is regarded as one of the ablest physicians and surgeons of the City 
of Gary, which has been his home for six years. Doctor Metcalf is 
serving as president of the Board of Health, and his interests and efforts 
have been given at the expense of his private practice to promoting 
public health and educating the people of his community to better 
standards of sanitation and correct living. 

Doctor Metcalf was born at Anderson, Indiana, a son of Stephen 
and Carrie M. Metcalf. His father has for many years been a news- 
paper man of Anderson. After his public school training, J. E. Metcalf 
entered the University of Indiana, was graduated A. B. in 1893, and 
was prepared for his profession in the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons at Chicago, which gave him the degree M. D. in 1899. This was 
followed by two years of interne experience in the West Side Hospital, 
and he first opened an office for independent practice at Fenimore, 
Wisconsin, four years later moved out to Kansas and was in practice 
at Salina two years, and on January 6, 1908, arrived at Gary. He has 
given his time and energy to a general practice and is the regular phy- 
sician for many of the best families in the city. 

In 1901 Doctor Metcalf married Lura G. Kightlinger of Yates City, 
Illinois. Their one son is Stephen. Doctor Metcalf is a charter mem- 
ber of both the Masonic Lodge and the Elks Club at Gary, and also 
belongs to the Gary Commercial Club. His popularity among members 
of his profession is indicated by his present office as president of the 
Gary Medical Society, as vice president of the Lake County Medical 
Society, as president of the Tenth District Medical Society, and he 
also has membership in the Indiana State Medical Association and the 
American Medical Association. Doctor Metcalf has been a member of 
the vestry of Christ's Episcopal Church at Gary since it was estab- 
lished. 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 559 

Milo M. Bruce was bom February 10, 1873, in Winainac, Indiana, 
a son of Daniel and Sarah E. (Hizer) Bruce. His parents were farm- 
ing people, and the son grew up in the country, attended public school 
and had ambition for larger things. He took a teacher's course at the 
Ladoga Normal School, Ladoga, Indiana, attended the National Normal 
University at Lebanon, Ohio, entered the law department of the Uni- 
versity of Michigan and graduated in 1894. 

In 1893 he and his brother, Otto J. Bruce, formed the law firm of 
Bruce & Bruce for the general practice of law, opening an office at 
Crown Point, and the following year the firm established another law 
office at Hammond, with Milo M. Bruce in charge. This partnership 
became one of the best known legal firms in Lake County and existed 
for sixteen years, when it was dissolved by mutual agreement, he con- 
tinuing in charge of the Hammond office to the present time. 

Mr. Bruce married Agnes M. Terry of Winamac, Indiana. He 
is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and belongs to a num- 
ber of local orders. 

Elmer D. Brandenburg. At Hammond, where he located in 1903, 
Mr. Brandenburg has for the past eleven years conducted a successful 
law practice, has also engaged in real estate and insurance as an impor- 
tant department of his business, and is one of the men of high standing 
in the Lake County bar, and his substantial attainments, creditable 
work and influence deserves recognition among the representative citi- 
zens. 

Elmer D. Brandenburg was born at Harrisburg, Ohio, October 13, 
1871. His parents were John W. and Eliza J. (England) Branden- 
burg. His father, who was born in Kentucky, was a son of Patterson 
C. Brandenburg, a Kentucky farmer who lived to be ninety-eight years 
of age. John W. Brandenburg, in Ohio, had a sawmill and operated 
a threshing outfit, came to Indiana in 1881, lived at "Winamac until 
1898, and then located in Hammond. During the Civil war he saw 
three years' service in Company F of the Thirteenth Indiana Infantry. 
He and his wife were the parents of four children. 

The public schools of Columbus, Ohio, and of Winamac, Indiana, 
gave Elmer D. Brandenburg his early education, and in 1898 he grad- 
uated in law from the University of Indianapolis, being admitted to 
the bar the same year. His first practice was in Gas City, Grant 
County, Indiana, and for two years he was deputy prosecuting attorney 
of that county. On moving to Hammond, in February, 1903, he engaged 
in a successful business in the law, and has made his position secure as 
a lawyer and citizen. 

For a number of years Mr. Brandenburg regularly supported the 
republican party, but in 1912 became one of the enthusiastic leaders 
of the new political organization, the progressive party, and is now 
secretary of the Lake County progressive party. He affiliates with the 
Knights of Pythias, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and the 
Tribe of Ben Hur. Belongs to the Chamber of Commerce and the Lake 
County Bar Association. On December 24, 1912, he married Adeline 
Miller of Hammond. 

Andrew William Smith, M. D. While Doctor Smith has been 
identified with the Hammond medical fraternity less than a year, his 
previous experience and associations and his thorough equipment for 



560 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

his work have enabled him quickly to gain a foothold, and he is already 
launched on his professional career. 

Andrew William Smith was born in Fredonia, Kansas, December 9, 
1886, a son of Samuel M. and Evelyn (Taylor) Smith. His father 
was a stock farmer and the son grew up in the country, attended the 
common schools, and later earned his way by work in the oil fields and 
also in a glass factory. From his own earnings he paid the tuition of 
his higher education, and finally entered the University of Michigan, 
where he continued his studies in the literary and medical department 
until graduating M. D. in 1912. For some months following his grad- 
uation he remained to assist in the department of athletics, especially 
with the football team, and in 1913 went to Buffalo, New York, as house 
surgeon for the Buffalo Hospital. Doctor Smith located in Hammond 
in September, 1913, and does a general practice. He was recently 
appointed medical examiner and physical director for the Hammond 
public schools. Doctor Smith has membership in the Country Club, 
and is a Phi Alpha Gamma of the University of Michigan. 

"Wallace J. O'Keefe. Since 1912 engaged in the practice of den- 
tistry at Hammond, Doctor O'Keefe is a native of this part of Indiana, 
was for a number of years engaged in educational work, and has already 
become well established in his profession at Hammond. 

Wallace J. O'Keefe was born in Michigan City, Indiana, July 11, 
1884, a son of substantial farming people, Peter and Mary O'Keefe. 
With a public school education and a course in the "Valparaiso Univer- 
sity, from which he graduated in 1902, Doctor O'Keefe began his 
career as a teacher, and was employed in the schoolroom for five years, 
from 1902 to 1907. Then entering the Chicago Dental College, he con- 
tinued his work until graduating D. D. S. in 1911. His first practice in 
his profession was in Chicago, but in 1912 he came to Hammond and 
has since built up a good practice and has a well appointed office and 
has all the equipment which the modern dentist requires for successful 
and skillful work. 

Doctor O'Keefe and family are members of the All Saints Church, 
and he has membership in the Knights of Columbus. On January 29. 
1913, he married Claire Hannon, a daughter of John and Johanna 
Hannon, farming people of Kouts, Indiana. 

John Edward McGarry. The phrase "McGarry jeweler" is one 
that all Hammond recognizes, and is significant of everything reliable 
and satisfactory in the way of jewelry and expert optical service in 
testing eyes and making glasses to order, and there is hardly a com- 
munity in Lake County where articles from this establishment are not 
to be found. Mr. McGarry is an expert in his line, is a trade builder on 
the basis of square dealing and satisfactory service, and is one of the 
most popular merchants and citizens of Hammond. 

John Edward McGarry is a native of Chicago, born June 3, 1878, a 
son of John A. and Martha (Meinhardt) McGarry. His father was 
an inventor, and no doubt the son has inherited some of the fine skill 
exhibited in the business which has taken his time for so many years. 
Mr. McGarry attended both public and private schools in Chicago, and 
since boyhood has depended on his own resources and has built his career 
with his own efforts and ambition. For some time he was connected 
with the Adams Express Company and was the company's agent in 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 561 

the stock yards district at Chicago. One year was spent in the broker- 
age business, but in the meantime his determination was set upon the 
jeweler's trade, and he was studying along that line in all his spare 
hours. For a time he was a student of medicine, but gave up that 
profession for one more in harmony with his tastes. Mr. McGarry, 
though still a young man, has had an exceedingly wide experience 
throughout the United States, and for seven years was a traveling sales- 
man and carried goods and made records of sales in almost every state 
and territory of the Union. In 1905 he came to Hammond and opened 
his present jewelry business, at first in a partnership, but later acquired 
the entire stock. Mr. McGarry has been so long identified with the 
jewelry trade, and has an acquaintance so extended over the various 
states that he could hardly have failed to succeed in almost any locality 
chosen for setting up a business, but has peculiar reasons for satisfac- 
tion with Hammond as a business center. A number of years ago he 
acquired practically all the local work of inspection of railway watches, 
and that is now an important branch of his business. 

For three years Mr. McGarry was chairman of the Business Men's 
Association of Hammond, and has membership in the Chamber of Com- 
merce, the Hammond Country Club, the Catholic Order of Foresters, 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, is a charter member of 
the L. 0. 0. M., a charter member of Shields Council of the Knights of 
Columbus in Chicago, and belongs to the Hammond Saengerbund. His 
church is All Saints. 

Mr. McGarry was married June 1, 1904, in Chicago to Catherine 
Farrell, and their family of four children are Mary Catherine, John 
Thomas, Edward Vincent, and Eunice Elizabeth. 

George H. Manlove. While Gary is typically an industrial city, it 
also has its full quota of professional men, and some of the ablest rep- 
resentatives of the bar and medicine and other vocations have located 
here and gained success. One of the oldest lawyers, considered with 
respect to the age of Gary itself, is George H. Manlove, whose practice 
at Gary extends over a period of seven years, practically the entire life 
of the city, and who has won many of the better distinctions and rewards 
in the legal field. Like many of his associates in professional affairs, 
Mr. Manlove never allows himself to be behindhand in public spirit, 
and is a constant booster and upholder of Gary's progress and pros- 
perity. 

Born in Chicago, Illinois, June 3, 1870, George H. Manlove has spent 
most of his career in Indiana, having moved to Richmond in 1882 and 
in 1892 to Alexandria in Madison County, Indiana, Mr. Manlove grad- 
uated from the public schools of Richmond, and later was a student in 
Earlham College in that city. Admitted to the bar in 1898, he did some 
professional work in Illinois, but lived and practiced at Alexandria the 
greater part of the time until January 2, 1908, when he arrived at Gary 
and established himself as a lawyer of the growing city. 

Mr. Manlove is a director in the Northern State Bank of Gary, and 
has been one of the active leaders in local republican politics. He served 
as chairman of the township committee in 1908 and as chairman of the 
city committee in 1909. While living in Madison County, Indiana, he 
held the office of deputy prosecuting attorney. In 1909 Mr. Manlove 
was elected the first city attorney of Gary, serving a short time in that 



562 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

office. He was appointed city comptroller in January, 1914, and is still 
acting in that capacity in the present city administration. 

In 1909, Mr. Manlove married Bertha A. Hankins of Coffeyville, 
Kansas, and they are the parents of two sons. Mr. Manlove affiliates 
with the Masonic Lodge and the Royal Arch Chapter and the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks, and is one of the enthusiastic members 
of the Gary Commercial Club. 

George Drackert. For his length of service as an active business 
man and his prominent relations with several large financial and indus- 
trial enterprises, George Drackert stands as one of the pillars of Ham- 
mond's commerce and industry. His has been a career in which good 
judgment, industry and determination have effected a continuous 
progress from the position of a common workman to effective leadership 
in affairs. 

A little more than half a century ago George Drackert was born in 
the locality where the great City of Hammond has since grown up. 
His birth occurred October 14, 1863, a son of substantial farming peo- 
ple, Joseph and Salome Drackert. His father, who was born at Biblitz, 
Germany, came to America in 1856, and after a year in New Jersey 
emigrated out to Lake County and settled down as a fanner. George 
Drackert as a boy attended the country schools of his locality, and at 
an early age began earning his own way. The one big institution at 
Hammond during his boyhood was the G. H. Hammond Packing Com- 
pany, and he was one of the minor employes there from 1876 until 
1886. On August 26, 1886, George Drackert joined with C. H. Mayer, 
another prominent old-timer in Hammond business affairs, and estab- 
lished a small plant for the manufacture of bottled goods. That is one 
of the oldest continuous industries in Hammond, and in January, 1913, 
the C. H. Mayer & Company was incorporated, with George Drackert 
as president. Another concern to which his energies and ability have 
brought success is the Hammond Ice Company, which was organized 
December 7, 1907, with Mr. Drackert as secretary and treasurer, offices 
which he still holds. Mr. Drackert is a director of the Hammond 
Asphalt Products Company, was at one time a director of the American 
Trust and Savings Bank, is a director of the Becker-Tapper Realty 
Company, director of the East State Realty Company, a stockholder in 
the Hammond Savings and Trust Company. 

"While his business career has been best known, he has not neglected 
civic affairs. Mr. Drackert served four years in the city council, and 
for the past six years has been a member of the Metropolitan State Police 
Commission. Fraternally he is affiliated with the American Order of 
Foresters. Mr. Drackert married Julia Wirtz of Crown Point. Their 
two children are Edwin Hammond and Beulah, a student in the National 
Kindergarten of Chicago. 

Guy C. White. A member of the Hammond bar, Guy C. AVhite 
has been practicing in that city since 1907, and possessing undoubted 
talents as a lawyer, the industry and energy which are the prerequisites 
of success in the profession, has in seven years securely established 
himself in the city and is regarded by many as one of the ablest younger 
lawyers of Hammond. 

Guy C. White was born in Washington County, Iowa, April 13, 
1881, a son of Addison and Rebecca (Lewis) White. His father was 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 563 

a farmer, and his early youth was spent on a farm, with attendance in 
the local schools. Later he attended a normal school, also the Highland 
Park College, and while earning his own way he studied law in an office 
in Davenport, Iowa, and finally entered the Valparaiso University of 
Indiana, where he graduated in the law course in June, 1907. Admitted 
to the bar in the same year, he established his office at Hammond, and 
has since given his attention to a general practice, both civil and crimi- 
nal. For two years he served as deputy prosecuting attorney for the 
thirty-first judicial circuit. 

Mr. White is a member of the Hammond Country Club, affiliates 
with the Knights of Pythias and the L. 0. 0. M., and is a member of 
the Lake County Bar Association. 

Max Fenimore Allaben. One of the younger attorneys of the 
Hammond bar, Max F. Allaben has already found his opportunities 
and made excellent use of his time and advantages while in the city, 
and is regarded as one of the rising and most promising attorneys. 

He was born in Polo, Illinois, February 22, 1885, a son of James W. 
and Vernon (Baker) Allaben. His father was also an attorney at law, 
and practiced successfully in Illinois for many years. The son was 
given a liberal education, and entered upon his profession with unusual 
advantages of training and preparation. After graduating from the 
Polo High School in 1903, he went east and was a student at Amherst 
College, Massachusetts, where he took his bachelor of arts degree in 
1907. Returning to Illinois, he matriculated in the law department of 
the Northwestern University in Chicago, and was graduated with the 
class of 1910 and admitted to the Illinois bar after examination in 
June of the same year. His first two years as a lawyer were spent in 
Illinois, and in 1912 he was admitted to the Indiana bar and located 
and opened his office in Hammond. His offices are in the First National 
Bank Building. He affiliates with the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows. 

Mr. Allaben was married on April 29, 1914, to Miss Flora Elizabeth 
Solfisburg, of Aurora, 111. They reside at 8 West Ruth Street, Ham- 
mond, Indiana. 

Lincoln V. Cravens. Since coming to Lake County and locating in 
Hammond on January 4, 1909, Mr. Cravens has identified himself 
prominently with local public affairs, in a business way, and continuous 
practice of the law, a profession in which he has had a successful career 
for more than twenty-five years. Mr. Cravens came to Hammond from 
Madison, Indiana, where he was long prominent in politics and in his 
profession. 

Born at Vienna, Indiana, April 4, 1861, Lincoln V. Cravens was 
a son of Vincent and Minerva A. (Read) Cravens. His father was 
a merchant. The son acquired a public school education and later took 
his literary courses in Hanover College of Indiana, graduating in 
1885. After being admitted to the bar, he moved out to Scott City, 
Kansas, where he successfully practiced until January, 1893, and then 
returned to Indiana and located at Madison. During his residence in 
the latter city he served as deputy prosecuting attorney and for four 
years as city attorney. While in Scott City he was elected and gave 
four years of service in the office of prosecuting attorney. In Kansas 
he was chairman of the Scott County Republican Central Committee 
in 1892 and its secretary in 1890. 



564 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

Mr. Cravens organized and is president of the Hammond Finance 
and Development Company, which does a large business in making loans 
on realty in the city and vicinity. Mr. Cravens is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, belongs to the Hammond Chamber of 
Commerce, and is active in fraternal matters. He is a Knights Templar 
Mason, also belongs to the Consistory of the thirty-second degree Scot- 
tish Rite, and the Mystic Shrine. He served as Grand Master of the 
Grand Lodge of Indiana in 1906, and is a trustee of the Grand Lodge. 
Mr. Cravens has one son, William H. 

Onis 0. Melton, M. D. At the age of thirty Doctor Melton has 
found his work and is practicing with unusual success and prestige 
in the City of Hammond. Doctor Melton's has been a self-made career 
in the best sense of that term, and his present attainments are the more 
creditable for the fact that as a boy and young man, in order to get a 
college education and equip himself for his chosen vocation, he accepted 
any opportunity for honorable work in order to earn a living and get 
the surplus means which his economy spared, and thus at the age of 
twenty-six was ready to take up the regular work of medicine. 

Onis 0. Melton was born at Bloomington, Indiana, November 2, 
1884, a son of Donald and Alice (Wright) Melton. His father was a 
railway locomotive engineer. The son attended the public schools of 
Bedford, Indiana, later the Louisville High School in Kentucky and 
his studies in medicine were pursued in the University of Louisville 
until he graduated M. D. in 1910. As a boy, in order to get the money 
necessary for his education, he worked on a farm, in a lumber mill, in a 
confectionary store, had a newspaper route for a time, and was clerk in 
a railway yards. After graduating from medical college Dr. Melton 
served as resident physician of the Louisville City Hospital, and that 
provided exceptional opportunities for experience, since it had a capacity 
for five hundred patients and every member of the staff was taxed with 
duties to the full limit of his time and energy. Doctor Melton held 
his position with the hospital for two years, and then for one year was 
in charge of the Hunter Mineral Springs at Kramer, Indiana. In 1912 
he established his office at Hammond and has since had a general practice. 
Doctor Melton has membership in the Lake County Medical Society and 
the Indiana, the Tenth District and the American Medical Association. 

Oh October 8, 1912, he married Adelaide Waltring, of Louisville, 
daughter of Henry Waltring, a manufacturer and business man of that 
city. 

Henry C. Peters. A resident of Lake County for the past ten years, 
Henry C. Peters came to Crown Point in 1906 and without making any 
particular stir in this vicinity began working for Avages. Among his 
natural endowments and the results of self training, energy and busi- 
ness ability have been conspicuous, and on these qualities as a founda- 
tion he has continued to prosper and is now an independent merchant, 
one of the principal dealers in Lake County in fuel supplies, tile, and 
similar commodities. 

Henry C. Peters was born in Chicago in 1876, a son of Rudolph and 
Sophia. Peters. His parents came from Germany and about the close 
of our Civil war settled in Chicago, later moved to Porter County, In- 
diana, and from there to Eagle Creek Township in Lake County. Ru- 
dolph Peters was chiefly known in this part of 'Indiana as a ditch con- 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 565 

tractor, engaged in the construction of some of the early drainage ditches, 
and subsequently as a farmer. 

Henry C. Peters acquired an education in the common schools, was 
actively engaged in farming for five years, and moving to Crown Point 
in 1906, entered the employ of Mr. Crowell, a building constructor. He 
was also connected with the plumbing trade, but in 1909 established a 
plant of his own under the name H. C. Peters, dealing in coal, wood, 
drain tile and fertilizers. 

On May 14, 1902, Mr. Peters married Dina Rosenthal, daughter of 
Adolph and Sophie Rosenthal, Lake County farmers well known in their 
community. Mr. Peters is an active member of the Chamber of Com- 
merce, having been one of the charter organizers of that local association. 
His church is the Presbyterian, and his lodge affiliations are with the 
Modern Woodmen of America, the Knights of Pythias and the Inde- 
pendent Order of Foresters. 

Benjamin Walter Chidlaw, M. D. Engaged in the practice of 
medicine at Hammond since 1905, Dr. Chidlaw is regarded as a physi- 
cian and surgeon of unusual ability and his practice and professional 
relations prove his high standing. 

Benjamin Walter Chidlaw was born at Cleves in Hamilton County, 
Ohio, October 21, 1879, a son of John and Harrist (Hayes) Chidlaw. 
His father was a substantial farmer and the son grew up in the vicinity 
of Cincinnati, and most of his early education was acquired in the 
Woodward High School of that city. He subsequently attended the 
University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, and in 1904 graduated M. D. 
from the Miami Medical College at Cincinnati. The following year 
was spent in getting experience for independent practice as an interne 
in the German Deaconess Hospital at Cincinnati. 

In June. 1905. Doctor Chidlaw located at Hammond and has since 
engaged in a general practice. At the present time he is serving as 
deputy coroner of Lake County, and is surgeon for the Indiana Harbor 
Belt, the Chicago, Indiana and Southern and the Chesapeake and Ohio 
Railway Companies. He is also medical examiner for three of the old- 
line insurance companies of Hammond. His professional relations are 
with the Lake County Medical Society and the Indiana State Medical 
and the Tenth District Medical Association. Doctor Chidlaw is also 
a member of the Hammond Country Club, has taken the Chapter degrees 
in Masonry, and is exalted ruler of the Hammond Lodge of Elks. In 
1905 at Lawrenceburg, Indiana, he married Nelle O 'Toole. Their only 
daughter, Dorothy, died at the age of four years. 

Albert Edward Escher. Coming to Hammond in 1890, Mr. Escher 
really has a place among the early citizens, and has been continuously 
identified with the business and community affairs of this locality. 
Energy and enthusiasm has been characteristic of Mr. Escher in all his 
dealings and relations with his fellowmen, and while he has acquired 
important interests he has at the same time gained and merited the 
complete trust and esteem of all men. 

Albert Edward Escher was born in Albion, Michigan, May 21, 1866, 
a son of Jacob and Mary Jane (Kennedy) Escher. His father was a 
fruit grower, nursery man and florist at Albion. With a public school 
education, Mr. Escher started out in life on his own account, and on 
locating at Hammond in 1890 secured the management for the distribu- 



566 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

tion and sale of all the Chicago papers in this city. That was a business 
which naturally grew with the rapid development of the town, and 
he continued as local circulation manager for fourteen years. Since 
his first election in 1903, Mr. Escher has been assessor for North 
Township, and his official record is one of which he may well be proud. 
In a business way Mr. Escher is identified with the Lake County Guar- 
antee Title and Trust Company, the Hammond Savings and Trust 
Bank, and he owns stock in the Booster Cigar Company. He has 
also invested in Hammond real estate, and has an interest in the T. E. 
Bell subdivision and other city property. 

In 1891 Mr. Escher married Erty M. Cotton, a daughter of George 
S. Cotton, a contractor of Hammond. The family worship in the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, and Mr. Escher is a member of the Cham- 
ber of Commerce, is a Knights Templar Mason and affiliates with the 
Mystic Shrine. 

Charles A. Smith. One of the most active citizens and public 
leaders of Hammond during the past thirteen or fourteen years has been 
Charles A. Smith, who came to the city in April, 1900, to take up his 
duties as rector of St. Paul's Episcopal Church. He continued in the 
active work of the ministry and in charge of that church until October, 
1913. When resigning from the ministry, Mr. Smith located at Ham- 
mond as one of its business men, and has since been district agent of 
the Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company. He has been iden- 
tified with many civic and philanthropic movements since his residence 
at Hammond, is an energetic and able leader in anything he undertakes, 
and has had a serviceable career. He served as president of the Ham- 
mond public library board for two years, and was a member of the 
board six years. He is a member of the Hammond Country Club and 
of the Hammond Chamber of Commerce, and is a Mason, affiliated with 
the Blue Lodge, Chapter and Commandery, and also the Mystic Shrine. 

Charles A. Smith was born at Stratford, Connecticut, in 1870, a 
son of Franklin C. and Jennie (Stewart) Smith. His father was promi- 
nent in Connecticut as editor of the Bridgeport Standard and later as 
secretary of the Bridgeport Hydraulic Company. 

Charles A. Smith after his education in the public schools, graduated 
from Yale University in the class of 1894. His studies in preparation 
for the ministry were pursued at Berkley Divinity School, and he was. 
ordained a deacon in 1897 and a priest in 1898. After one year at 
Poughkeepsie, New York, and a year and a half at St. Joseph, Mis- 
souri, he came to Hammond, where his career and services have already 
been sketched. > 

In 1900 Mr. Smith married Adelaide Tracy, of St. Joseph, Missouri. 
Their three children are Harlan DuFay, Stewart, and Paul Tracy. All 
the family attend the St. Paul's Episcopal Church. 

Harry E. Sharrer, M. D. As a surgeon Doctor Sharrer probably 
stands foremost in the Calumet region for his successful record and 
his many influential relations with the community. 

Dr. Harry E. Sharrer was born at Bo wen, Illinois, June 11, 1873. 
a son of Wilbur F. and Katherine (Moore) Sharrer. His father is a 
physician and surgeon, and the Sharrer family have a somewhat notable 
record in the profession, sixteen of its members being identified with 
this vocation. Dr. Harry E. Sharrer attended the public school of 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 567 

Delphi, Indiana, finished his course in pharmacy at the Purdue Uni- 
versity in March, 1891, and the following three years were spent in the 
drug business at Delphi. Entering the Ohio Medical College at Cin- 
cinnati, after graduating M. D. in April, 1896, he established his office 
in Hammond, and began a career which has continued practically with- 
out interruption for the past eighteen years. His ability from the first 
was pronounced in surgery, and for some years his practice has been 
largely confined to that department. 

Doctor Sharrer is on the surgical staff of St. Margaret's Hospital; 
is medical director of the Northern States Life Insurance Company; is 
surgeon for the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern, for the Chicago, 
Indiana and Southern, the Indiana Harbor Belt Railway, and the Ham- 
mond, Whiting & East Chicago Street Railway Company. He is also 
a member and on the executive board of the American Association of 
Railway Surgeons, and a member of the National Association of Pen- 
sion Examiners, besides his membership with the Hammond, Lake 
County, Tenth District and Indiana Medical 'Societies. 

Doctor Sharrer is president of the Hammond Country Club, is presi- 
dent of the Masonic Building Association, and in Masonry has been 
Past Master of the Blue Lodge and Past Commander of the Knights 
Templar, Past Potentate of Orak Temple of the Mystic Shrine, and is 
present representative to the Imperial Council of North America. His 
other fraternal affiliations are with the Knights of Pythias, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks. He is a member of the Hammond Chamber of Commerce, be- 
longs to the Hamilton Club of Chicago, the University Club of Ham- 
mond, is vice chairman of the entertainment committee of the Indiana 
Society of Chicago, is a director of the Hammond Savings and Trust 
Bank and director of the Hammond Building & Loan Association. 

Doctor Sharrer w r as married in April, 1898, at Burr Oak, Michi- 
gan, to Charlotte Weaver, who died November 25, 1901, leaving one 
daughter, Kathryn. On June 11, 1903, Catherine Tracy of St. Joseph, 
Missouri, became his wife. They are members of the Presbyterian 
Church. Doctor Sharrer is in every sense a man of progressive poli- 
cies, and this is illustrated by the fact that he was the first citizen of 
Lake County to own an automobile, and since his first machine, has 
owned a number of them and uses them constantly in his practice, and 
is an enthusiastic and experienced automobilist. 

Patrick Reilley. One of the veteran business men of Hammond, 
Patrick Reilley has been identified with affairs in that city for thirty 
years, and along with material success has also won community esteem. 

His career has been one of long and varied accomplishment and 
activity. Born in Verplanck's Point, New York, January 1, 1848, he is 
a son of James and Bridget (O'Donnell) Reilley, who were born in 
Ireland. The father was a brickmaker by trade, and on coming to 
America located in New York State and for some time was superin- 
tendent of the Second Avenue Car Stables in New York City, and his 
death in 1855 resulted from the kick of a horse. He and his wife, who 
were members of the Catholic Church, had six children, two sons and 
four daughters. The widow subsequently married John Allen, and had 
a son by that marriage, John Allen, Jr. 

Patrick Reilley received his early schooling in New York State, and 
it was the Civil war which first interrupted the calm course of youth 



568 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

and diverted his energies into unusual directions. On October 23. 
1863, at the age of fifteen, he enlisted at Philadelphia in the United 
States Marine Corps, and saw service for five years, three months and 
eight days as drummer. He then re-enlisted, and served altogether four 
years, being attached to several vessels of the navy, including the Guer- 
riere, on which he went to Europe, and also on the Don, the DeSoto and 
the Brooklyn. While with the navy he witnessed not only some of 
the actual hostilities of the closing of "the Civil war, but visited and saw 
many parts of the globe. On retiring from the naval service he con- 
tinued in the same line as an employe in the Brooklyn Navy Yards 
for some time. 

At Charlestown, Massachusetts, Mr. Reilley became identified with 
the manufacture of butterine. That was the activity which eventually 
brought him to Hammond. In the east he was in the employ of the 
Standard Butter Manufacturing Company and later with the firm of 
John Reardon & Son of Cambridgeport, Massachusetts. In 1884, hav- 
ing become expert in the manufacture of butterine, he came to Ham- 
mond to take the position of superintendent of the butterine department 
of the Hammond Packing Company. After twelve years in that busi- 
ness, he started in business for himself as a plumber and was also in 
the grocery trade with his sons James and Edward for three years. His 
chief business interests, however, at Hammond during the greater part 
of his career has been the Reilley Plumbing Company, much of the active 
management of which has been in the hands of his son. 

Patrick Reilley has been much in the public eye since coming to 
Hammond, and as a democrat represented the third ward in the council 
for eight years, was acting mayor during the last eighteen months of his 
term as councilman, and also held the office of mayor by formal elec- 
tion four years. His fraternal affiliations arc with the Knights of 
Columbus, the Catholic Order of Foresters, the Independent Order of 
Foresters of Indiana, the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Catholic Church, and for many years they have had their 
home at 283 South Hohman Street. Patrick Reilley married Miss 
Mary A. MeSweeney, a daughter of Edward and Mary (Murphy) 
McSweeney. To this long and happy marriage were born thirteen 
children, and the eight who grew up were named as follows: Mary 
Ann, James C. Edward, Catherine, Bessie, Nora, Julia and Joseph. 

George M. Eder. The Citizens German National Bank of Hammond, 
of which Mr. Eder has been president since 1909, is one of the strongest 
and best known financial institutions in the Calumet district. Its national 
charter was issued May 2, 1906, and the facts of its prosperity are best 
indicated by its capital and surplus of $150,000 and deposits of more 
than a million dollars. The officers are: George M. Eder, president; 
A. H. Tapper, vice president; AYilliam D. Weis, vice president; L. G. 
Eder, assistant treasurer ; and H. M. Johnson, cashier. Among the 
directors are C. E. Bauer, Peter Crumpaeker, J. J. Ruff and J. K. 
Stinson. 

George M. Eder has been identified with Lake County for forty years, 
and has had a long and successful career in various lines of business and 
in public affairs. He was born in Landau, Bavaria, Germany. Feb- 
ruary 23, 1855, a son of John B. and Theresa (Huber) Eder. His father 
was for twelve years a soldier in the Bavarian Army. In 1855, when 




/3*4 M 6>Je*S 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 569 

George was an infant, the family emigrated to America, and arrived 
in the City of Chicago on October 10. The family suffered from the fire 
of 1871, and in 1873 moved to Crown Point, Indiana, where the father 
died February 3, 1877, being survived by his wife, who died at the age 
of eighty-two. 

George M. Eder was one of three sons and a daughter, spent his boy- 
hood in Chicago, attended the public and parochial schools, and learned 
the cigar-making business, which he followed with his brother Joseph 
in the firm of Eder Brothers of Chicago until 1873. On moving to Crown 
Point he continued the manufacture of cigars until 1891. In the previ- 
ous year he had been elected to the office of county clerk, a position which 
he filled for two terms, or eight years. 

Mr. Eder has been a resident of Hammond since May, 1903, and for 
a number of years did a large business as a cigar manufacturer. He held 
stock in the Commercial Bank of Crown Point, of which he was vice 
president for a year. Mr. Eder was also president of the American Potato 
Machine Company at Hammond. In a public way, besides his service as 
county clerk, he has for years been more or less closely identified with 
politics and affairs. He was for six years town clerk and treasurer of 
Crown Point, and was twice elected to the office of township trustee, 
which he filled three years, until he resigned to take up his duties as 
county clerk. Fraternally he is a member of the Catholic Order of 
Foresters, the Independent Order of Foresters, and with his family wor- 
ships in St. Joseph 's Catholic Church. He is also a member of the Ham- 
mond Country Club. 

On September 24, 1878, at Crown Point, Mr. Eder married Miss 
Frances M. Scherer, a daughter of Peter and Catherine (Young) Scherer. 
Her father was for several years a blacksmith at Crown .Point. To their 
marriage have been born seven children, most of whom have already taken 
independent positions in the world of affairs. They are : George J., 
Edward J., Clarence M., Louis G., Daniel E., Rose M., and Florence K. 
Edward J. lives in Crown Point and is a lawyer, while the others have 
their home in Hammond. 

"William Jacob Whinery. It is through his work as a successful 
lawyer that Mr. Whinery has proved his best usefulness in the com- 
munity of Hammond and the Calumet region, and any one at all 
familiar with the Lake County bar during the last ten or fifteen years 
will concede him an important place in its membership. 

William Jacob Whinery was born in Warren, Indiana, and, like so 
many men who have honored the professions, his birthplace was a farm. 
His parents were Isaac P. and Elizabeth J. (Rudduck) Whinery. As 
a boy and young man he learned to work for the prizes of life, and prac- 
tically earned his way all through college and the preparatory period 
before getting established in the law. He attended the public schools 
and the United Brethren College at Hartsville, Indiana, also the Indiana 
Central Normal College, and was later a student in the Indiana State 
University, altogether spending five years in the different institutions 
of higher learning. Mr. Whinery was admitted to the bar in 1897, and 
at once opened an office for general practice at Hammond. While his 
work as a lawyer has been largely along general lines, he is also attorney 
for a number of corporations in Hammond, and his skillful work in this 
connection has entitled him to the confidence of every business firm 
that has retained his services. 

Vol II— 7 



570 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

Mr. Whinery is a member and a former vice president of the Ham- 
mond Chamber of Commerce, belongs to the Hammond Country Club, 
and is affiliated with the Masonic order and the Knights of Pythias. 
By his marriage to Pearl I. Hinckley, a daughter of Thomas C. and 
Lydia Hinckley, of Oxford, Indiana, he has one child, Mildred Adele. 

T. Edwin Bell, D. D. S. The career of Doctor Bell has been iden- 
tified with Lake County for more than twenty-five years, and his work, 
whether in professional lines or in public affairs, has been sufficient to 
make his name one of the most familiar in the Calumet region. Practi- 
cally through all his residence in Lake County he has been prominently 
identified with republican politics, and a large number of citizens know 
him best as former Senator Bell. 

Dr. T. Edwin Bell was born at Kingston, Ontario, Canada, September 
23, 1864, a son of John and Helen (McKechnie) Bell. Grandfather 
John Bell was a native of England, immigrated to Canada, and spent 
the rest of his life as a farmer near Kingston, his death occurring when 
about eighty years of age, and his wife Ellen also reached advanced 
years. The maternal grandfather, William McKechnie, was a soldier 
in the English army during the war of 1812, and was a native of Scot- 
land, where he married and later immigrated to America. For many 
years he was a general merchant, and died at Kingston at the age of 
ninety-two, and his wife at the age of sixty-five. John Bell, the father 
of Doctor Bell, was likewise a Canadian farmer, and in his earlier years 
served with the rank of lieutenant in the English army. His wife died 
in February, 1901, and they were the parents of ten children, seven of 
whom grew to maturity. 

T. Edwin Bell had a public school education as a boy, and prepared 
for the profession of dentistry in the Dental College of Philadelphia, 
graduating D. D. S. in 1888. Tn the same year he came to Hammond, 
reaching this city on March 7, and was one of the early dentists to 
locate in what was then a comparatively small town. His later activi- 
ties have brought him more into prominence in public affairs and busi- 
ness than along the lines of his profession. From 1893 to 1895 he served 
as coroner of Lake County. Doctor Bell was chairman of the Repub- 
lican County Central Committee in 1896, and in 1902 was elected to 
the state senate for the term of four years. In 1890 he was appointed 
deputy oil inspector, and filled that office a number of years. His busi- 
ness connections are of a varied and important nature, and he is a 
director of the Northern Trust & Savings Bank, is president of the 
Miller Land Company at Miller, and is treasurer of the Lake County 
Oil Company operating in the oil fields of Oklahoma. 

Doctor Bell is a life member and was the first exalted ruler of the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks at Hammond, and is a mem- 
ber of the building committee which is preparing for the erection of a 
handsome club house, to be constructed during 1915. Other fraternal 
and social connections include the Masonic Order, the Knight Templar. 
Commandery and the Mystic Shrine, the Knights of Pythias, the Illi- 
nois Athletic Club of Chicago, the Hammond Country Club, and mem- 
bership in the Hammond Chamber of Commerce. Doctor Bell owns 
a summer home at Winnebago Lake. On June 2, 1891, Doctor Bell was 
married in Hammond to Lena Hohman, a member of the prominent 
Hohman familv of that city. 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 571 

Alva A. Young, M. D. A physician and surgeon whose work and 
abilities have commended him to the confidence of the people of Ham- 
mond and vicinity, and who in seven years has securely established 
his reputation and already enjoys a large practice, is Dr. Alva A. Young, 
who is well known both in the line of his profession and in social and 
fraternal affairs. 

Dr. Alva A. Young was born in Hamilton County, Indiana, Decem- 
ber 18, 1881, a son of Richard N. and Emma J. Manford. His father 
in early life was a teacher, and subsequently was a contractor in the 
building of pipe lines and highways. Doctor 'Young attended the coun- 
try schools for some years, and subsequently the high school at Indian- 
apolis, and in 1905 was graduated M. D. from the Central College of 
Physicians and Surgeons at Indianapolis. His first experience in 
individual practice was in Indianapolis, where he remained until May, 

1907, since which date Hammond has been his home. In January, 

1908, Doctor Young was appointed township, physician for North Town 
ship, and still looks after the public duties of that position. In 1912 
he was nominated for the office of county coroner, and lacked only 131 
votes of election. Doctor Young is examiner for the United States 
Marine Corps. 

In July, 1906, occurred his marriage to Lillian N. Fallowes, who was 
born in England, but lived in Chicago previous to her marriage. The 
doctor has a number of fraternal relations, has taken the Lodge, Council 
and Chapter degrees of Masonry, belongs to the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, the L. 0. O. M., the Fraternal Order of Eagles, the 
North American Union, the Tribe of Ben Hur and the Court of 
Honor. 

Herman Holtz. Identified with the citizenship of Hammond for 
a quarter of a century, Herman Holtz best known for his large floral 
establishment, a business which he founded fifteen years ago and which 
is one of the largest of its kind in the Calumet region. Mr. Holtz learned 
his profession in Germany and has made a success in life by concentra- 
tion of effort, by thorough knowledge of his business, and by steadily 
furnishing a service which has come to be appreciated by hundreds 
of regular patrons. 

Born in Germany in 1856, Herman Holtz was reared and educated 
in his native land and learned his profession there. Coming to America 
in 1883, in 1889 he established his home at Hammond, and was for 
several years connected with the Hammond Packing Company, and also 
served, as florist for the late M. M. Towle. In 1898 he took up business 
for himself, and has developed extensive greenhouses and large general 
trade at his plant at 57 Sheffield Avenue. His place is known as the 
Hammond Greenhouses, and he has ten thousand square feet under 
glass. 

Mr. Holtz was married to Matilda Lindke, of Germany. Their 
four children are : Hattie, wife of Emil Gluth, of Hammond ; Selma, 
now Mrs. Thomas Jenkins ; Rudolph, associated with his father in busi- 
ness, and who married Anna Scharloch of Hammond; Anna, who lives 
at home. The family are members of the German Evangelical Church, 
while Mr. Holtz has taken the Knight Templar Commandery degrees 
of the Masonic Order and is also affiliated with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows and the Rebekahs. He is interested in social and civic 
activities and is a member of the Hammond Saengerbund. 



572 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

Erie G. Sproat. While one of the junior members of the Lake 
County Bar, Erie G. Sproat at the end of five years in practice at 
Hammond is regarded as an attorney with exceptional cpialifications and 
a record of substantial success in the varied business which he has hand- 
led since he took his first fee. 

Mr. Sproat was born in Covington, Ohio, February 5, 1883, a son 
of William F. and Mary A. (Mack) Sproat. His father is a contractor 
and builder and his home is now in Dayton, Ohio. Erie G. Sproat after 
attending the public schools was a student in the Miami University at 
Oxford, Ohio, and before gaining admission to the bar did considerable 
practical work in educational fields, having taught from 1902 to 1906. 
That work furnished him the means to finish his law studies, and he 
graduated LL. B. from Valparaiso University Law Department in 
June, 1908. Since then he has been engaged in a general practice in 
Hammond. Mr. Sproat is secretary of the Lake County Bar Associa- 
tion and has been for the past two years, and has membership in the 
Indiana State and the American Bar Association. Fraternally his con- 
nections are with the Masonic order, the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Fraternal 
Order of Eagles, of which he is past worthy president, and the Tribe of 
Ben Hur. On November 12. 1913, Mr." Sprout married Lillian R. 
Varges, of Chicago. 

Joseph Tristan Hutton. In Hammond and almost the entire Calu- 
met region the standing of Joseph T. Hutton as an architect is clear and 
distinctive, and it is only necessary to point to examples of his profes- 
sional skill, which can be seen in almost every part of the larger cities, 
to indicate what he has done and what his abilities represent. Mr. Hutton 
is one of the oldest architects in Northern Indiana and one of the leaders 
of his profession in the entire state. 

From an early youth spent in Canada his experience and inclinations 
have all been in the direction of technical and building work. As a boy 
in Canada he had the superintendence of government lighthouse work 
for a time. Joseph T. Hutton was born in Dunville, Canada, June 20, 
1861, a son of Richard and Margaret (Tristan) Hutton. His father was 
in the government service, and the son was given an unusually liberal 
education, finishing in St. Catherine's College, at St. Catherine's, Canada, 
graduating in 1883. He had specialized in poly technical courses, and 
after a prelim inary experience in his native country went to Chicago in 
1884, was employed by several different firms of architects. Later he was 
at work in his profession in Rochester, Michigan City, and South Bend, 
all in Indiana, and in 1897 opened his office in Hammond. 

Practically all the large public schools of Hammond and many in 
other parts of the Calumet district have had the services of Mr. Hutton 
as architect. The Lafayette school, the United States postoffice, the 
public library, the Superior courthouse, the Irving, the Wallace, the 
Robertsville schools and the Methodist Episcopal church are all examples 
of his work in Hammond. He also was architect for most of the schools 
in East Chicago and Indiana Harbor, including the McKinley, the 
Washington, the James Whitcomb Riley and the James A. Garfield 
schools. At Gary he drew the plans for the Gary building and many 
residences and business blocks. One of the finest courthouses in the 
state is that at Lebanon, Indiana, and Mr. Hutton 's name appears on 
the corner-stone as architect. He was also architect for the courthouse 





^/^^feezr 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 57;] 

at Kentland, in this state, the high school at Michigan City, and one 
of the large school buildings of South Bend. 

Mr. Hutton is vice president of the Hammond Pure Ice Company. He 
has been a director since its organization of the Masonic Building Asso- 
ciation, is a member of the Commercial Club, the Hammond Country 
Club, and has many prominent relations both fraternally and profession- 
ally. He has been honored with the thirty-third and highest degree in 
Scottish Rite Masonry and is a life member of the Consistory Club of 
Masons at South Bend. He is a member of the Indiana Chapter of the 
Association of American Architects, and belongs to the Architects' Club 
of South Bend. 

At Rochester, Indiana, January 7, 1888, Mr. Hutton married Bertha 
Sturgeon, daughter of Enoch and Anna M. Sturgeon, her father an 
attorney at law. Their three children are : Frances, the wife of Alex- 
ander A. Stoikowitz, a mechanical engineer at Montreal, Canada; William 
Sturgeon, who is an architect associated with his father; and Joseph 
Wallace, who is a machinist and lives at Hammond. The family worship 
in the Methodist Episcopal church. 

John L. Rohde. The career of John L. Rohde for a number of 
years has been a vital part of the life and progress of his home city 
of Hammond. Mr. Rohde 's has been a typical American success, hav- 
ing its beginning as a poor boy and continuing with steady but hard 
won advancement until he has found a place among the foremost busi- 
ness men of the Calumet district. Successful in business, he has with 
exceptional public spirit given the influence of his character and his 
means for the upbuilding of his home town, and this community has 
been in many ways advanced to prosperity through the presence in its 
citizenship of John L. Rohde. 

A native of Chicago, John L. Rohde was born Januauy 27, 1864, 
a son of Fred J. and Elizabeth (Grabupp) Rohde. Both parents were 
natives of Germany, left that country in 1863, and settled in Chicago, 
and in 1876 the family moved to Jasper County, Indiana, and settled 
on a farm. John L. Rohde acquired his education partly in the public 
schools of Chicago and with some attendance after moving to Jasper 
County. His early experience were those of a farm boy and in 1891 he 
moved to Chicago, but in 1893 returned to Hammond and engaged 
in the flour and feed business, which under his capable direction has 
grown to be a flourishing enterprise. It is now conducted under the 
name of John L. Rohde & Sons, his sons Edward H. and Fred A. being 
his partners. Mr. Rohde is also vice president of the Hammond Build- 
ing and Loan Association, and a director of the Home Building & Loan 
Association. 

His entrance to public affairs began with his election to the city 
council in 1898, with service of four years. In 1906 the mayor appointed 
him chairman of the board of public works, and he was again appointed 
to that important local office in 1911. He is now serving as president 
of the board. Mr. Rohde has been very active in the city's affairs. 
and during the last ten or fifteen years scarcely any improvement or 
forward movement have been undertaken without his aid and capable 
influence. He is a member and director of the Chamber of Commerce 
and belongs to the Country Club. 

In 1886 Mr. Rohde married Emma Hasselbring, who was born on a 
farm in Lake County, a daughter of Frederick and Dorothy Hassel- 



574 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

bring. To this union have been born four children : Edward H., Fred- 
erick, Laura A. and Elizabeth Dorothy. The family worship in the 
German Lutheran Church of Hammond. On February 28, 1914, Mrs. 
Rohde died, and was buried in Concordia cemetery at Hammond. 

Cyrus Hayden. Crown Point counts among its best known and 
representative business men Cyrus Hayden, who is a native of Lake 
County and belongs to one of the older families, and after a number of 
years spent in farming came to Crown Point in 1908 and has since 
conducted a livery stable and automobile headquarters. 

Cyrus Hayden was born in West Creek Township of Lake County 
June 2, 1864, a son of Lewis and Almeda (Kneisley) Hayden. His 
father was a farmer, and the son grew up on a farm, and after his train- 
ing in the schools took up agriculture as his regular vocation. In 
1891 he moved out to Iowa, was one of the substantial agriculturists 
of Adair County, and in 1908 returned from Iowa and opened a livery 
and sales stable and automobile livery at Crown Point. 

For two terms during his residence in Iowa Mr. Hayden served as 
township assessor, and in 1913 was a member of the Crown Point city 
council. Fraternally his affiliations are with the Knights of Pythias 
and the "Woodmen of the World, and his church is the Presbyterian. 

In 1886 Mr. Hayden married Eliza Ferris, of Yellow Head Town- 
ship in Kankakee County, Illinois. To their marriage have been born 
three children : Benjamin, who is now in charge of a mail route out 
of Crown Point, married Edith McKay of Lake County, and has two 
children Margaret and Robert. Ina, the second child, is now Mrs. 
Burdet Lee, farming people of West Creek Township, and they have 
one child, Irma. George, the youngest, is associated with his father 
in the livery and automobile business. 

John C. Endress. The Endress family were established *in Lake 
County fully fifty years ago, and Mr. John C. Endress is a representa- 
tive of the third generation in this county, and though a young man 
still under thirty years of age has already placed himself in a business 
way, and is one of the leading merchants of Crown Point. 

"John C. Endress was born in Lake County, October 31, 1886, a son 
of Henry J. and Mary E. (Cress) Endress. Grandfather Endress came 
to Lake Count}^ in 1854, and was one of the men who helped to clear 
up the county and develop its farm lands. The father was born in 
this county and his career has been that of a substantial farmer. John 
C. Endress attended the high school at Crown Point, and served his 
apprenticeship in a drug store in that city. After the usual examination 
he was made a registered pharmacist in 1909, and after several years 
of experience in the employment of others engaged in the drug busi- 
ness for himself in 1913, and now has a first-class establishment, con- 
ducted along progressive lines. 

On June 8, 1909. Mr. Endress married Addie Westbay of Lake 
County, a daughter of James W. and Bertha Westbay. Her father 
is a farmer of Porter County, and formerly was engaged in educational 
work. To their marriage have been born two children: John W. and 
Margaret Blanche. Mr. Endress co-operates with his fellow business men 
in everything that will advance the welfare of Crown Point, and is a 
charter member of its Chamber of Commerce. 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 575 

Edward Simon. The popular and efficient county auditor of Lake 
County hardly needs an introduction to the people of this section. The 
fact that his fellow citizens have honored him with one of the most im- 
portant county offices is sufficient indication of his standing both as a 
business man and citizen. Mr. Simon has been a successful business man 
in Lake County, has developed a prosperous factory for the making of 
a popular brand of cigars, has for a number of years been prominent 
in the democratic party, and since taking his present office has made a 
record that vindicates the confidence placed in him by the people of the 
county. 

Edward Simon is a native of Buffalo, New York, born March 16, 
1873, and his father, Christian Simon was a tanner by trade. Edu- 
cated in the public schools and in St. Joseph's College at Buffalo, he 
early learned the trade of cigar maker, and on coming to Lake County 
in 1890 established a small shop at Liverpool. He made goods of excel- 
lent quality, and as the sale rapidly increased and was distributed over 
a widening territory, he moved his business first to Hobart and in 
1907 to Hammond, in order to have a more central location and larger 
facilities. He now employs forty people in the business. The leading 
brand manufactured by him is known as "La Vendor," and the factory 
is the La Vendor Cigar Factory the business having been incorporated 
in January, 1914, as the La Vendor Cigar Company, with a capital of 
$15,000. Mr. Simon is president of the company. 

Mr. Simon was elected county chairman of the Democratic Central 
Committee of Lake County in 1904, in 1906 and 1908. In 1906 his first 
important public office came in his election to the legislature, in which 
he served one term. In 1912 the people of Lake County chose him for 
the office of county auditor for a term of four years. Fraternally his 
affiliations are with the Independent Order of Foresters, the Knights 
of Columbus, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the 
Fraternal Order of Eagles and the L. O. O. M. He is a member of 
the Hammond Chamber of Commerce and of the similar organization at 
Crown Point, and of the Hammond Country Club. In 1894 Mr. Simon 
married Jessie Flaherty, of Liverpool, Indiana. She is a daughter 
of Ellen and Daniel Flaherty, her father being a railroad man. 

Herbert Leslie "Wheaton. The man who helps himself is always 
an object of admiration, and his success should be estimated in accord- 
ance with the difficulties which have to be overcome. Of self-made men 
in the best sense of the term now living in Lake County, Herbert Leslie 
Wheaton is an interesting example. When he was in the fifth grade 
of public schools, it became necessary for him to leave his books in 
order to contribute his youthful strength and labors to the support of 
the family. When four years later it was possible for him to enter 
school again, he supported himself by doing janitor work, and in that 
way and by recourse to other means not only secured a fairly liberal 
education, but prepared himself for a career as a teacher. 

Herbert Leslie Wheaton was born at Greenwood, Illinois. February 
16, 1877. but his home has been in Lake County since 1879. His 
parents were V. B. and Johanna Wheaton. and the mother died when 
the son was eight years of age and the family was never in affluent cir- 
cumstances. Mr. Wheaton was educated in Crown Point, learned the 
trade of lather, and that was his source of livelihood during vacation 
periods for a number of years. For ten years Mr. Wheaton taught 



576 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

school in Lake County, and was one of the most successful in his call- 
ing in the local schools. He finally resigned his school work in March, 
1908, to accept the position of deputy county clerk, and has been one 
of the popular officials at the courthouse ever since. 

Mr. Wheaton is a member of the Chamber of Commerce, and is 
prominent in fraternal circles. He is a member of Lake Lodge No. 157, 
F. & A. M., of which he was secretary for five years, belongs to Lincoln 
Chapter No. 53, R. A. M. ; is past grand in Lodge No. 195, I. 0. O. F. ; 
belongs to Lodge No. 314 of the Knights of Pythias, to Gary Lodge No. 
1152 of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and also affiliates 
with the Moose at East Chicago. 

Mr. Wheaton was married July 29, 1906, to Jessie J. Ross, daughter 
of David and Phoebe Ross of Crown Point. They are the parents of 
one son, Roland L.. born May 15, 1908. 

John A. Gavit. One of the best known and most successful lawyers 
of Hammond is John A. Gavit, former city attorney and one of the 
leaders in Lake County democracy. Mr. Gavit entered his profession 
twenty-five years ago, practiced in Michigan until 1896, and during 
his career at Hammond has represented important public and corporate 
interests as a lawyer, and has won a reputation for his fidelity to his 
ideals and to the trusts which the people and his clients have reposed in 
him. He is a man well known for his integrity and honesty, and these 
two characteristics have done much toward gaining for him the large 
private practice which he enjoys. 

John A. Gavit was born in Walsinghain, Canada, August 19, 1861, a 
son of Albert N. and Bridget (Highland) Gavit. His father was a 
native of Connecticut and the son of a Connecticut farmer, while the 
mother was born in Ireland. From Canada, the family moved to Michi- 
gan and lived on a farm near Saginaw, where John A. Gavit, who was 
one of seven children, was reared. His education was acquired in the 
public schools at Pontiac, and in 1886 he graduated from the Normal 
College at Flint. After reading law in private offices, he was admitted 
to the Michigan bar in 1888, and was engaged in a successful practice 
at Saginaw until 1896. During his residence in Michigan Mr. Gavit 
took an active part in democratic politics, served as justice of the peace 
in Saginaw for three years, was elected prosecuting attorney and held 
that office two years. In 1908 he was appointed city attorney of Ham- 
mond, and again in 1909 by Judge Lawrence Becker, then mayor of the 
city. During the last two campaigns Mr. Gavit has been chairman of 
the Lake County Democratic Central Committee. Much of his practice 
is devoted to his duties as attorney in Lake and Porter counties for the 
New York Central Lines. 

Mr. Gavit is a member of the Hammond Country Club and the Cham- 
ber of Commerce, is a past exalted ruler of the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, and has also affiliated with the Knights of Pythias and 
the Maccabees. In January, 1890, he married Miss Emma Campbell. 
Her parents are John and Adelia (Johnson) Campbell. Mr. Gavit and 
wife have the following children : Elwin J., Russell, Bernard, Donald, 
Hubert, and Inez. 

August II. W. Johnson. While the people of Lake County generally 
know Mr. Johnson as the efficient and popular county recorder, the 
business with which he has been chiefly identified is that of building 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 577 

contractor, and for a number of years he has kept up an organization 
whose services have been employed in many of the most important 
building contracts in East Chicago and vicinity. Mr. Johnson has 
applied intelligent effort to the building business, has afforded a thor- 
oughly responsible management and hundreds of investors and builders 
have sought his services in his particular line. 

August H. W. Johnson was born at Hinsdale, Illinois, January 9, 
1869, a son of Gustav A. and Wilhelmina H. Johnson. His father was 
a building contractor. The son had to take up the serious responsibili- 
ties of life with a very meager equipment in the way of book learning, 
but has made his way over all handicaps by sheer force of ability, and 
not long after getting started as a carpenter he took up contracting on 
his own responsibility. For four years he was employed as general 
foreman in the Grasselli Chemical Company at East Chicago, being 
foreman of all the outside plants of the company throughout the country. 
Most of his work as a building contractor has been performed in East 
Chicago. Examples of his construction there are the public library, the 
city hall, the engine house, the McKinley school, the Wallace school, the 
Steglitz Park school, United States Metal Refining Building, the Calu- 
met Car Company's Building, the George B. Limbert Company's Build- 
ing, the William Graves Tank Works, the Freedman Building, and large 
numbers of stores, flats and residences. Outside of East Chicago he 
erected the schoolhouse at Saxony, Indiana, and has remodeled several 
school buildings in North Township. 

Mr. Johnson's election to the office of county recorder came in 
1932. He also has a military record, having enlisted early in the Span- 
ish-American war in Company A of the One Hundred and Fifty-first 
Indiana Infantry, went out with his regiment in the rank of lieutenant 
and saw one year of service in Cuba and was with the troops that 
occupied the City of Havana. Mr. Johnson was one of the organizers 
and charter members of the Spanish-American War Veterans, and was 
elected senior commander of the organization. Fraternally he has 
taken the Scottish Rite degrees, and is a Shriner, is past exalted ruler 
of Lodge No. 981 B. P. 0. E. at East Chicago, and is past chancellor 
and member of the Grand Lodge of the Knights of Pythias. He and his 
family are members of the Congregational Church at East Chicago. 

Mr. Johnson was married in 1904 to Flora B. Bronson of Valparaiso, 
daughter of Pernot and Elizabeth Bronson. They are the- parents of 
one child, Marjorie Elizabeth. 

Ernest L. Shortridge. Now giving all his time to his duties as 
clerk of the Lake County superior court, with residence at Crown Point, 
Mr. Shortridge was for many years a law stenographer and court 
reporter and has been identified with Lake County practically all his 
life. His record as an official has been characterized by the fairness 
of performance and obliging courtesy to all who use his office which has 
made him one of the most popular of the county officials. 

Lowell in Lake County is the birthplace of Ernest L. Shortridge, 
and he was born June 11, 1873, a son of Irenius and Marietta (Purdy) 
Shortridge. His father was a farmer, and his youth was spent on a 
farm, with an education in the public schools supplemented by a course 
in the Valparaiso University, from which he graduated in 1892. Hav- 
ing studied stenography, he took up law stenography as a profession, 
and after four years was appointed court reporter in both Lake and 



578 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

Porter counties, and had eleven years of experience in those exacting 
duties. His first election to his present office as clerk of the superior 
court of Lake County came in 1906. In 1910 he was again elected, and 
still holds the office. Mr. Shortridge is also secretary of the Lake 
County Investment Company at East Chicago and secretary of the 
Lake County Security Company of Crown Point. 

He is a member of the Chamber of Commerce, the Hammond Coun- 
try Club, is a Knights Templar Mason and Shriner. affiliates with the 
Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
and the church of himself and family is the Presbyterian. In 1898 
Mr. Shortridge married Misha Matins of Hammond." Their one child 
is Ruth Esther. 

Claude W. Allman. One of the oldest firms of abstractors in Lake 
County is that of Allman, and several members of the family have 
been identified with that business upwards of forty years. Mr. Claude 
W. Allman was trained along that line practically from boyhood, and 
it has been his regular work for the past twenty-six years. 

Claude W. Allman was born at Niles, Michigan, October 24, 1869, 
son of Amos and Mary A. (Luther) Allman. His father moved to 
Crown Point in 1870, and engaged in the abstract business, which sub- 
sequently was taken up by his son. Claude W. Allman grew up in 
Crown Point, was educated in the high school, and since 1888 has been 
with his father and brother in the abstract business. 

Mr. Allman in 1913 was elected for a four year term as member of 
the city council of Crown Point, and has always been active in county 
affairs. He is an ex-member of the board of education. Among other 
business interests Mr. Allman is president of the Crown Point Building 
& Loan Savings Association. He is prominent in both the Masonic 
and Knights of Pythias fraternities, is a past master and past high 
priest, and belongs to the Mystic Shrine. He is a past chancellor com- 
mander of the Knights of Pythias. 

At Crown Point on June 29, 1892, Mr. Allman married Anna Fisher. 
To their marriage were born five children. One son, Luther John, died 
at the age of three years, while the four living are: Major F., John 
Claude, Ruth Genevieve, and Luther Milton. 

J. Frank Meeker. Among the capable men who have made up the 
roster of the Lake County bar, there was perhaps none with greater 
ability in the law and with more serviceable citizenship in the com- 
munity than the late J. Frank Meeker, whose death on May 16. 1914. 
bereaved the county of one of its best known men. The late Mr. Meeker 
had practiced law for more than twenty years, and had gained success 
through hard work, a rugged native ability and thorough honesty and 
integrity. 

J. Frank Meeker had a distinction which is now very rare having 
been born in a log cabin home. His birthplace was in Center Town- 
ship, five miles from Crown Point, and his birthday was December 11, 
1868. His parents were Sherman B. and Elizabeth (Cress) Meeker, 
natives of Pennsylvania, who moved west to Illinois, later to Michigan, 
and in 1866 came to Lake County and built as their first habitation the 
log cabin in which their son was born. There were four children in the 
family: Nathan Brewster, Charles H., Henrietta and J. Frank. 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 579 

The youngest of the children, Mr. Meeker grew up on a farm, had 
the wholesome environment of the country to influence his early training 
and formation of character, got his first knowledge of books from 
country schools, and from the age of thirteen continued his schooling 
at the Crown Point High School before graduating. He read law 
in a local lawyer's office for two years, entered the University of 
Michigan, and graduated in the law department with the class of 1892, 
and in the same year took up active practice at Crown Point. One year 
was spent in Hammond, but Crown Point was the scene of his activities 
as a lawyer and the community to which he devoted his best work as a 
citizen. For a time he was a partner in practice with Judge McMahan 
of the circuit bench. While his reputation and success came largely 
from his close application to the strict lines of his profession, Mr. 
Meeker was also in public affairs as deputy prosecuting attorney for 
four years, and also as county attorney for several years. He was also 
an active republican and had an official part in the affairs of that party. 
Fraternally he was identified with the Masons, the Knights of Pythias, 
the Independent Order of Foresters and the North American Union. 

Mrs. Meeker, who survives her husband, has the distinction of having 
been the first woman admitted to the bar of Lake County. Before 
her marriage she was Miss Stella S. Colby, and was born and reared 
in Lake County. She married Mr. Meeker on March 26, 1894. To their 
marriage was born a daughter, Stella. 

Spencer Lane Beach. A long and honorable relationship with the 
public has been sustained by Mr. Beach at Crown Point through his 
office as agent for the Pennsylvania Railway Company. His service in 
this capacity has extended over thirty-eight years, and whether as a 
carpenter, a railroad man, or county official his work has always been 
characterized by efficiency and fidelity which marks him as one of the 
most dependable citizens. 

Spencer Lane Beach was born in Knox County, Ohio, June 18, 1849, 
a son of William and Emily Beach, grew up on an Ohio farm, and 
the education which has served him adequately for all the requirements 
of his career came from the public schools and a business college. As a 
youth he learned the trade of cabinet maker and later that of carpenter, 
and that was his line of work until 1876. In the meantime, in 1870, 
he had located in Lake County, but the demand for workmen in his line 
after the Chicago fire of 1871 kept him busy in that city until 1873, 
after which he continued his trade in Lake County until 1876. On May 
24, 1876, Mr. Beach began his work for the Pennsylvania Railroad 
Company as agent at LeRoy. His service continued there until January 
1, 1893. In the meantime he had served in the office of county commis- 
sioner during 1890-91-92, and in October, 1892, was appointed and on 
the first of the following year took charge of the Pennsylvania station 
at Crown Point as agent. Since then his home has been in the county 
seat. 

Mr. Beach is prominent in fraternal affairs, is a past noble grand 
and member of the Grand Lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, is past chancellor and also president of the Endowment Rank 
in the Knights of Pythias. He is a trustee and a member of the official 
board of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Crown Point. On Decem- 
ber 22. 1899, was celebrated his marriage to Nannie Hart, of Frederick- 
town, Ohio. Her father was Christian Cosner, a farmer. Mr. Beach 
and Avife have one daughter, Flov Ellen, who now lives at home. 



580 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

Henry G. Merz, M. D. For fully twenty years Doctor Merz has 
practiced medicine and surgery in Northern Indiana, the greater part 
of the time in Port Wayne, though it was in Hammond that he began 
his career as a doctor and for the past five years has again been identified 
with that city. While he has done much in the quiet way of a private 
practitioner to impress his ability and services on these two communities, 
he has been particularly prominent in the medical profession as a whole, 
and at Fort Wayne was a leader in the organized activities of medicine. 
As a surgeon he probably has no superior in Lake County. 

Dr. Henry G. Merz, though most of his career has been spent in the 
North, was born at Castroville, Texas, December 5, 1869. His parents 
were Henry and Anna (Germann) Merz, his father a Lutheran minister 
and a pioneer of his church in Southwestern Texas, but now superin- 
tendent of the Lutheran Orphanage at Addison, Illinois. Doctor Merz 
attended the Lutheran parochial schools in Texas, finished a business 
course in Austin of that state, and in 1884, when fifteen years of age, 
went to Chicago and found employment as clerk in a drug store. It was 
his work as a pharmacy clerk that eventually afforded him the means to 
take up the practice of medicine. He studied medicine while at work in 
the store, and at the age of seventeen entered the Homeopathic Medical 
College of Chicago, where he graduated M. D. in 1892. For two years 
following his graduation, he was house physician and surgeon in the 
Emergency Hospital of Chicago. Towards the close of 1893 Doctor Merz 
located at Hammond, but after two and a half years went to Fort Wayne, 
and that city was the field of his professional efforts for fourteen years. 
During his first residence at Hamomnd he served two years as secretary 
of the Board of Health. In successive years his general practice has 
become more and more concentrated into the department of surgery, and 
at the present time a large amount of his own work lies in that field and 
many cases are transferred by other physicians to him for surgical treat- 
ment. 

During his residence at Fort Wayne Doctor Merz was secretary of 
the Homeopathic Society one year and president a year. He was one 
of the organizers of the Fort Wayne Lutheran Hospital, and when that 
institution was finished he was made president of its medical staff and 
served five years. The staff from time to time was increased to about 
twenty members, and Doctor Merz' activities were largely influential 
in the success of the hospital. He was also house physician for the 
Reformed Orphanage Hospital four years, and house physician three 
years at the Lutheran College at Fort Wayne. In 1909 Doctor Merz 
returned to Hammond, and his practice has since been confined to this 
city and vicinity. He is a member of the Lake County Medical Society 
and the Indiana State Medical Association, the American Medical Asso- 
ciation and the American Institute of Homeopathy. 

Outside of his profession he is a member of the Chamber of Commerce, 
the Hammond Country Club and the Lutheran Church. Doctor Merz 
married Caroline Birkner of Chicago, daughter of Charles and Hen- 
rietta Birkner. Her father was an architect. 

William New-ton. The high business and personal standing of 
William Newton rests upon many years of activity, but principally is 
it the outgrowth of the progressive farming operations with which he 
has been connected in section 9, Center Township, during the past ten 
years. He is further known as a natural mechanic, a skilled machinist, 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 581 

a public-spirited promoter of stable and practical conditions, and as a 
typical representative of the best class of Englishmen who wander from 
their native land to this country. 

Mr. Newton was born near the City of Manchester, England, Decem- 
ber 24, 1857, and is a son of Edwin and Margaret Newton, the former 
born near Manchester, England, and the latter in Wales. The father, 
a machinist by trade, followed that occupation throughout his life at 
Manchester, in which city both he and the mother died. Five sons and t 
two daughters were born to them and of these, children six are living. ' 
William Newton attended the schools of his home locality until reaching 
the age of thirteen years, and at that time began learning the trade of 
machinist under his father's instruction, so that his further studies 
had to be prosecuted in night school. He remained with his father for a 
period of ten years, but when twenty-three years old, in 1880, crossed 
the Atlantic to Canada, and for five months was employed in tho Kings- 
ton Locomotive Works, at Kingston, Ontario. Following this he came 
to Marquette, Michigan, and for one and one-half years was foreman 
of the Detroit, Mackinaw & Marquette Railroad shops, and for a short 
time was employed on the Iron Range, in Marquette County. Succeed- 
ing this Mr. Newton went to the copper country and began work for the 
Calumet & Hecla Mining Company, July 12, 1883, as a machinist 
working on locomotives, but in June, 1888, was promoted to the posi- 
tion of foreman on an underground pump. He continued in that capac- 
ity continuously until February, 1905, with the exception of twenty 
months spent as a Rand drill foreman, and in March, 1905, came to 
Lake County, Indiana, where a short time later he purchased his pres- 
ent beautiful farm of 168 acres, located in section 9, Center Township, 
one mile east of the courthouse at Crown Point, an ideal location and a 
well improved farm. Mr. Newton has shown that one can follow a cer- 
tain line of work for many years and then transfer his attentions to 
another line and meet with as great success. He has proven his worth 
as a farmer, even as he did as a mechanic, and his property gives 
every evidence of the presence of good management and thrift. Its 
buildings are commodious, substantial and architecturally handsome, 
his equipment is of modern manufacture and in a good state of repair, 
and his land is well drained, ditched and fenced. Mr. Newton carries 
on general farming, and specializes in thoroughbred Holstein cattle, 
although he has a few T grades, this being a fine herd and one which he is 
constantly improving. Mr. Newton's career is an excellent example of 
what may be accomplished by hard work and earnest purpose, and should 
prove encouraging to those who are just entering upon their life's 
endeavors. As a business man and a citizen, Mr. Newton bears the 
highest reputation, gained through honest dealing and strict integrity 
in all matters. 

In 1885 Mr. Newton was married to Miss Ellen M. Kellen, who was 
born and reared in Marquette County, Michigan, where the union took 
place. Five sons and two daughters, the same number as his parents', 
have been born to him: C. Harry, who is engaged in operating his 
father's farm f Edward K., a graduate of the Boulder (Colorado) Col- 
lege of Medicine and now practicing at Whiting, Indiana ; Henrietta, 
formerly a student of Northwestern University, and now a teacher in 
the public schools of Gary, Indiana ; William C, who resides at home 
and is being reared as a farmer ; Lowell, a student in the Northwestern 
University ; Samuel N., who is attending the Crown Point High School ; 



582 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

and Ellen M., who is also a pupil of that school. Mr. and Mrs. Newton 
and their children are devoted members of the Episcopal Church. In 
his political views he is a protectionist and republican and but once 
sought for public office. 

August W. Neunfeldt. Occasionally there arises an individual 
in our public life who, through the capacity for finding enjoyment 
in what he has to do, invests his duties with interest and enthusiasm 
and thus achieves astonishing results from his labors. These are essen- 
tials of success which are found in the public career of August W. Neun- 
feldt, who since January 1, 1907, has held the position of superintend- 
ent of the Lake County Poor Asylum, which at this time reflects his 
ideas and individuality, as against the blind following of methods of 
operation practiced by his predecessors. 

Mr. Neunfeldt is still a young man, but may well take a pardonable 
pride in what he has accomplished. He was born in 1875, near the City 
of Berlin, Germany, and is a son of August and Johanna (Haas) Neun- 
feldt, both of whom were born near that city. He was the third of four 
children, the eldest being dead and the others, Herman, a farmer of 
North Dakota ; and Tina. The family emigrated to the United States 
in 1884, locating first in Chicago, where they remained until 1892, and 
then came to Winfield Township, Lake County, Indiana, the father 
engaging in agricultural pursuits. This continued to be the residence 
place of the parents until 1909, when they moved to North Dakota 
to make their home with their son, Herman. 

Prior to coming to the United States, August W. Neunfeldt attended 
the public schools of his native land for a short time. He was a lad 
of nine years when he accompanied his parents to this country, and 
after locating in Chicago was not long in securing a working knowl- 
edge of the American language. He continued a pupil in the graded 
schools until fourteen years of age, and then laid aside his books and 
was variously employed until the family came to Lake County, where 
he was engaged in assisting in the work of the home place until his 
marriage. This occurred May 9, 1900, to Miss Mathilda Knopf, of Lake 
County, and following their union they resided in Chicago for one and 
one-half years, but eventually returned to Winfield Township and re- 
sumed farming. On January 1, 1907, Mr. Neunfeldt was elected to his 
present office by the board of county commissioners, and has been reap- 
pointed four times, the last time for a period of four years. In the 
fall of 1913, Mr. Neunfeldt assisted in organizing and became a mem- 
ber of the State Association of County Poor Superintendents. 

The Lake County Poor Asylum consists of a tract of 310 acres, all 
under a state of cultivation. When Mr. Neunfeldt arrived he found the 
place in poor repair, the buildings old and unsanitary, badly ventilated 
and in need of new equipment. For five years he labored assiduously 
to secure a new set of structures, and finally, in 1912, was successful 
in securing them, these costing some $200,000, and now said to be the 
finest in the state. While there have never been over 150 inmates, there 
are easily accommodations for 350, and if necessary 400 could be 
provided for. The institution is provided with its own steam heating 
and gas plant, the hospital and operating room are as well equipped as 
any private institution, living and sleeping rooms are separate, the 
ventilating system is the most highly approved known, and everything 
about the place is of the most modern kind, reflecting the careful. 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 583 

thrifty, progressive and energetic management of the superintendent. 
Mr. Neunfeldt may be said to be the right man in the right place ; he is 
kind, generous and considerate of those who are placed under his 
guardianship, yet is a strict disciplinarian, and when occasion demands 
is adamant. He has the assistance of five capable men and as many 
women assistants. Few public services are more to be commended than 
the careful protection of our worthy poor, and Mr. Neunfeldt 's labors 
should therefore place him among his community's most helpful citizens. 
Mr. and Mrs. Neunfeldt have had three children, the first two being 
twins : Paul, who died at the age of two weeks ; Karl, born in 1901, in 
Chicago ; and Loretta, born in 1903, in Lake County. Mr. and Mrs. 
Neunfeldt are members of the German Lutheran Church at Crown 
Point, of which Mr. Neunfeldt is a trustee. His political support is 
given to the republican party's candidates and principles. 

William Lawhan Handley. This representative business man of 
Crown Point bears a name that has been familiar in Lake County since 
the early days, he is himself a native of the county, and his active and 
successful business connections have brought him into relation with 
several different communities, in each of which he has been a leader, 
not only in his own line of business but in community affairs. 

William Lawhan Handley was born in Lake County on a farm Octo- 
ber 17, 1867, a son of George W. and Sarah (Gambrill) Handley. The 
education which he received in early life came almost entirely from 
the public scliools, and it has been by practical contact with men and 
affairs that he has developed his best faculties. Early in his business 
career he bought a drug store at Lowell, and lived there and was in 
business for fifteen years. Five years of that time he was president of 
the Lowell school board. After selling out his interests in Lowell, he 
bought a general store at Cedar Lake, conducted it two years, then 
turned his attention to farming, having a place in Cedar Creek Town- 
ship. After the experiences thus enumerated Mr. Handley moved to 
Crown Point, and once more identified himself with the drug business, 
and now conducts a well stocked and well equipped store, that is one 
of the principal trading points in the city. 

His connection with public affairs has continued since moving to the 
county seat, and in 1912 he was appointed to fill a vacancy in the office 
of city treasurer, and served in that capacity until January, 1914. Mr. 
Handley was one of the organizers of the Crown Point Chamber of 
Commerce and through that organization and as a private business 
man has worked and co-operated for the advancement of this com- 
munity. Fraternally he is a chapter Mason and belongs to the Inde- 
pendent Order of Foresters. Outside of business his chief recreation is 
found in automobiling, and for a number of years he has been one of 
Lake County's enthusiastic motorists. On December 31, 1887, Mr. Hand- 
ley marriecl Kate Blatchly, of Lowell, a daughter of Cornelius and 
Lizzie (Meske) Blatchly. 

Nathaniel L. Smith. The material development of Crown Point, 
through the erection of its residences, its school buildings and business 
blocks, owes much to the ability and enterprise of Nathaniel L. Smith 
during the last twenty years, and to his father in the preceding genera- 
tion. It has come to 'be the habit of Crown Point people when a build- 
ing of the better class is desired to have recourse to Nathaniel L. Smith, 
as the architect or building contractor. 



584 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

Nathaniel L. Smith was born in Crown Point, March 8, 1869, a son 
of Benjamin A. and Adelaide D. (Fuller) Smith. His father, who estab- 
lished his home in Lake County in 1865, did a valuable service as a con- 
tractor and builder, and during his activity erected at Crown Point 
the Catholic and Lutheran churches, a number of business blocks, and 
some of the best residences in the older quarter of the city. 

Nathaniel L. Smith grew up in Crown Point, was a student in the 
public schools until finishing the high school course, and trained for his 
career by serving three years as a pattern maker and then engaged in 
the practical work of building and architecture. He has drawn the 
plans as architect for nearly all the best residences in Crown Point. 
He is also architect of the following school buildings in Center Town- 
ship: Washington School, Schiller School, Lincoln School, Bellshaw 
School, and also the Demott High School Building, these being only a 
few examples of a long list that might be prepared. For the past twenty 
years practically all his time has been given to his profession as architect. 

Mr. Smith has also served his home city as city clerk for the past 
five years and is now a member of the board of health. Fraternally his 
associations are with the Masonic Order and the Independent Order of 
Foresters, belongs to the Business Men's League and to the Horse 
Thief Association. In December, 1894, Mr. Smith married Matilda Ett- 
ling, of Crown Point. Their three children are Faye, Thelma and 
Shirley. 

William Allen Scheddell. The best distinction in any line of 
business is permanent and continued success, and it is an honor which 
all recognize, when a man has succeeded in maintaining an establish- 
ment, against the difficulties which beset every enterprise, keeping it up 
to a high standard of service, and making it advance with the com- 
munity and with the requirements of the time, over a course of many 
years. William Allen Scheddell, who is regarded as one of the most 
progressive business men and citizens of Crown Point at the present 
time, has the distinction of owning the oldest drug store under one con- 
tinuous proprietorship in Lake County. It is more than thirty years 
since he established his business at Crown Point, and to hundreds of 
citizens both of the former and the present generation his store is a most 
familiar landmark in the business district. 

William Allen Scheddell was born in Stephenson County, Illinois, 
April 3, 1855, a son of Oliver Perry and Lucy Ann (Heiser) Scheddell. 
His parents were substantial farming people in Central Illinois, and 
it was as a farm boy that William A. Scheddell spent his youth, acquir- 
ing an education in the local schools and employing his spare time in 
the harvest fields from the age of ten to nineteen. After a brief experi- 
ence of three months in a dentist's office he was first introduced to the 
varied stock of an average drug store at the age of nineteen. His work 
as a clerk began in the summer of 1875 and continued until the fall 
of 1879. The drug business, and the same is true of other lines, requires 
experience as well as capital to conduct it successfully, and Mr. Sched- 
dell, having had an ample experience but with limited capital, in 1879 
embarked in business for himself at Winamac, Indiana, in partnership 
with J. E. Swartz, under the name Swartz & Scheddell. In August, 
1881, ill health compelled Mr. Scheddell to sell out, and after a rest of 
a few months he came to Crown Point and on November 23, 1881, 
bought out the store of H. M. Griffin. Then began his long career, for 





l/\ ct\_aJ) y^T^^in^iX^-t-^ 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 585 

nearly thirty-three years, in the local drug trade. It is a fact worthy 
of note that his first store was at 104 South Main Street, and that same 
number still marks his place of business, although his store is now in a 
new building. Mr. Scheddell has always been interested in the profes- 
sional side of his business and especially in the study of the eye. In 
1903 he took a long leave from the drug store and pursued the study of 
the eye, especially with reference to the proper fitting of glasses, at the 
Northern Illinois College of Optics in Chicago, from which he holds his 
degree of Doctor of Optics and in which line he has been particularly 
successful. Mr. Scheddell has also had an important part in local 
affairs. He was one of the promoters and a charter member of the 
Chamber of Commerce, and served as a member of the committee on 
constitution and by-laws. He is a member of the Indiana State Phar- 
macy Association and of the National Association of Retail Draggists, 
and is a director in the People's State Bank of Crown Point, having 
held that post for a number of years. Fraternally his affiliations are 
with Lake Lodge No. 157, A. F. & A. M., in which he is past master, and 
with Crown Point Lodge No. 314. Knights of Pythias, of which he was 
the first past chancellor. 

Mr. Scheddell was married February 19, 1883, to Miss Mabel Van 
Cleve Scull, who was born in Danville, Indiana, a daughter of J. F. and 
Emma (Yount) Scull. Her father was a prominent educator, and for 
twenty-two years served as superintendent of the public schools of 
Rochester, Indiana. 

Nicholas Emmerling. Since January 1, 1899, this name has stood 
for service of a particularly valuable nature in Hammond. Mr. Emmer- 
ling is a kindly and capable undertaker, and for fifteen years has given 
a service second to none in equipment, in care, and in distinctive appro- 
priateness in every detail. 

Nicholas Emmerling was born at Crown Point, Indiana, February 12, 
1869, and represents one of the old German- American families of Lake 
County. His parents were George and Catherine (Long) Emmerling. 
His father was an industrious farmer and for nine years was superin- 
tendent of the county asylum. Nicholas Emmerling received a public 
school education at Crown Point, and was one of the first graduates from 
the Chicago School of Embalming. He has been identified with his pres- 
ent profession ever since leaving the farm, and has been in Hammond 
since the beginning of 1899. His place of business is at 111 Sibley 
Street. 

Mr. Emmerling takes an active part in social and civic affairs of his 
home city. He belongs to the Hammond Commercial Club, the Catholic 
Order of Foresters, the Knights of Columbus, the Catholic Benevolent 
League, the Royal League, the Modern Woodmen of America, the North 
American Union, the L. 0. T. M., the Fraternal Order of Eagles, the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and the Knights of the Macca- 
bees. He and his family worship in the St. Joseph's Catholic Church. 
At Crown Point, on July 10. 1900, Mr. Emmerling married Ola May 
Mann. They have one child, Eltisa Catherine, who is now attending 
school. 

George J. Weis. One of the younger business men of Crown Point, 
George J. Weis began his career as a clerk, and finally reached that 
goal of every ambitious clerk, a mercantile enterprise of his own. 



586 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

George J. "Weis was born in Lake County, March 25, 1883, a son of 
the late Daniel and Barbara "Weis. His father was a pattern maker 
by trade. With an education acquired in the Crown Point public 
schools and the Catholic parochial schools, Mr. Weis spent twelve 
years, beginning with early boyhood as clerk in a grocery store, and in 
1906, at the age of twenty-three, established what is known to all the 
housewives of Crown Point as the Depot Meat & Fish Market. This 
enterprise he has made one of the most popular markets in the city, 
and at the same time has given the influence of a liberal public spirit 
to the promotion of the movements which make Crown Point a better 
and larger place in the scale of Lake County cities. 

Mr. Weis is a member of the Chamber of Commerce, belongs to the 
Catholic Order of Foresters and with his family worships in St. Mary's 
Church. He was married in 1909 to Wilhelmina Horst of Crown Point. 
They have lost one child, Genevieve Margaret, and their other daughter 
is Mary Angela. 

Otto J. Bruce. The membership of Mr. Bruce in the Lake County 
bar covers a period of more than twenty years. Anyone acquainted 
with the standing of the different lawyers during this period and with 
their activities as court and office practitioners, knows that Mr. Bruce is 
one of the ablest men in his profession and his professional and civic 
relations are sufficient proof of his success. 

Otto J. Bruce was born in Pulaski County, Indiana, October 25, 1870. 
His parents, farming people at Bruce Lake, are Daniel and Sarah 
(Hizer) Bruce. From the public schools Mr. Bruce continued his studies 
in the Central Indiana Normal College at Ladoga, graduating in 1890, 
was for three years a teacher in the country schools, and took his law 
course at the University of Michigan, which graduated him LL. D. in 
1893. In July of that year he opened his office at Crown Point, and 
has been connected on one side or the other with a large part of the 
important litigation tried in the local courts. Mr. Bruce served four 
years as deputy prosecuting attorney of the county and is now local 
attorney for the Chesapeake & Ohio Railway Company and a director 
of the South Side Trust & Savings Bank of Gary. Other public serv- 
ice has been as secretary of the board of education in 1913-14. 

Mr. Bruce affiliates with the Knights of the Maccabees, the Modern 
"Woodmen of America and the Knights of Pythias, is clerk of session in 
the Presbyterian Church and for the past twelve years has been super- 
intendent of the Sunday School. He is a member of the Crown Point 
Pleasure Club. 

On May 16, 1894, Mr. Bruce married Lilian May Foster of Ladoga, 
Indiana. Her parents are James W. and Louisa Foster, her father a 
prominent farmer and president of the Farmers & Merchants Bank at 
Ladoga. To their marriage have been born four children : Foster Otto, 
Leone Elizabeth, Robert Wallace, and Dorothy Lilian. 

Walter Stubbs Painter. There is not a citizen of Crown Point who 
does not speak with pride and commendation of the public schools of 
that community. "While other cities in the Calumet district surpass 
Crown Point as to value and extent of material equipment, in actual 
results as measured in the influences and thoroughness of training 
afforded to the pupils, the Crown Point schools will rank abreast of any 
in Northern Indiana. Any further description of the schools of Crown 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 587 

Point would be repetition, since an account is contained on other pages 
of this work, and it is only pertinent to speak at this point of the super- 
intendent of the public schools since 1911, a date which has been a point 
of beginning for many of the chief reforms and constructive exten- 
sions which have brought the local schools to their present high standing. 

Walter Stubbs Painter, whose name is well known among all Indiana 
educators, was born in Wabash, Indiana, August 30, 1878, a son of 
Henry W. and Mary (Stubbs) Painter. His father was a farmer, and 
the son while a boy lived in Wabash County, later moved to Henry 
County with his parents and attended the public schools there. His 
family being of that religious sect known as Quakers his education was 
continued in the Friends Academy at Spiceland and was completed by 
graduation in 1904 from Earlham College at Richmond, Indiana. He 
had begun his life work during college terms, and taught four years 
before graduation. Three years were spent as principal in a private 
school in Ohio, two years as superintendent of the Upland public 
schools, and after two years as superintendent at Lowell in Lake County 
Mr. Painter came to Crown Point in 1911 and is now beginning his 
fourth year of active service. He began attending the Columbia Univer- 
sity Summer School in 1911 and received the degree of Master of Arts 
in 1914, from that institution. 

Mr. Painter has numerous relations with educational and other 
organizations, including the National Geographic Society, the Superin- 
tendents Research Club of Indiana, the Indiana State Teachers' Asso- 
ciation, the City and Town Superintendents' Association of Indiana, 
the Northern Indiana Teachers' Association, the Lake County Teachers' 
Association, of which he has served as president, and he is now presi- 
dent of the Lake County High School Oratorical and Athletic Associa- 
tion. He and his family are members of the Friends Church. 

On August 2, 1905, Mr. Painter was married at Richmond to Jennie 
Bond, daughter of Jehiel and Anna Bond, who were farming people. 
Mr. and Mrs. Painter are the parents of two children, twins, Lowell W. 
and Mildred E. 

Amos Allman. One of the best remembered and most deserving of 
remembrance among the early settlers of Lake County was the late Amos 
Allman, who first became identified with Crown Point more than seventy 
years ago, and who was one of the foremost business men of the county 
until his death at Crown Point on January 14, 1897, when about seventy- 
two years of age. 

Amos Allman was born at Atwick, Yorkshire, England, February 17, 
1825, a son of Major and Margaret (Haxby) Allman. In 1826 the 
mother died, leaving six children, of whom Amos was the youngest, and 
in 1830 the family left England for Canada, and in 1843 they moved to 
Lake County. Amos Allman lived in Canada for several years while a 
boy, gained most of his school education there, and in 1842 began an 
apprenticeship at the tailor's trade in Sturgis, Michigan. Coming to 
Crown Point, in 1843, he took up work at his trade, but finally abandoned 
it on account of failing eyesight. For several years he was in mercan- 
tile business at Sturgis, Michigan, but in 1855 returned to Lake County 
and thereafter was a resident at Crown Point with the exception of a 
few years until his death. His father had served as county recorder 
until his death in 1856, and Amos Allman was elected to succeed him 
and filled the office for eight consecutive years. He was also for a time 



588 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

deputy revenue collector. On leaving the office of recorder, on account 
of his experience which had given him a thorough knowledge of land 
titles, he engaged in the abstract and real estate business, and has the 
distinction of having opened the first strictly abstract of title office in 
Lake County. He was a very successful business man, handled a vast 
volume of real estate transactions, and also did much development work 
in the improvement of real estate. 

Amos Allman was married November 26. 1857, to Olive Wilcox, who 
died June 1, 1859. On March 22, 1860, he married Miss Mary A. Luther, 
who was the mother of his five children. Mary (Luther) Allman belonged 
to a prominent Lake County pioneer family, was born in New Hampshire, 
October 18, 1832. In 1834 her parents, James and Irena (Ransom) 
Luther, moved West, to Indiana, took up a tract of wild land in Porter 
County, and in that county Mrs. Allman was reared and educated. Her 
children by her marriage to Amos Allman were: Walter L. ; Mary I., 
wife of Judge W. C. McMahan ; Claude W. ; Jessie May, wife of Frank 
B. Pattee; and Nellie L., wife of James B. Neal. 

Walter L. Allman. The Allman-Gary Title Company of Gary and 
Crown Point, has the oldest business of its kind in Lake County. It was 
founded by the late Amos Allman about 1864, and in 1872 he opened 
the first strictly abstract of title office in the county. The business has 
been continuous from that time until the present, when it is conducted 
under the title Allman-Garv Title Companv. Walter L. Allman became 
a member of the firm in 18*76, and Claude W. Allman in 1888. In 1907 
a consolidation of two abstract firms operating in the county occurred, 
and the business was conducted under the name Allman Bros. & Din- 
widdie until 1910, when the present firm was incorporated with a capital 
stock of $100,000. The company now has records and indexes concern- 
ing Lake County real estate running back for forty years, and such has 
been the record for reliability and accuracy of the company that it is 
said Piat its abstracts are accepted without question by attorneys every- 
where. The company now has two complete sets of abstract indexes, 
and keeps one at its office in Gary and the other at Crown Point. 

Walter L. Allman. a son of the late Amos Allman, was born in Crown 
Point. October 6, 1861. and has spent practically all his life in Lake 
County. He was educated in a select school and the public schools, and 
at the age of eleven began to learn typesetting in the office of the Crown 
Point Herald. When about fifteen he was taken into his father's office 
and was given a thorough training in the abstract of title business. At 
the age of twenty-one he was admitted to a partnership, and after his 
father's death became senior partner of Allman Bros. Mr. Allman 
became cashier of the Commercial Bank of Crown Point at its organiza- 
tion in 1895. and in 1904 was elected vice president of the institution. 
He was county auditor during most of the year 1905, being appointed 
by the connty'commissioners to fill a vacancy. He was also president of 
the town board of Crown Point from 1906 to 1909, during which time 
many public improvements were made. Mr. Allman, in 1892, married 
Miss Arvilla E. Sings, who died in 1894. In 1900 Miss Eva Dyer became 
his wife. She was born in Kankakee County, Illinois, a daughter of 
Thomas Henry and Alta (Smith) Dyer, was educated in the public 
schools of Crown Point and at the Chicago Female College in Morgan 
Park. Illinois. Previous to her marriage she was a successful teacher. 
Mr. and Mrs. Allman have two children, a son. Amos Dyer, born April 




Uaax^JZ /6 \\jlaAjia_, 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 589 

8, 1901, and a daughter, Ada, born June 10, 1911. Walter L. Airman is 
affiliated with the Knights of Pythias, is a republican in politics, and has 
for a number of years been one of the most influential men in business 
and public spirited in all his relations with the community. 

Judge Virgil S. Reiter. Now serving as judge of the Superior 
Court at Hammond, Virgil S. Reiter has been a member of the Indiana 
bar and in active practice for the past twenty-five years. He has exempli- 
fied all the success and the generous public service of a most representa- 
tive lawyer. He has been honored on a number of occasions with posi- 
tions of responsibility and trust, and though he began life without special 
advantages, has found a place in the front ranks of the learned profession 
and is an influential factor in public affairs. 

Virgil S. Reiter was born in Fulton County, Indiana, September 17, 
1864. His parents were Jacob M. and Susan (Bair) Reiter, his father 
having been for many years identified with business as a general mer- 
chant. Judge Reiter spent most of his boyhood and youth at Rochester, 
Indiana, where he attended the public schools, finishing his course there 
in 1881. In Heidelberg College, at Tiffin, Ohio, he took the classical 
course and was graduated in June, 1886, Bachelor of Arts. Returning 
to Rochester, he applied himself energetically to the study of law, and 
was admitted to the bar in 1889. The first four years of his active prac- 
tice was spent in Rochester, and he served that city as city attorney from 
1889 to 1893. Since August, 1893, Judge Reiter has been a resident of 
Hammond, and in this city and vicinity has enjoyed a large general prac- 
tice as lawyer, having had his full share of the local business in the vari- 
ous countj' and state courts. Officially he served as city attorney from 
1902 to 1904, and in 1900 was appointed United States commissioner. The 
latter office he held until his appointment as judge of the Superior Court 
in August, 1907. Under that appointment he filled the office until 1909, 
and in the meantime, in 1908, was regularly elected to the term of six 
years, which expires in 1915. Judge Reiter has made an enviable record 
as a jurist, and as a trial judge has the utmost confidence and respect of 
both the bar and the laity. Judge Reiter was county chairman of the 
Republican Central Committee from 1898 to 1902. 

In October, 1897, he married Miss Josephine Kingsley, of Hammond, 
a daughter of Edward H. and Frances M. Kingsley, her father having 
been formerly a merchant at Jackson, Michigan. To the marriage have 
been born two children : Eline Frances and Virgil S., Jr. 

Since its organization Judge Reiter has been president of the Ham- 
mond Chamber of Commerce, which became an institution for the wel- 
fare of Hammond and as a means of co-operation for local business men in 
1912. He worships in the Presbyterian church, and fraternally is a 
Knight Templar Mason, a member of the Mystic Shrine, and belongs 
to the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks. He also has membership in the Hammond Country Club, the 
Hamilton Club of Chicago, and has a large acquaintance with prominent 
men in public and business life both in Lake County and elsewhere in 
Northern Indiana and in Chicago. 

John Brown. The First National Bank of Crown Point is the 
pioneer banking house of Lake County, and it is a matter of pride to all 
who have been connected with that institution that not only has the bank 
continued steadily to perform its appropriate service in the business com- 



590 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

munity, without the loss of a dollar to its depositors, but also for the 
fact that its influence has undeniably been strongly effective in upholding 
the conservative and substantial prestige of all other banking institutions 
of the county. The First National is a splendid bank, with prestige, 
age, influence and solid integrity. It is a fine monument to the business 
power of the community, and also to those who were identified with its 
founding and with its successful administration through forty years. 

The First National Bank was established in 1874, and John Brown, 
now its president, was one of the original incorporators, and is now the 
dean of Lake County bankers. Its first president was James Burge, 
who was succeeded by David Turner, and Mr. Brown became the third 
president. Its capital stock and surplus now total $100,000, and a few 
years ago the bank erected a stone building costing $22,000 on the site 
of the old banking house which had been occupied for thirty-five years. 

It is as banker and business man, soldier, farmer and stock raiser, 
public official and leading citizen, that John Brown is known to Lake 
County and in fact to all Northwestern Indiana. He is one of the oldest 
families in Lake County, and John Brown himself was born in Eagle 
Creek Township of this county October 7, 1840. Of Scotch ancestry, 
his grandfather, also named John Brown, was born in New York State, 
held the rank of major in the American troops during the War of 1812. 
was active in public affairs, and was ninety-three years of age at the 
time of his death. Alexander F. Brown, father of the Crown Point 
banker, was born in Schenectady County, New York, in 1804, and in 1S37 
established a home in Eagle Creek Township of Lake County, among the 
few pioneers then occupying not only that township but the entire area 
of this county. With his own labors he hewed a farm out of the wilder- 
ness, and through his industry, his fine moral and Christian character, 
and acknowledged usefulness in the community, was regarded as one of 
the leading citizens. In politics he was a stanch whig. A Presbyterian, 
he did much to further and build up the activities of that church. 
Besides his work as a farmer he also did railroad building by contract, 
and continued active in business until he met his death in a runaway 
accident in 1849, when only forty-five years of age. Alexander F. 
Brown married Eliza M. Barringer, who was born in the same part of 
New York as her husband, and who died in Lake County when seventy- 
three years of age. She was a pioneer woman possessed of the many 
simple yet sturdy virtues of womanhood which have so many times been 
attributed to the courageous women who shared with their husbands the 
toils and difficulties of the frontier. When her husband died she had a 
family of five children, and it was her influence and her practical man- 
agement of business affairs that gave them a good training and enabled 
them to start in life without any distinct disadvantages. These children 
were named : Mary ; John ; William B. ; Anna ; and George, who was 
born after his father's death and died at the age of twenty-nine. 

John Brown was reared on a farm, and while attending school with 
perhaps as much regularity as the average boy of that time and com- 
munity, he also did much to assist his widowed mother. At the age of 
twenty-one, in 1862, John Brown enlisted for service in the Civil war as 
a private in Company I of the Fifth Indiana Cavalry. He subsequently 
became a sergeant in his company, and his military record was one of 
active and faithful service through some of the hardest campaigns of 
the war. He was sent South into Kentucky, and was with the troops 
which pursued John Morgan on his raid through Indiana and Ohio, and 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 591 

was in the engagement which terminated that raid and resulted in the 
capture of Morgan and many of his men. He was also with the army 
of Burnside in Tennessee and participated in the battle of Knoxville. 
During 1864 he was in the great campaign which terminated with the 
fall of Atlanta. However, Mr. Brown, as a participant in the Stoneman 
raid, was captured at Sunshine Church on July 31, and for the next 
seven months, until about March, 1865, had to endure the rigors of 
southern prisons. He was confined at Andersonville two months, then 
sent to Charleston, then to Florence, South Carolina, and was kept in the 
stockades until released. He was mustered out of service June 27, 1865, 
at Indianapolis, after three years of service. 

Returning to Lake County, Mr. Brown began his business career as 
a farmer, and also engaged in stock buying. Public affairs for a number 
of years shared his time and energies, together with business, and in 
1870 he was elected county treasurer, and in that year moved to Crown 
Point. In 1872 he was reelected, and in 1876 was elected county auditor, 
and served two terms of four years each in that office. 

Mr. Brown occupies probably the most distinctive position in North- 
western Indiana as a landowner. He is the proprietor of a large ranch 
of 7,000 acres in Lake County, located along the Kankakee River. Such 
large bodies of land devoted to stock raising under one ownership is of 
course not uncommon in the Southwest and West, but in a country 
which has been settled and under development for seventy or eighty 
years, it is extremely unusual. Mr. Brown's son now is engaged in the 
active management of this vast farm and stock ranch. Mr. Brown served 
as vice president of the First National Bank for a time, and has occupied 
the position of president since 1881. He is president of the Business 
Men's Association of Crown Point. In recent years he has done much 
to extend the accommodations and service of transportation about Crown 
Point, and is vice president of the Gary & Southern Electric Railway, 
of which he was one of the organizers. It was Mr. Brown who took 
perhaps the leading part in the establishment of a public library in 
Crown Point, and has been president of the board since its organization. 
Fraternally his Masonic relations have extended to the commandery, and 
he is affiliated with the Grand Army post. 

Mr. Brown first married Almira Clark. The three children of that 
marriage are: Neil, who is his father's right-hand man on the ranch 
at Selby; Mary Alice, living at home; and Grace Almira, the wife of 
Edward S. Davis of Chicago. After the death of his first wife 
Mr. Brown married Myrtle E. Ashton, and his present wife was Jennie 
E. Northrup. 

George Elmer Hershman. Though his practice as a member of the 
Lake County bar has extended over only about seven years, few of his 
professional associates have so valuable and important practice as George 
E. Hershman of Crown Point. 

George Elmer Hershman was born at Asphaltum, Jasper County, 
Indiana, January 29, 1885, and for all of his accomplishments has not 
yet celebrated his thirtieth birthday. His parents, Walter H. and Anna 
C. (Sager) Hershman, were Jasper County farmers. After a public 
school training he graduated in 1904 from the law department of the 
Valparaiso University, was admitted to the bar in June of the same 
year, and at once set up in practice at Rensselaer, Indiana. In Septem- 
ber, 1907, Mr. Hershman moved to Crown Point, and besides a general 



592 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

practice has been called upon for a large amount of service as attorney 
for corporations. Mr. Hershman is attorney for the Chicago & Erie 
Railroad, Grand Trunk & Western Railroad, the New York, Chicago & 
St. Louis Railroad, the Michigan Central Railway, the Edward Hines 
Lumber Company of Chicago, the Able Transfer Company of Chicago, 
the Town of Schererville, Lake County, Indiana, and has also performed 
a large amount of abstract work for the abstract and title companies. 

Besides his membership in the Lake County Bar Association, 
Mr. Hershman is a past noble grand of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, a member of the Rebekahs, and Encampment, is acting consul 
of the local camp of the Modern Woodmen of America, belongs to the 
Royal Neighbors of America, and his church is the Methodist. On 
August 29, 1907, at Rensselaer, Indiana, Mr. Hershman married Lillie 
May Wright. Their two children are Esther A. and Harold W. 

Ernest H. Hixon. Among the prosperous and substantial farmers 
of Lake County, Indiana, whose successful careers reflect credit upon 
the community in which they live, is the worthy citizen of section 9, 
Center Township, to whom this personal record pertains. A native son 
of the county, practically his entire life has been passed within its limits, 
and he belongs to a family that has had its residence here since 1839 
and members of which have at all times occupied high places in agricul- 
ture, in business, and in social and public life. Mr. Hixon was born on 
his father's farm in Wintield Township, Lake County, December 12, 
1864, and is a son of Loren and Martha (Lawrence) Hixon, the former 
of whom died at Valparaiso, Indiana, at the age of seventy-four years, 
and the latter in Winfield Township when thirty-four years of age. 

Jeremiah Hixon, the paternal grandfather of Ernest H. Hixon, was 
a native of Pennsylvania, and came to Lake County, Indiana, in 1839, 
being among the first white settlers, while the Indians were still numer- 
ous, Mr. Hixon acquiring a fair knowledge of their language. A con- 
tractor and builder by occupation, he constructed a number of light- 
houses along the shores of Lake Michigan, and was also the builder of the 
first courthouse at Crown Point. Although he followed contracting and 
building throughout his entire life, he resided on a farm in Winfield 
Township which he had secured from the Government on first coming to 
Winfield Township, and on which he built his home, a structure of logs. 
Loren Hixon was still a lad w T hen he accompanied his father from the 
Pennsylvania home to the practical wilderness of Lake County, and here 
he was reared amid pioneer surroundings. The educational opportuni- 
ties in this vicinity at that time being decidedly limited, he was sent to 
Buffalo, New York, by his father, and there remained several years 
attending school, and following this was for several years a sailing master 
on the Great Lakes. About that time he was married and returned to 
Winfield Township, where he took up land, improved and operated it for 
many years, and developed a good farm. In the evening of life, with a 
handsome and well-earned competency, he retired from active pursuits, 
and moved to Crown Point. His death occurred at Valparaiso. Polit- 
ically he was a republican. Mr. and Mrs. Hixon were the parents of 
three children : Charles, who is now deceased ; Ernest H., of this review ; 
and Walter, a resident of Chicago. 

The early education of Ernest H. Hixon was secured in the country 
schools of Winfield Township, but when he was twelve years of age accom- 
panied his parents to Crown Point, where the city graded and high 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 593 

schools furnished him with the balance of his training. While a member 
of the senior class of the Crown Point High School he laid aside his 
books and as a lad of nineteen years went to Chicago to accept a position 
in the wholesale dry goods department of the great firm of Carson, 
Pirie, Scott & Company. After three years of mercantile experience 
Mr. Hixon returned to Lake County arid began farming on his father's 
old place in Winfield Township. Later for twelve years he was located 
on a property in Eagle Creek Township, formerly owned by his father- 
in-law, but disposed of his interests therein in 1897 and purchased his 
present tract, at that time an unimproved property of ninety-four acrejs, 
lying outside of the city limits, although it has since been included in the 
corporate limits of Crown Point. Here Mr. Hixon has made improve- 
ments of a valuable and handsome character. His buildings are of the 
best, as are his machinery and equipment, and the enviable results which 
he achieves from his labors forcibly prove that he is thoroughly con- 
versant with every angle of farm work. In addition to his homestead 
farm Mr. Hixon is the owner of a property in Ross Township, just north 
of Crown Point. From 1909 until 1913 Mr. Hixon was a majority 
stockholder and manager of the Crown Point Electric Company, and 
various other enterprises have had the benefitting guidance of his able 
management and executive ability. In years past he had much to do 
with farmers' institutes, and was one of the first to advocate and realize 
the advantages of good roads, which have since become such a vital 
issue. 

Mr. Hixon was married in 1888 to Miss Amy Crawford, of Eagle 
Creek Township, Lake County, and to them there have been born five 
children, as follows : Walter C, who died in 1913 when twenty years 
of age, had just graduated from Crown Point High School and had a 
most promising future ; Ralph M., who graduated from the Crown Point 
High School in the class of June, 1914; and Helen Grace, Mary, and 
Margaret Amy, all of whom are attending that institution. The family 
is connected with the Presbyterian Church. In political matters 
Mr. Hixon is a republican. 

Mrs. Hixon is a daughter of John A. and Adeline (Staley) Crawford, 
natives of Montgomery County, New York, where the former was born 
December 19, 1814, and the latter December 3, 1823. They came to Lake 
County, Indiana, in 1844, and took up Government land in Eagle Creek 
Township, Mr. Crawford continuing to add to his original entry until he 
owned 600 acres, and at his death left a valuable estate, although at the 
time of his arrival he owned but $75. Mr. Crawford passed away in 
Eagle Creek Township, August 14, 1874, while the mother survived him 
until December 3, 1902. and died at Crown Point. 

Harry B. Nicholson. One of the moving spirits in Crown Point 
social, civil and public life is Harry B. Nicholson, who grew up in this 
county, has always been a man of genial manner, with a large circle of 
friends and political associates, and has shown efficiency in every position 
whether in private business or in public office. 

Harry B. Nicholson was born in Lake County, April 29, 1871, a son 
of William C. and Anna (Brown) Nicholson. His father was a car- 
penter, a man in only ordinary circumstances, and though the son was 
educated through the Crown Point High School, he has had his own way 
to make in the world since boyhood. Eight years were spent as book- 
keeper for a grain company, and that was followed by his appointment 



594 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

as deputy county clerk. He twice filled that office for periods of four 
years, aud beiug then well seasoned by experience and with a large 
acquaintance over the county, he became a candidate for county treas- 
urer, and made a splendid campaign for the republican nomination, but 
was defeated in the convention by a combination of two factious against 
him, though his defeat was compassed by only forty-one hundredths of 
a vote. The following year was spent in the West in order to regain his 
health, and he then worked as bookkeeper one year with the Pennsylvania 
Railway Company at Chicago. Returning to Crown Point, Mr. Nichol- 
son accepted an appointment on March 13, 1906, to the office of justice 
of the peace, his appointment having come from the Board of County 
Commissioners. On November 6, 1906, he was elected to that office and 
was again chosen on November 8, 1910. 

Mr. Nicholson was one of the organizers and the first president of the 
Crown Point Commercial Club, and was also a charter member of the 
Chamber of Commerce. He has served as past chancellor of the Knights 
of Pythias, and is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks at Hammond. 

David Maney. Though a lawyer by training and profession, 
Mr. Maney has for some years been identified with one of the largest 
concerns in Lake County occupying the title and abstract and general 
financial field. Mr. Maney was for several months a resident of Gary 
and actively connected with its business affairs, but now lives in Crown 
Point. 

David Maney was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, September 13, 1872, 
son of David and Ann (Wilson) Maney. The family in 1881 emigrated 
to America and located in Chicago, Illinois. The father was a miller by 
trade, and held degrees in the Masonic order. David Maney attended the 
grammar and high schools at Chicago, and after leaving school entered 
the employ of Haddock, Vallette & Rickcords, abstractors, in Chicago. 
When that firm was merged with the Chicago Title and Trust Company, 
Mr. Maney remained with the larger concern until 1910, and then located 
in Gary as vice president of the Allman-Gary Title Company. Since 
July 1, 1910, his home has been in Crown Point, where he has looked after 
the business of the company. While connected with the Chicago Title 
and Trust Company in Chicago Mr. Maney studied law at the John 
Marshall Law School, and was admitted to the bar in 1906. 

Mr. Maney has membership in the Gary Commercial Club, and took 
his first degrees in Masonry at Chicago, Illinois, on December 7, 1895, 
and has since gone through the Royal Arch Chapter and the Council of 
Royal and Select Masters and Commandery. He also belongs to the 
Shrine. Mr. Maney was married to Rose E. Matson of Chicago, a 
daughter of Peter Matson. Their two children are named Ann Wilson 
and Ida May. 

Eugene Alfred Griswold. Hammond people recognize E. A. Gris- 
wold as one of its most substantial business men and public spirited 
citizens. The position he has attained is one that would be creditable to 
any man. It was hard work, ability to face obstacles and to take hard 
knocks, and a certain persistency and quickness to take advantage of the 
lessons of experience, that raised him from a poor and half educated 
working boy to his present affluence. 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 595 

Eugene Alfred Griswold was born at Ravenna, Ohio, April 5, 1869, 
a son of Levi and Eliza Griswold, and both parents died when the boy 
was five years of age. Such education as he was able to acquire in the 
intervals of work was supplied by country schools. In his tender years 
he sometimes had to resort to the expedient of playing a mouth organ 
on the streets in order to earn a meal. Five years of his youth were spent 
in work in a wholesale feed and produce house at Garrettsville, Ohio, as a 
check boy. He then worked as water boy for a contractor, and, becoming 
master of details, was promoted to foreman of a force of workmen build- 
ing brick and sewer construction, following that work for three years. 
In 1894 Mr. Griswold came to Hammond, and in 1896 established a cigar 
and confectionery store. Later a stock of groceries and meats were 
added, and all the surplus of his merchandising was invested in real 
estate, and he built and sold several houses on unimproved property. 
Mr. Griswold opened the first ice cream parlor in Hammond, and is still 
proprietor of a large store supplying high class articles of food to the 
people of Hammond. His store is in a fine two-story pressed brick block 
with a frontage of 33 feet on State Street and 132 feet on Sohl Street. 
Besides his own store there are three others which he rents, and above are 
seven flats. 

Mr. Griswold was married at Hammond in 1894 to Zylpha Hubbard. 
They have one son, Alfred Eugene, Jr., born November 30, 1895, and 
now a member of the firm of E. A. Griswold & Son. The senior Mr. Gris- 
wold is a past noble grand in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

William H. Tuthill. The ranks of Crown Point's successful busi- 
ness men include William H. Tuthill, who still in his thirties has 
employed his energies to such good purpose as to own a substantial 
and growing business and to occupy a position of influence in that com- 
munity. 

The Tuthill family has long been identified with Crown Point and 
vicinity, and William H. Tuthill is a native of the county seat, born 
March 11, 1878. His parents were Marion E. and Mary (Fuller) Tut- 
hill. His father was a painting contractor. With an education acquired 
at the public schools of Crown Point and Lowell, Mr. Tuthill learned a 
trade under his father's direction, and for fifteen years was engaged in 
painting contracting at Crown Point. In April, 1909, Mr. Tuthill opened 
a coal yard, and also represents several lines of fire insurance, and has 
a good business in both departments. 

His representative business and social relations include membership 
in the Chamber of Commerce and the Business Men's Association, and 
he has been quite prominent in Odd Fellowship, being past noble grand 
of his lodge, has served as a delegate to the state grand lodge, is a mem- 
ber of the Encampment and also of the Rebekahs. Other fraternities 
in which he has membership are the Modern Woodmen of America, and 
the Royal Neighbors. 

On October 13, 1896, Mr. Tuthill married Adella Fleming, of Crown 
Point, a daughter of a well known citizen, William Fleming. To their 
marriage has been born one child, Cecil Clarence, now thirteen years of 
age and attending the public schools. 

George W. Frederick. More than thirty years have passed since 
George W. Frederick became identified with Crown Point, and in that 
then small village he was employed for several years in the humble 



596 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

capacity of clerk. He has steadily worked his way to greater prosperity, 
has utilized the opportunities at hand and has kept his eye on the future, 
and is now one of that city's substantial business men and influential 
citizens. 

George W. Frederick, who first came to Crown Point in 1880, was 
born in Greensburg, Indiana, June 6, 1863, a son of Wolfgang and Sarah 
Frederick. His father was a farmer in Southern Indiana, and the family 
is of German stock. When George W. Frederick came to Crown Point 
he spent three years as clerk in the Depot Hotel, and was in railway 
service for a number of years. For some time he was connected with the 
Illinois Central at Pullman, and for three years was with the Chicago 
Street Railway Company. After getting a little capital and with his 
broad experience in other affairs, Mr. Frederick bought equipment and 
took up the business of sinking tubular wells, and has continued in that 
line ever since, his facilities enabling him to take contracts and perform 
this kind of work with a reliability and promptness that has kept his 
force in almost constant demand. In 1906 Mr. Frederick opened a 
plumbing establishment in Crown Point, and that is now the chief source 
of his business prosperity. 

Mr. Frederick has identified himself with the community in various 
ways, is a director and one of the original members of the Chamber of 
Commerce, is affiliated with the Independent Order of Foresters and the 
Modern Woodmen of America, and he and his family belong to the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. On October 1, 1897, Mr. Frederick mar- 
ried Ida P. Kline, of an old family in Lake County. Their three chil- 
dren are named Grant W., Bernice May, and Enoch Arden. 

Edward J. Eder. The Lake County Title and Guaranty Company, 
incorporated in 1905 with a capital stock of $50,000, was the first firm 
of abstractors to incorporate the business in this county. No other com- 
pany of the kind has such complete facilities, nor such abundant 
resources. All its capital stock is owned by Lake County people, more 
than a hundred in number, and the individual wealth of these stock- 
holders is estimated in the aggregate at more than five million dollars. 
Besides the main office at Crown Point there are branch offices both in 
Hammond and Gary. The company recently completed a building at 
Crown Point, 27 by 90 feet and two stories brick, the postoffice occupying 
the ground floor and the company's offices on the second. Besides the 
officers of the company eleven people are employed in the various depart- 
ments. It has a complete set of abstract records of Lake County. 

The officers of the company are : F. R. Mott, president ; Frank Ham- 
mond, vice president; Albert Maack, secretary and treasurer; and 
Edward J. Eder, manager. The directors are all prominent citizens, 
bankers, business men, and are : A. M. Turner, Peter W. Meyn, Frank 
Hammond, F. R, Mott, Oscar A. Krinbill, J. S. Blackmun, Paul B. 
Lipinski, George B. Sheerer, and H. E. Jones. 

As manager of the company's business at Crown Point, Edward J. 
Eder has peculiar qualifications for this work and is one of the promi- 
nent young business men of Lake County and represents one of the 
old families. He was born at Crown Point, November 8, 1881, a son of 
George M. and Frances (Scheerer) Eder. From the common schools 
he entered Valparaiso University, graduating in 1900, and then spent 
two years in the law school of the Northwestern University at Chicago. 
Admitted to the bar in 1902, Mr. Eder practiced his profession two years 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 597 

in Hammond, and then joined the Lake County Title and Guaranty 
Company at Crown Point. He has held the office of manager for the 
past six years. 

Mr. Eder is a member of the Crown Point Chamber of Commerce, 
and belongs to St. Mary's Catholic Church, with fraternal affiliations 
with the Knights of Columbus and the Catholic Order of Foresters. He 
married Emma K. Krost, of Hammond. Their one child is Mary 
Frances. 

William Frederick Houk. M. D. During the past ten years Doctor 
ITouk has well established his reputation as a reliable physician and 
surgeon at Crown Point, and has built up a large practice both in the 
city and surrounding country. Doctor Houk is also local surgeon for 
the Pennsylvania Railway Company at Crown Point. 

Born in Lake County, Indiana. December 1, 1876, his parents were 
John and Maggie (Fehlman) Houk, who represented families that set- 
tled in Lake County in the early '50s and were consequently among the 
pioneers who helped to develop this part of Indiana. Doctor Houk grew 
up on a farm, with the usual advantages of the district schools, had his 
collegiate training in the Northwestern College at Naperville, Illinois, 
and took his medical course in the Chicago College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, where he graduated in 1904. His practice in Crown Point 
began in October of the same year, and his practice is a general one. 
Doctor Houk for the past seven years has been deputy coroner of Lake 
County, and has membership in the Indiana and Lake County Medical 
societies. Fraternally his relations are with the Masonic order, the 
Knights of Pythias and the Modern Woodmen of America. 

On July i4, 1904, soon after graduating in medicine, Doctor Houk 
married Delia Van Sciver of Lake County. Her parents were William 
and Kate (Patton) Van Sciver of Lake County. 

Levi E. Bailey. A representative of one of the oldest families in 
Lake County, where its various members have taken part in the develop- 
ment of the land from wilderness conditions since pioneer settlement, 
Levi E. Bailey has himself spent most of his career in the county, 
although not a native, and in addition to his substantial position in agri- 
cultural circles has also been honored with public office, and was formerly 
county treasurer. 

Levi E. Bailey was born in Yellowhead Township, Kankakee County, 
Illinois. January 9. 1858. His ancestors have been Americans for a 
number of generations, and lived at various times in North Carolina, 
Pennsylvania and Ohio. His grandfather, John Bailey, was one of the 
pioneers in LaPorte County, Indiana. Josiah B. Bailey, father of Levi, 
was born in LaPorte County, Indiana, and was a boy when the family 
established its home in Lake County. Josiah B. Bailey was born in 1835, 
and died in West Creek Township of Lake County November 25, 1902. 
He was esteemed as one of the most worthy citizens of his community, and 
his was a sturdy, upright character that left a permanent impress on the 
activities of every community with which he was associated. With the 
exception of a few years spent in Kankakee County, Illinois, he had his 
home in Lake County all his years. He was a substantial farmer in West 
Creek Township, served as supervisor of that township and one of the 
citizens who did much to promote the early building of gravel roads in 
this county. On March 19, 1857, he married Nancy E. Kile, who died 



598 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

April 18, 1876. Their children were Levi E., Charles T., George B., and 
Grace. Josiah Bailey in 1877 married Mrs. Amelia Sanger. 

Levi E. Bailey attended the district schools in Lake County and at the 
age of twenty-two he started in life on his own account, was for three 
years a farmer in Kankakee County, and then permanently identified 
himself with Lake County in West Creek Township. His interests as a 
farmer and land owner have substantially increased during the successive 
years, and through his individual work and business like supervision 
many of the fertile acres of Lake County have been made to produce their 
crops with an unvarying success, and his labors are now represented in a 
substantial property. 

Since 1903, Mr. Bailey's home has been in Crown Point, where he is 
one of the progressive citizens. His removal to the county seat was the 
result of his election in 1902 to the office of county treasurer. He took 
up the duties of his office on January 1, 1901, and in the meantime in 
September, 1903, he moved his family to Crown Point. In 1904 Mr. 
Bailey was re-elected for a second term as treasurer. He has a number 
of interests outside of his land holdings. He is an active republican, hav- 
ing identified himself with that organization early in life and fraternally 
is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias and the Independent Order of 
Foresters. Mr. Bailey was married in 1880 to Miss Emma Hayden, a 
native of West Creek Township, and a daughter of Daniel and Louisa 
Hayden, who are numbered among the pioneer settlers of Lake County. 
Mr. Bailey and wife became the parents of four children: Nancy, who 
married Loren Love ; Murray ; Merritt ; and Bennett. 

Alexander John Campbell. A native of the maritime province of 
Nova Scotia, Alexander J. Campbell in early manhood became identified 
with railroad and electric work, lived in Michigan for a number of years, 
filled positions all the way from telegraph operator to superintendent of 
electrical railways, and since 1894 has been a resident of Hammond. 
Mr. Campbell is one of the foremost men in business affairs in this city. 
Besides a business owned and conducted under his own name, he is an 
officer in several well known corporations and has a place of distinctive 
leadership in local affairs. 

Born in Nova Scotia, Canada, June 19, 1852, a son of farming peo- 
ple, John and Mary Campbell, after his education in the schools of his 
native province, Alexander John Campbell entered the railway service 
at the age of nineteen, and a year later settled in Durand, Michigan. 
He was a telegraph operator and ticket agent for a railroad company, 
and about the time electricity supplanted horse power and steam power 
largely in urban transportation he became identified with local trans- 
portation lines, and for several years was with the Grand Rapids Street 
Railway Company in Michigan. From there he went to Chicago, and was 
electrical engineer for the South Chicago Street Railway Company, and 
had charge of the electrical engineering department. 

On coming to Hammond in 1894, Mr. Campbell took the superin- 
tendency of the Hammond, Whiting & East Chicago Electric Lines. 
After those lines were sold he rebuilt the Hammond Electric and Gas 
Company, was manager of the plant, and was one of three men who 
bought the business and conducted it until he sold his interest in 1903 
and engaged in business for himself. At that time he took up work as 
a contractor in plumbing and sewer construction, organizing the Camp- 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 599 

bell Plumbing Company, which is owned and conducted entirely by 
himself. 

Mr. Campbell is also secretary and treasurer of the Calumet Sewer 
Construction Company, of which Charles Lavene is president. He organ- 
ized the Campbell Realty Company, which owns thirteen blocks in West 
Hammond. He is president of the West Hammond Trust and Savings 
Bank. Mr. Campbell is a member of the Hammond Commercial Club 
and affiliates with the Masonic order. 

By his marriage to Susie S. Adair of Rochester, New York, there are 
two children : R. Adair, who is connected with J. P. Marsh & Company 
of Chicago, and Margaret Mary, the wife of J. Adair Young, a member 
of the firm of Young Bros., general merchants, of Camrose, Alberta, 
Canada. 

Eugene Harrington Crowell. There is probably no contractor in 
Lake County whose business relations continued over a period of a quar- 
ter of a century had included more important public works than Eugene 
H. Crowell, of Crown Point. Mr. Crowell is one of the men who, start- 
ing out as an individual worker at a trade, gradually built up a busi- 
ness employing the services of others, and eventually attained front 
rank in business circles. 

Though his home has been in Lake County since infancy, Eugene 
Harrington Crowell was born in Cass County, Michigan, April 14, 1863, 
and his parents, William E. and Elizabeth (Simpson) Crowell, came to 
Lake County in 1864. His father w r as an active merchant until he retired 
from business, and is now deceased, while the mother resides with her 
son Eugene. Mr. Crowell has made his career as a result of sheer force 
of ability, rather than by education or by the help of family and friends. 
Such education as he obtained was from the public schools, but he has 
been in the ranks of the world's workers since nine years of age. As a 
boy he learned the trade of brick layer, and after some years as a journey- 
man worker began taking small contracts and using the services of other 
workmen, and from that early beginning twenty-five years ago has 
developed a business hardly second to none in the county. A brief men- 
tion of some of the more important works performed by Mr. Crowell will 
serve to illustrate the scope of his business. He constructed the First 
National Bank Building, the Allman Building, the High School Building, 
and the Broadway bridge over the Calumet River all in Crown Point, the 
concrete and stone bridge over the Calumet in Hammond, and has con- 
structed about twenty-five blocks of paving, curbing and macadam work 
in Crown Point, Six schoolhouses in the county have been erected by 
his firm in recent years, and another contract was the construction of the 
steel bridge over the Kankakee River at Schneider, Indiana. Mr. Crowell 
has a plant for the manufacture of concrete blocks and all kinds of specifi- 
cation material in concrete. 

In fraternal affairs he has long been active, is a past master of his 
Masonic Lodge, and also affiliates with the Knights Templar and the 
Mystic Shrine ; is a past noble grand of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and past chancellor of the Knights of Pythias. He is a mem- 
ber and trustee of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Crown Point. In 
October, 1894, occurred his marriage to Mary A. Fancher, of Crown 
Point, a member of the prominent pioneer family of that name in the 
county. They are the parents of two children: Theresa Marie is the 
wife of Edward Knight, a Crown Point attorney ; and Cecil Eugenie is 
a pupil in the public schools. 



600 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

Frank Benton Pattee. Mr. Pattee 's connection with the Lake 
County bar has been maintained for nearly fifteen years, and among 
his associates practicising in the various courts of the county his standing 
is of the highest, and his successful activities as a lawyer and influence 
as a citizen speak for themselves. 

Frank Benton Pattee was born in Kankakee, Illinois, September 24, 
1873. As a boy he attended the public schools, took the Bachelor of 
Science course at the Valparaiso University, and was graduated in 1900 
LL. B. at the University of Wisconsin. His practice as a member of the 
bar at Crown Point began in November, 1900. Mr. Pattee is a member 
of the Lake County and the Indiana State Bar Association, of the 
Crown Point Commercial Club, is secretary of the Business Men's Asso- 
ciation, and is a member of the Masonic Order. His church is the Meth- 
odist. In 1907 Mr. Pattee married Jessie M. Allman, member of a prom- 
inent family of Lake County. 

Maurice McKenzie. The official court reporter for the Lake County 
circuit court, Mr. McKenzie occupies one of the important positions 
among offices attached to this jurisdiction, and it is one requiring versa- 
tile and ready ability. Mr. McKenzie has held this office since 1902. 
He is an educated man, with a comprehensive knowledge of both law 
and business affairs. 

Maurice McKenzie was born in Zionville, Indiana, November 28, 1882, 
a son of William E. and Emma (Calvin) McKenzie, his father having 
been a minister of the Methodist Church. With a public school educa- 
tion, Mr. McKenzie entered the University of Valparaiso, and was grad- 
uated there in 1901. Having prepared himself for work as a stenog- 
rapher, he had considerable experience in private law offices, and in 
November, 1902, moved to Crown Point, and has since performed the 
duties of official reporter for the Lake County circuit. 

Mr. McKenzie was married October 8, 1904, to Ina Beattie of Lake 
County. Fraternally his affiliations are with the Masonic Order, the 
Gary Lodge of Elks and the Independent Order of Foresters. 

J. Will Belshaw. There are few citizens of Lake County better 
known than this Lowell lawyer, and none whose success has been attained 
as a result of more conscientious effort and concentrated purpose. As 
a lawyer his talent and hard-working ability have enabled him to serve 
the interests of many and important clients, and he has handled the legal 
affairs of a number of Lake County corporations. Prior to entering the 
law, he was a successful educator, and while schools have contributed 
to his education, he has gained most of his knowledge of the law through 
private industry. 

J. Will Belshaw was born on a farm near Lowell October 10, 1874. 
one of a family of three sons and two daughters born to AVilliam E. and 
Lucina Belshaw. Both his parents were natives of Lake County, and 
are still living there, the father at the age of sixty-six and the mother 
at sixty-two. 

After attending the country schools, J. Will Belshaw entered the 
Lowell High School, graduating in 1892. and in the following year 
finished a commercial course at Valparaiso University. The next seven 
years were spent chiefly in school work. He taught in the country, 
and for several years was assistant principal of the Lowell Schools. In 
the meantime his vacations and leisure time were spent in the study of 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 601 

law, and in 1895 came his admission to the bar. His work as a teacher 
went on, and at the same time he kept up his study of law, until June 

2, 1900. For about two years he was a partner of R. C. Wood before 
leaving his school work, and in 1900 he bought out Mr. Wood and began 
independent practice, with a library comprising only six volumes. At 
the present time Mr. Belshaw 's law office is one of the best equipped 
and has one of the finest libraries in Lake County. Mr. Belshaw also 
has the degree LL. B. from the Chicago Correspondence School of Law. 
His specialty as a lawyer has been corporation work, and he represents 
nearly all the large companies at Lowell and vicinity. For the past 
eight years he has served Lowell as town attornej^. 

On July 19, 1899, Miss Maud Hoshaw became his wife. Mrs. Bel- 
shaw is a graduate of the Lowell High School, and her diploma was 
signed by her husband as assistant principal, the year of her graduation 
being 1896. She is an active worker in the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
To their marriage have been born three children: Ernestine, who is 
fourteen years of age and in the high school, Marshall Elliott, aged 
nine, and Elwyn, aged seven, both of whom are attending school. Mr. 
Belshaw is affiliated with Colfax Lodge No. 387, A. F. & A. M., with 
the Knights of Pythias, the Modern Woodmen of America, the Inde- 
pendent Order of Foresters and the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, and has held several offices in these fraternities. A republican 
in politics, he has membership in the Hamilton Club of Chicago. 

J. W. Iddings, M. D. Now serving as president of the Lake County 
Medical Society, Doctor Iddings has well earned the distinction signi- 
fied by this official honor, and though engaged in practice at Lowell 
for only seven years, he brought to his work a thorough and extended 
preparation both in general medicine and some of its special branches, 
and in his profession has found his true vocation. 

Dr. J. W. Iddings was born at Swan, Noble County, Indiana, July 

3, 1879, a son of Dr. H. L. and Mary Iddings. His father has for 
many years been a physician and is now practicing at Merrillville in 
Lake County. He is sixty-two years of age and his wife is fifty-six. 

Dr. J. W. Iddings was educated in country schools, attended the 
high school and academy at Kendallville, prepared for work as a 
teacher in the Terre Haute Normal School. It is a matter of interest 
to note that during his three years as a teacher he taught in a little 
rural community known as Glen Park, now included within the limits 
of the great industrial City of Gary. After teaching Doctor Iddings 
spent a year and a half as clerk in the First National Bank of Chicago, 
and then took his medical course in the Northwestern University, grad- 
uating M. D. in 1906. His practical experience was increased by six 
months as assistant to the chief surgeon of the Chicago & Northwestern 
Railroad, and six months of special training in the Illinois Eye & Ear 
Infirmary. Since 1907 Doctor Iddings has been located at Lowell, and 
has a splendid practice in the town and vicinity. Besides his member- 
ship and official honor in the County Medical Society he is a member of 
the State and American Medical Associations, and is local surgeon for 
the Monon and the Chicago, Indiana & Southern Railways. 

In November, 1905, Doctor Iddings married Miss Myrtle Banks 
of Hobart, and she was educated in the Hobart High School. To their 
marriage have been born five children : Dorothy, Ruth. Jean, John and 
Janett, the oldest born in 1907 and the youngest in 1913. Doctor Iddings 



602 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

has fraternal relations with the Masonic and Knights of Pythias Order, 
is a republican in politics, and outside of his profession has performed 
public service as a member of the school board to which he was elected 
five years ago, and re-elected in 1913. His church is the Methodist. 

Paul I. Muschelewicz. One of the exceedingly capable young 
financiers and business men of the Calumet region is Paul I. Muschele- 
wicz, who is a son of Polish emigrants, began life without special advan- 
tages, but appears to have possessed a gift and talent for finance which, 
united with a thorough and tested integrity of character, has brought 
him when less than thirty years of age to positions of large responsi- 
bility in the community of Hammond. 

Paul I. Muschelewicz was born in German Poland February 12, 1886, 
and in 1891, when five years of age, his parents, John and Anna Muschele- 
wicz, emigrated to America and located in Chicago. It Avas in Chicago 
and in the parochial schools that Paul I. Muschelewicz acquired his early 
training, and after one year in a business college began an apprentice- 
ship in the machinist's trade. Mechanical pursuits were not his line, and 
after a brief experience he entered the employ of the First National Bank 
of East Chicago and spent five years with that concern, chiefly as book- 
keeper and teller. In 1910 he came to Hammond to assist in the organi- 
zation of the West Hammond Trust and Savings Bank, and was made 
cashier. Somewhat later followed his appointment as deputy United 
States collector of internal revenue. 

Mr. Muschelewicz in January, 1910, organized the First Polish 
National Building and Loan Association, and has served as its secretary 
since organization. This is an unusually strong and prosperous institu- 
tion, and in four years' time its deposits have grown to approximately 
one hundred and seventy thousand dollars. He is also secretary of the 
West Hammond Building and Loan Association, which was organized 
in January, 1911, and has resources of $70,000. 

Mr. Muschelewicz was married in West Hammond on September 29, 
1909, to Anna Pietras. Their three children are Paul I., Michael J., and 
Hedwig. Mr. Muschelewicz and family worship in the St. Andrew 
Catholic Church in West Hammond, and he is affiliated with the Catholic 
Order of Foresters and the Knights of Columbus and the Polish National 
Alliance. 

Frank L. Hunt. As a Lowell druggist Frank L. Hunt has been 
in business for the past twelve years, and in that progressive community 
has displayed his public spirit in civic affairs, and has been a highly 
esteemed associate of the other business men and citizens in that 
community. 

Frank L. Hunt was born in Bartholomew County, Indiana, April 
21, ]861. His education came from the public schools, and at the age 
of eighteen he entered the Terre Haute Normal School to prepare him- 
self for teaching. That was his regular vocation for nine years, much 
of the time in country schools, but he was also for three years in the town 
schools of Medaryvilie. From teaching Mr. Hunt entered the telegraph 
office at North Judson in the employ of the Chicago & Erie Company. 
Employment for a brother in the drug business at Medaryvilie gave 
him his permanent vocation. Subsequently he moved to Flora, Indiana, 
engaged in the drug business for himself for ten years, finally sold that 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 603 

store and bought another at Rensselaer, was there one year, sold out 
and took charge of his brother's store at Knox and looked after the 
business for a year until the settlement of the estate was completed. 
On January 1, 1902, Mr. Hunt identified himself with Lowell, and has 
since built up a thriving business in that city. He has a store 21x80 
feet, and besides a complete line of drugs carries paints, wall paper, 
books and general sundries usually found in a store of that kind. 

At Medaryville, Indiana, October 20, 1899, was celebrated the mar- 
riage of Mr. Hunt to Miss Ida Evert. She grew up and was educated 
at Medaryville. Mr. Hunt is a member of the Masonic Order, is a 
democrat in politics, and his wife is secretary of the Board of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church. He has always been interested in athletic sports, 
is enthusiastic over both baseball and football, and some years ago 
was instrumental in organizing the old Lowell football team, which was 
one of the most successful independent teams in this section of the 
country, and its record is still recalled with pleasure by the local fol- 
lowers of the sport. 

P. L. RiGG, D. D. S. Prominent among the dental practitioners of 
Lake County who have won precedence in their profession through the 
possession of superior skill and thorough training, is found Doctor P. 
L. Rigg, who has been engaged successfully in practice at Lowell since 
1900. It may be said that dentistry is unique among all other voca- 
tions, as it is at once a profession, a trade and a business. Thus it 
follows that to attain a full measure of success the practitioner must 
be thoroughly familiar with the theory of the calling, expert in the use 
of the many appliances and accessories incidental to the practice of 
modern dentistry and possessed of business qualifications which will 
enable him to deal with the financial side of the profession. In none 
of these essentials is Doctor Rigg lacking, and the extent and represen- 
tative nature of his practice evidences the fact that the people of Lowell 
have recognized his general Avorth in his chosen line of endeavor. 

Doctor Rigg is a native of the Hoosier State, born in the City of 
Valparaiso, in February, 1877. His early education was secured in the 
public schools of that city, and after completing a course in pharmacy 
at Valparaiso University, in 1897, practiced that calling for one year. 
Following this he entered the Chicago Dental School, where he was 
graduated in 1900, and in June of that year came to Lowell and opened 
offices, which are well equipped with the latest improved instruments 
and appliances. He has been a constant student, keeping himself fully 
abreast of the many advancements which have been made in dentistry 
in recent years, and his pronounced ability has gained him an excellent 
reputation among his fellow practitioners. He holds membership in the 
various organizations of his calling, and fraternizes with Colfax Lodge 
of Masons and the Knights of Pythias. His recreation is taken in out- 
door sports and he has some local reputation as a hunter. 

On April 6, 1902, Doctor Rigg was united in marriage with Miss 
Maud Esther Hill, of LoAvell, she being a native of this city and a grad- 
uate of its public schools. Four bright and interesting children have 
been born to this union : Harry, who is eleven years old ; Custis, aged 
nine years; Mary Alice, who is four; and Marjorie, the baby, aged one 
year. Doctor and Mrs. Rigg enjoy a wide acquaintance and are general 
favorites in social circles of the city. 



604 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

F. E. Nelson. A successful career has been that of P. E. Nelson, 
now living retired at Lowell. Many things constitute success, and it 
is not alone in his material possessions that the success of Mr. Nelson 
is measured. He represents an old settled family of Lake County, was 
during his early years a teacher in public schools, and has given full 
service in every capacity that the destiny of life has placed him, has 
discharged the obligations of citizenship, and dealt squarely with all 
men, so there are none to begrudge him his prosperity. Mr. Nelson has 
a position as one of the successful farmers of the county, but is per- 
haps best known in business as a banker, though now retired from active 
work in that line. 

F. E. Nelson was born in West Creek Township of Lake County, 
February 4, 1855. His parents were Truman and Sena (French) Nel- 
son. His father was born in New York State, in 1823, came to Lake 
County in 1850 and died here in 1856. His wife was born in Ohio in 
1826, and died in Lake County in 1879. 

F. E. Nelson, the sixth among a family of seven children, was reared 
in West Creek Township, attended the local schools until seventeen, and 
then took the teacher's course in the Valparaiso Normal for two years. 
At the age of eighteen he was qualified for his first work as a teacher, 
and taught in the country districts of Lake County and also in Illinois 
until twenty-five years of age. During 1879-80 he was principal of the 
Lowell High School. Then followed eleven years as an active and pro- 
gressive farmer, beginning with the purchase of eighty-two acres of 
land in West Creek Township, and his acreage was increased from time 
to time until he was the owner of 320 acres and still owns that fine 
estate, in splendid condition of improvement and cultivation, and rents 
it. In February, 1893, Mr. Nelson moved to Lowell and. became one of 
the original incorporators of the State Bank of Lowell, and served as 
its cashier until 1900. The bank then took out a national charter and 
was conducted as the State National Bank of Lowell. Mr. Nelson con- 
tinued as its cashier until 1903, when he resigned, and was one of the 
group of local financiers who in May of that year organized the Low- 
ell National Bank, of which Mr. Nelson was chosen president. In 
1907 he resigned from the bank in order to accompany his son Ray- 
mond, whose health was seriously impaired, to Texas in hope of recupera- 
tion. The son died there in October of the same year, and Mr. Nelson 
remained in the Lone Star State for two years, and since returning to 
Lowell has been retired from active business. He now has one of the 
most comfortable homes of Lowell, a two-story brick residence, with all 
the conveniences. 

On September 9, 1879, Mr. Nelson married Emeline Foster, daugh- 
ter of Lyman and Lucy Foster, early settlers in West Creek Township, 
where Mrs. Nelson was born and reared. The children of their mar- 
riage were named Raymond L., Bernice S.. Ned E., Julia F., Emily and 
Marian. The daughter Bernice is the wife of L. M. Grant, of Seattle, 
Washington. Ned E. was educated at Purdue University, finishing a 
course as mining engineer at Columbia University in New York, and is 
now following his profession as mining engineer in British Columbia. 
The daughter Julia is now attending an art school in Chicago. Emily 
is attending the University of Wisconsin and Marian is in school at 
Lowell. Mr. Nelson is one of the stanch republicans of Lake County, 
served five years as trustee of his township, and fraternally is affiliated 
with Colfax Lodge. A. F. & A. M., with Lowell Lodge No. 300 Knights 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 605 

of Pythias, and for recreation spends much of his time out of doors and 
enjoys fishing and boating. 

Peter A. Berg. During most of his boyhood and early youth and 
in his mature business career the people of Lowell have known Peter 
A. Berg and have always been more than willing to place their con- 
fidence in his integrity and ability. After considerable experience in 
merchandising, Mr. Berg engaged in banking, and was one of the 
organizers and is now cashier of the Lowell National Bank. Mr. Berg 
is regarded as one of the leading business men in his section of Lake 
County. 

Peter A. Berg was born at Dyer, Indiana, February 14, 187o, but 
in the next year his parents moved to Goodenow, Will County, Illinois. 
His first schooling was obtained at Goodenow. but in 1885 the family 
moved to Lowell and his education was completed there up to the age 
of fourteen and later was supplemented with six -months study in the 
Metropolitan Business College of Chicago. Mr. Berg remained in Chi- 
cago several years working with different business concerns, and then 
returned to Lowell and engaged in the hardware business up to 1895. 
Since then his career has been identified with banking. He was assistant 
cashier of the State Bank of Lowell until 1903, and in that year assisted 
in organizing the Lowell National Bank, and has since had an important 
share in its successful growth and has held the position of cashier. The 
Lowell National Bank was at first capitalized at $25,000, but in 1910 
the capital was increased to $50,000. At the present time the surplus 
amounts to $12,000.00. The bank has its own building, and its stock- 
holders number about forty-five citizens, most of them residents of 
Lowell or vicinity. George B. Bailey is president ; Charles E. Nichols 
is vice president: P. A. Berg, cashier; and George L. Foster, assistant 
cashier. 

Mr. Berg was married at Hanover Center, November 22, 1898, to 
Susan Heiser, who grew up in that community and was educated in 
the common schools. Mr. and Mrs. Berg are the parents of one son 
and four daughters, Ruth. Harold, Dorothy, Virginia and Katherine. 
The oldest being fourteen and the youngest about two years of age. 
The four oldest children are now in school. Mrs. Berg has devoted her 
married life to the interests of her home and children, and is an active 
member of the Catholic Church. Mr. Berg served three years as town 
clerk at Lowell, having been appointed to the office in 1897, and then 
elected. At the same time he served as town treasurer. During his 
official service he was one of the foremost advocates of waterworks, and 
did much to secure that important improvement. Politically he stands 
as a progressive. 

George L. Foster. Assistant cashier of the Lowell National Bank, 
George L. Foster has been identified with this thriving town of North- 
ern Indiana for the past seven years, but also professes a loyalty to the 
community as his birthplace. Mr. Foster is a successful young business 
man, and has also played a useful part in local affairs and is now serv- 
ing his second term as city clerk. 

George L. Foster was born at Lowell, August 26, 1882, a son of 
Edson and Alma Foster, both living on their farm in Lake County, the 
father at the age of sixty and the mother at fifty-five. There is one 
other child, Harry, aged twenty-seven and a farmer. 



606 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

George L. Foster lived in Lowell until thirteen, began his education 
there, and when the family moved to Chicago Heights he was a student 
in the high school for three years. His first practical experience was 
as an assistant in the postoffice at Chicago Heights, but for six years 
he was with the American Brake Shoe & Foundry Company, and for a 
time represented that industry in the East at Suffern, New York. In 
1908 Mr. Foster established his home at Lowell, and has since then been 
assistant cashier of the Lowell National Bank. In 1911 came his first 
election to the office of city clerk, and by re-election in 1913 he is still 
serving. Mr. Foster is one of those public-spirited men who foresee con- 
tinued advancement and prosperity for Lowell, particularly as a resi- 
dence city. He believes in progressive movements for betterment and 
improvements, and is one of the advocates of the movement now under 
way for the paving of Main Street. Since he became clerk another 
improvement was the continuous light system for the city lighting plant, 
and a number of paved cement walks have been put down. Mr. Foster 
is a Methodist, a progressive in politics, and has held some of the chairs 
in Colfax Lodge No. 378, A. F. & A. M. In June, 1909, he married 
Lena Hayward, of Chicago Heights. Mrs. Foster was reai'ed and edu- 
cated in Des Moines, Iowa. 

William Pepperdine. One of the most prominent business men of 
Hammond is AVilliam Pepperdine, whose interests have been identified 
with that city since 1890. As a contractor and builder it is only necessary 
to refer to a few of the contracts which he has successfully executed to 
determine his standing as one of the leading men in his line in the Calu- 
met district. In Hammond the Franklin, the Lafayette, the Sobiesky, 
the German Lutheran schools are all examples of his work as a builder, 
besides the Baptist Church, and the hundreds of homes and minor busi- 
ness stores and shops, etc. He also had the contract for the erection of 
the First National Bank of East Chicago. Mr. Pepperdine is a clear- 
headed business man. and, coming to America some forty years ago, has 
won his success through his own unaided efforts. Capital was less 
important with him than hard work and close application to business, 
and he has also performed much important service to his community as 
a citizen. His business is now carried on under the name of William 
Pepperdine & Son. his son Francis Albert being associated with him as 
junior member. Mr. Pepperdine under appointment from Governor 
Durbin served as police commissioner of Hammond. 

Born in Lincolnshire, England, March 25, 1852, William Pepperdine 
was educated in the national schools, served an apprenticeship as a brick- 
layer in his native land, and in 1870, at the age of eighteen, came to 
America and first located at Milford, Illinois. During the following 
years he did a great amount of building and carpentry work in Indiana 
towns, and when he came to Hammond it was with a splendid equipment 
of experience and proved ability in his line. 

In 1873 Mr. Pepperdine married Elizabeth McKnight. They are the 
parents of two children : John AVilliam, who served as assistant post- 
master at Hammond under three different postmasters and superin- 
tended the installation of the free delivery system in that city, and is 
now a resident of Omaha, Nebraska ; Francis A. is the junior member of 
Pepperdine & Son. The father has active membership in the Commercial 
Club of Hammond and of Indiana Harbor, and is a member of the 
Hammond Country Club, is affiliated with the Masonic lodge, the Inde- 





s£^^z> t/^^^^e^^/ 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 607 

pendent Order of Odd Fellows and the benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, and is a vestryman in St. Paul's Episcopal Church. 

John William Pepperdine, the oldest son, was born September 28, 
1874, while Francis Albert was born at Milford, Illinois, December 14, 
1876. Both had the advantages of the public schools, and while John 
interested himself in public lines of work, Francis grew up under his 
father's instruction as a mason and contractor. Francis was married 
October 7. 1899, to Florence Norvada Marshall of Hammond. Their 
three children are Frances M., Beatrice, and Geneva Marshall. Mr. F. A. 
Pepperdine is a member of the St. Paul's Episcopal Church. 

John W. Pepperdine was married December 14, 1898, to Grace B. 
Powell. Their three living children are Lyman, Harry and Margaret. 
They lost a daughter Dorothy on May 31, 1900. 

J. M. Castle. For more than sixty years a resident of Lake County, 
Mr. Castle is one of the citizens whose name and a -brief record of whose 
career should be permanently recorded in any history of the community. 
He represents a family which has had its part in the early development 
of the county, was himself one of Lake County's soldiers for the war 
of the Rebellion, and since his return to the county as a veteran soldier 
has had his full share in the responsibilities of making a living and 
providing for home and family and has also discharged his duties to the 
general community with an efficiency which brings him honor. 

J. M. Castle was born in Huron County, Ohio, August 25, 1841. 
His father, Squire Castle was a native of Fairfield, Vermont, and his 
mother, Almeda (Hudson) Castle, was a native of Braintree, Vermont, 
and were married at Burlington, that state, m 1837. They were early 
settlers in Ohio, moved to Michigan in 1850, and in 1852 arrived in West 
Creek Township of Lake County. J. M. Castle was then about twelve 
years of age, and continued his education in the local schools until 
fifteen. His place was on the home farm until 1863, in which year he 
enlisted in the Union army, going out with Company E of the Twenty- 
Eighth Indiana Infantry. His service was a notable one, being with 
the splendid army under the command of Sherman during the battle of 
Missionary Ridge, the battles leading up to the siege and capture of 
Atlanta, after which he was sent with the troops under Schofield and 
Thomas into Tennessee to meet Hood, and participated at Franklin and 
Nashville ; from Clifton, Tennessee, he went into Virginia, on to Wash- 
ington, and by boat to Wilmington, North Carolina, and was in Cox '9 
Division at the time of the capture of that Confederate stronghold. He 
finally reached Newbern and was in the battle of Wise's Fork, North 
Carolina, and joined the army of Sherman at Goldsboro. He was 
with the army at Raleigh and remained in the Carolinas until the sur- 
render of Johnston, then went to Charlotte, to Salisbury, and to Raleigh, 
and in 1866 left Raleigh and was finally discharged at Indianapolis. 
With this record as a soldier he returned to Lake County, spent a year 
in the railroad service at Valparaiso, was for two years in the employ 
of the Union Pacific in the West, and since 1869 his home has been 
permanently in Lake County. After his marriage he located on a rented 
farm, and as a result of many years of activity in farms and in mer- 
chandising has acquired a substantial position in the community of 
Lowell. 

On December 15, 1869, Mr. Castle married Sarah A. Zinn, of La 
Porte County, Indiana. Their oldest child is Genevieve, the wife of 



608 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

Levi Wood, of Lowell ; Gwendolyn, aged twenty-nine, is with her father 
in the store at Lowell, and Gwyneth is the wife of Ed Browell, of 
Lowell. 

Mr. Castle during Cleveland's administration served as postmaster 
at Lowell, and has always given his allegiance to the democratic party. 
He is affiliated with the Masonic Order. Mr. Castle has a mercantile 
establishment that has long been a conspicuous center in the business 
district, and is also the owner of 304 acres of land, besides having given 
120 acres to bis children. Mr. Castle has served as postmaster at Lowell 
and his brother Mortimer is now the incumbent of that office, a very 
unusual occurrence, and on August 15, 1914. he had two threshing out- 
fits at work on his land, another happening that rarely occurs. 

Thaddeus S. Fancher. This is a name which through two genera- 
tions has become one of the most familiar in Lake County, and has been 
dignified by splendid service in the law and also in the practical con- 
structive work which has extended the area of cultivated land over a 
district formerly known only as a marsh and practically valueless. 
The present bearer of the title Thaddeus S. Fancher is a young Crown 
Point lawyer, and a son of Thaddeus S. Fancher, Sr., who practiced 
law in the county seat of Lake County for over forty years and by per- 
sonality, individual attainments in his profession, and by his varied 
service to the public, left one of the most honorable names in the 
annals of Northern Indiana. 

Thaddeus S. Fancher. Sr., who died at Crown Point February 11, 
1912, was born in Huron County, Ohio, August 31, 1845. Both his 
father and his grandfather before him had the Christian name Thad- 
deus S. The first Thaddeus S. was of French descent, a native of Con- 
necticut, and a pioneer in Huron County, Ohio. His son Thaddeus S. 
the second, was born in Huron County in 1809, and spent all his life on 
one farm in that county, dying at the age of eighty-four. His wife, 
whose maiden name was Amy Chapman, lived to the venerable age of 
eighty-seven years. 

The late Thaddeus S. Fancher, who was the seventh among ten 
children, was reared in Huron County, and attended one of the pioneer 
schoolhouses so celebrated in American history. He then taught school 
to pay his expenses while attending Oberlin College, and in 1868 arrived 
at Crown Point, where two years were spent alternately in the study of 
law with Major Griffin and in teaching school. Mr. Fancher entered 
the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, in 1870, graduating in the 
law department in 1871, and having already been admitted to the bar 
at Crown Point in 1870, at once took up practice there. It is said that 
when he first offered his services to the community as a lawyer his cash 
capital amounted to eighty cents. He Avas soon given business, and few 
members of the bar practiced with steadier or more substantial success. 
In 1873 he was elected county superintendent of schools for two years, 
and though re-elected resigned to resume his law practice. For four 
years he served as prosecuting attorney and in 1879 was elected on the 
republican ticket to the state legislature, and his re-election in 1881 
came by the largest majority ever given any candidate in the county up 
to that' time. During his service at Indianapolis he served on the revi- 
sion committee that revised the Indiana statutes, and was also instru- 
mental in passing the first practical drainage and reclamation law. 
that instituted the extensive work that has since converted Northwestern 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 609 

Indiana from a wilderness of marsh into some of the finest agricultural 
land in the state. 

From 1881 Mr. Fancher divided his time between a large general 
practice and his interests as a land owner and in behalf of the movement 
for reclamation and drainage in the Calumet district. He was the lawyer 
who solved most of the legal problems involved in the construction of 
over a hundred and fifty miles of ditches, and was one of the men most 
instrumental in constructing the pioneer ditch in 1885, known as the 
Singleton ditch, in the Kankakee marsh, a ditch seventeen miles long and 
costing $17,000, and which inaugurated the era which in the subsequent 
twenty years has made many thousands of acres available for all the 
staple crops of this section. 

The late Mr. Fancher was affiliated with the Masonic Order and the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. On September 27, 1871, at Green- 
wich, Ohio, he married Miss Ardelle Washburn, daughter of Charles A. 
and Marietta (Griffin) Washburn. Thaddeus S. Fancher, Jr., is the 
only living child of that marriage. The deceased children are : Walter, 
who died, aged one year and three months; Charles H., at the age of 
ten years ; Frank O., at the age of four years and ten months ; and 
Edith L., when eight years and three months. 

Thaddeus S. Fancher, Jr., was born at Crown Point, December 7. 
1888. His education in the public schools was followed by a course of 
three years in Valparaiso University until graduating in 1911, and in 
the meantime in 1907 he had pursued a course at the Kent College of 
Law in Chicago. Since then he has been engaged in a general practice 
at Crown Point and is now adding to the reputation so long asso- 
ciated with this name in the Lake County bar. Mr. Fancher is a mem- 
ber of the Lake County Bar Association. 

John H. Fetterhoff. During five years of active practice at Whit- 
ing, Mr. Fetterhoff 's name has become well known and prominent in 
legal circles, he has gained a position which is the ambition of every 
lawyer, and has also taken much part in public affairs. 

John H. Fetterhoff was born in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, in 1880, 
a son of substantial farming people, P. W. and Kathryne Fetterhoff. 
As a boy he had to depend largely upon his own exertions and his own 
plans for the future, and after a training in the public schools, attended 
for several terms the Elizabethville Seminary, and helped to pay his 
way by two years of teaching. His early business career was chiefly 
as a banker, and for five years he was assistant cashier of Halifax 
National Bank in Pennsylvania, and although that was his official title, 
he was practically the executive manager of the institution for about, 
three years. In the fall of 1906 Mr. Fetterhoff came West and entered 
the law department of Valparaiso University and remained a student 
there until his graduation LL. B. in 1908. Since May 1, 1909, he has 
practiced in Whiting, and in March, 1913, took in as a partner Roy E. 
Green. He handles a large amount of general legal business, and is 
also advisory counsel to the Whiting Board of Education and is deputy 
prosecuting attorney and city attorney. 

Mr. Fetterhoff is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, the Lodge and Royal Arch Chapter of Masonry, the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks, the Owl Club, the Chicago Progressive 
Club and the Slovak Political Club of Hammond. In politics he is 
a progressive. 



610 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

L. H. Mattern. From the standpoint of years of continuous activ- 
ity, L. H. Mattern is now the oldest merchant at AVhiting. His store 
and his mercantile service, have been familiar to the people of that 
community for more than twenty years, and he is also one of the most 
honored citizens of the community. 

L. H. Mattern was born in Huntington County, Pennsylvania, Sep- 
tember 27, 1841, a son of Andrew and Sophia Mattern. His father was 
a wagon maker, and in the spring of 1866 moved out to Indiana and 
located in Huntington County, where he bought a farm and followed 
agriculture until his retirement. His death occurred at the good old 
age of ninety-six May 3, 1909, and his wife passed away in December, 
1909, aged ninety-four. Both were active members of the Presbyterian 
Church. 

L. H. Mattern attended the, public schools of his native county in 
Pennsylvania, and also the Juniata Collegiate Institute. At the age 
of twenty he got his first experience in the drug trade, and after coming 
to Indiana worked in a general store at Huntington, and then returned 
to Pennsylvania and conducted a general store four years. Selling 
out his business in that state Mr. Mattern on February 1, 1892, estab- 
lished a drug store at Whiting, and has been continuously in that 
line of trade to the present time. His first stock of goods were in the 
Porter Block, later in the Smith & Bader Building, and in 1911 he 
located in the new Schrage Bank Building. 

Mr. Mattern was married in 1867 to Sallie Martin of Pennsylvania. 
She died in 1887. She was the mother of two children, Carrie, who 
died at the age of twenty-two years and Lillian, now living in Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. Mr. Mattern. in 3893, married Ada C. Brown, of 
Minneapolis. Her death occurred January 28, 1912, and she left one 
daughter, Louise H., who now lives with her father. Air. Alattern has 
affiliations with the Masonic Order, is a charter member of the Owl 
Club, which was started in 1894. and attends the Congregational Church. 
A republican in politics, he gave service for ten years on the township 
advisory board. 

Frank N. Gavit. One of the best known and most successful law- 
yers of Lake County is Frank N. Gavit, of AVhiting. He is not only 
an able lawyer, but has taken an active part in state politics and has 
won a reputation for his fidelity to his ideals and to the trusts which 
the people of the state and community have reposed in him. He is the 
type of citizen who began life without special advantages, except such 
as he secured by his own efforts, and rose from a place among the 
multitude to afront rank in his learned profession. 

Frank N. Gavit was born in Walsingham, Ontario, April 24, 1864, 
son of Albert and Bridget Gavit. His father was a farmer, and in 
1872 moved to Poutiac, Michigan, and in 1877 to Saginaw, which city 
has been his home ever since. 

Frank N. Gavit got his preparation for life as a public school student 
and in energetic work on the farm and whatever labors devolved upon 
his youthful energies. He subsequently graduated from Valparaiso 
University, and took his law course in the Northwestern University at 
Chicago, which graduated him LL. B. in 1890. After two and a half 
years practice at Saginaw Air. Gavit moved to AVhiting in 1892. and is 
now one of the oldest members of the bar in that city. His public service 
has been through the offices of district prosecuting attorney, city attor- 







( g^Sa&^aa 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 611 

ney, and in 1910 came his election as a member" of the Indiana State 
Senate for four years, and at the present time he is candidate for re-elec- 
tion to that office. As city attorney Mr. Gavit has the distinction of 
having drawn up the charter of incorporation of Whiting as a town 
and also as a city, and throughout the years he has been called upon 
again and again for important legal advice and counsel in municipl 
matters. 

Mr. Gavit was married in 1893 to Minnie V. Tweedy, of Saginaw. 
Their two children are Albert and Ruth Eleanor, both at home. Mr. 
Gavit has attained the thirty-second degree in Scottish Rite Masonry, is 
a Knight Templar and a Shriner, belongs to the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, the Knights of Pythias, the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, was a charter member of the Owl Club when it was 
established about twenty years ago, is a member of the Hamilton Club 
of Chicago, the Chicago Automobile Club, the Hammond Country Club, 
and in politics is progressive. Mr. Gavit has been honored with the 
office of president of the Whiting Commercial Club since its organization 
in 1900. Outside of his profession he is president of the G. & I. Rail- 
way and president of the Petroleum Company. 

William Daniel Weis, B. S., M. D. Many of the leaders in the 
medical profession today are devoting themselves in a large measure to 
the prevention of disease, as well as to its cure. In this way their effi- 
ciency as benefactors has extended much beyond the scope of the old 
fashioned practice when the doctor was related to his patients only as 
an individual. In the Calumet district one of the real leaders in the 
public health movement, and also a man of the highest standing and 
prestige as a physician and surgeon, is Dr. W. D. Weis. He comes of a 
family that has been identified with Lake County for sixty years, and both 
his father and grandfather helped to develop the community from pioneer 
times and were men of standing in their respective communities. 

William Daniel Weis was born at Hanover Center, in Lake County, 
November 28. 1873. His parents are Jacob A. and Julia A. (Long) Weis, 
the former a native of Germany and the latter of Buffalo, New York. 
Jacob A. Weis, who was born in Bavaria, Germany, in 1841, a son of 
John and Catherine Weis, accompanied his parents to America in 1847. 
John Weis. Sr., after serving for several years as a farmer in the vicinity 
of Joliet, Illinois, in 1853. settled in St. John Township, Lake County, 
buying a farm on which Jacob A. Weis was reared. Early in his career 
Jacob A. Weis learned the trade of blacksmith, and about 1864 became 
the village blacksmith at Merrillville, in this county. Two years later 
he moved to Hanover Center, where as an inducement the villagers had 
built and presented to him a shop and home. His services here extended 
over a period of ten years, when he moved into Jasper County, where he 
bought a farm and engaged in the live-stock raising business, and also 
operated a sawmill for two years. In 1876 Jacob A. Weis moved with 
his family to Crown Point, where he resumed his trade as blacksmith 
for nine years, after Avhich he began to take contracts for house moving 
and construction of foundations, which business he followed until his 
retirement. In 1892 he moved to Hammond, where he now resides. In 
1865 Jacob A. AYeis married Julia A. Long, a native of Erie County, 
New York, residing at that time in St. John Township, Lake County. 
They have nine children living, as follows : Mary M., Mrs. J. D. Arnold, 
of Hammond; Joseph W., of Hammond ; Frances A., Mrs. Frank Prairie, 



612 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

of Chicago; Dr. William D. ; Rose E., wife of Joseph Emmerling, of 
Hammond; Theresa C, Mrs. Peter Young, of Hammond; Harry L., of 
Hammond; Carl E., of Hammond; and Julia C, of Hammond. The 
family are members of St. Joseph's Church of Hammond. 

Doctor Weis was reared during the greater part of his developing 
period at Crown Point. He attended parochial school, the Crown Point 
high school, was captain of the High School Cadets, and for two years 
taught school in Hanover Township. In 1896 he entered Valparaiso 
University as a student, completing the Scientific and the Civil En- 
gineering courses and was subsequently connected with the faculty of 
instruction as assistant professor of Biology and Natural Sciences in 
that institution for six years. Resigning that position he became the 
Registrar for the Chicago College for Nurses, at the same time being 
appointed professor of Histology and Bacteriology in the American 
College of Medicine and Surgery, which position he held until coming to 
Hammond in 1904. After graduation in medicine. Doctor Weis spent six 
months as House Physician in St. Margaret's Hospital. He is licensed 
by examination to practice medicine in Indiana and Illinois and has 
enjoyed a large general practice at Hammond and vicinity ever since 
opening up his office in 1904. Banking and real estate and the organized 
professional societies and public health movements have enlisted his 
services and influence, and he is through his varied relations one of the 
most prominent men of Hammond. Mayor Becker in 1908 appointed 
him Health Commissioner of Hammond, and by re-appointment from 
Mayor Smalley he is now serving his seventh consecutive year in that 
office. In 1912 he was made president of the Lake Michigan Sanitary 
Association, an important organization embracing the health officers of 
Michigan, Indiana, AVisconsin and Illinois, and working as an organiza- 
tion for the raising of the standards of sanitation and community health 
in the district about Lake Michigan. He was president of the Lake 
County Medical Society during 1913, and has membership in the Indiana 
and American Medical Associations. As a business man he is vice presi- 
dent and one of the organizers of the Citizens German National Bank of 
Hammond, was one of the organizers and is a director of the West 
Hammond Trust & Savings Bank, is a director and chairman of the 
committee on health and sanitation in the Chamber of Commerce, is a 
member and was one of the original thirty who bought the land and 
organized the Hammond Country Club. Fraternally he is a member of 
the Modern Woodmen of America, the Catholic Order of Foresters and 
the Knights of Columbus. 

On January 31, 1908, Doctor Weis married Jessie C. Fish, of Frank- 
fort, Michigan. Their two adopted sons, Edward and Robert, share their 
attractive country home in the center of a beautiful twenty acre tract of 
land located on the outskirts of the city, on the Indiana-Illinois State 
Line. 

Bank of Whiting. The first, banking institution in Whiting, and 
now an institution with resources and responsibility of over a million 
dollars, the Bank of Whiting was established as a private bank in April, 
1895, by the venerable Henry Schrage, who is now president of the 
bank and also has the distinction of being the oldest resident of Whiting. 
The first location of the bank was at 119th Street, 200 feet from the 
corner of Front Street. In 1911 the bank was moved to its present site 
at the corner of New York Avenue and 119th Street, and was housed in 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 613 

a new building erected especially for the bank, with offices overhead. 
The officers of the Bank of Whiting are Henry Schrage, president; 
H. C. Schrage, vice president; W. E. Schrage, cashier; and W. C. 
Schrage, assistant cashier. The Bank of Whiting is now operated under- 
state supervision, with a capital of $50,000 and a surplus of $35,000. 
Its total resources in March, 1914, were reported as nearly nine hundred 
thousand dollars, and the deposits totaled almost eight hundred thou- 
sand dollars. 

W. E. Schrage, cashier of this splendid institution, was born in 
Whiting, December 31, 1884, and is one of the sons of Mr. Henry 
Schrage, whose career as a Whiting pioneer is sketched elsewhere. His 
education came through the public schools and from the University 
of Wisconsin, and since beginning life for himself he has been identified 
with the bank of his father. 

Mr. Schrage was married February 20, 1909, to Lois Coffin, of 
Crown Point. Their three children are Genevieve, Virginia and Walter 
M. Mr. Schrage affiliates with the Fraternal Order of Eagles, the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Knights of Pythias and 
the Masonic Lodge, is exalted ruler of the Elks Lodge No. 1273, has 
passed the chairs in the Eagles and the Knights of Pythias, and in 
politics is a republican. His first public service was on the school 
board, beginning at the age of twenty-two and continuing for three 
years. He was a member of the board at the time the new high school 
building was erected. In November, 1913, Mr. Schrage was elected 
mayor of Whiting on the citizens ticket and began his official duties on 
January 5, 1914. He is treasurer of the Whiting Pure Ice Company. 
Other social connections are with the Owl Club of Whiting and the Ham- 
ilton Club of Chicago. 

Henry Schrage. Every one in Whiting knows Henry Schrage not 
only as president of the Bank of Whiting, one of the largest and most 
substantial financial institutions in the Calumet region, but also as the 
oldest citizen of that industrial and population center. Henry Schrage 
has had a notable career, .has been a soldier, merchant, banker, official, 
and in the early days knew what hard work meant, and through all his 
relations has maintained that strict integrity which is the basis of his 
prominence in affairs. 

Henry Schrage is a native of Germany, born at Ambrodenberg, 
January 21, 1844. His parents, Christof and Frederica Schrage, brought 
him to Lake County in October, 1854. They settled at what is now 
the City of Whiting, and his father owned fifty acres now covered by 
the great plant of the Standard Oil Company. Later the family moved 
to Chicago and the father was a. merchant there. There were two chil- 
dren, and Henry Schrage 's sister Dorothy is the wife of Chris Harnes, 
of Whiting. 

Henry Schrage had a liberal training in hard work and some instruc- 
tion in the schools as preparation for life. When a youth in 1863 he 
enlisted in Company K of the Thirty-first Illinois Regiment, and then 
went South to battle for the union. He participated in the battles of 
Chattanooga and Lookout Mountain and other engagements leading up 
to the fall at Atlanta, and afterwards accompanied Sherman's army 
on its march to the sea. He was mustered out in 1865 at Louisville, 
Kentucky, and after the war earned his livelihood by work on a farm 
and on the railway. His home during these years was at that point 



614 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

in Lake County now covered by the City of Whiting, and in 1868 he 
opened a country store along the railroad, which had the distinction of 
being the first trading place in the now populous City of Whiting. While 
he continued his labors with the railway, his wife conducted the store 
and sold goods in limited quantities to the people of that locality. 
Later when the postoffice was established he was appointed postmaster 
and his store grew with the expanding town, and was a profitable enter- 
prise until he sold out in 1895. On retiring from the store, he estab- 
lished the bank in Whiting, and is now the honored president of that 
institution and the oldest of a group of capitalists who have been promi- 
nent for years in financial and industrial affairs. Henry Schrage also 
established a bank at East Chicago, and is still president of the State 
Bank there. 

On June 6, 1868, Henry Schrage married Carolina Wistenfeldt, a 
native of Germany. To their marriage were born seven sons and two 
daughters, three of whom are deceased, and while the daughters are 
married the sons are all officials in the Bank of Whiting. 

Mr. Schrage is a member of the Lutheran Church, is a republican in 
politics, served six years as a township trustee, and was a member of 
the council from the incorporation of Whiting up to 1910. 

Fred J. Smith. During the rise of Whiting from a town of one 
industry to a city of multiplied interests and population, no one individ- 
ual has kept closer faith with the development of his community and has 
been a larger and more successful factor in its affairs than Fred J. 
Smith, the mere mention of whose name calls up half a dozen or more 
large companies, banks and industrial concerns in which he is a chief 
factor. 

His enterprise has been longest identified with what is known as the 
Smith, Bacler & Davidson Company, which began as a real estate office, 
operating on a small scale in 1890 under the firm title of Smith & Bader. 
In 1908 Mr. C. D. Davidson was included in the firm. The company 
was incorporated as the Smith & Bader Companv in 1907, and the capital 
stock was increased from $25,000 to $35,000 in 1909, and in 1913, to 
$100,000. This is the largest real estate and insurance concern in 
Whiting, with ample resources, with several of the leading business 
men of Lake County directing its operations, and they are giving par- 
ticular attention to the development of high-class residence sections, 
putting on the market tracts of city land and building for purchasers 
a large number of fine dwellings. The company has an office and does 
a large business in Gary. Among the most important transactions of 
the firm in Whiting has been the development of Sheridan Park, com- 
prising seventy-seven lots, and Central Park, 360 lots. At Indiana 
Harbor they developed Washington Park, 600 lots, and are now putting 
on the market South Park in Whiting. These parks have all been high 
grade residence districts, with restricted conditions as to cost and quality 
of improvements. It is the oldest firm operating in real estate in 
Whiting, with a successful record of twenty-three years. 

Fred J. Smith is president of the company, Gallus J. Bader, long his 
business associate, is vice president, C. D. Davidson is secretary, and 
James A. Gill is treasurer. The company's offices are located at 501 
119th Street. Other directors are Frank N. Gavit, Paul A. Scholz, Julius 
Szudinski and John Schaub. 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 615 

Fred J. Smith was not introduced to a business career by a wealthy 
father or through influential friends, but has carved out his destiny 
for himself. Born at LaPorte, Indiana, in 1862, a son of Louis and 
Sophia Smith, his father a tailor, his early training was in the public 
schools of LaPorte, and after leaving the high school he learned the 
trade of baker. Coming to Whiting in 1889, about the time the Stand- 
ard Oil Company began the construction of its plant, he opened the 
first bakery and restaurant in the town, his partner being Callus 
Bader. Both interested themselves in real estate at the same time, and 
gradually the restaurant became a side issue, and was finally sold about 
1898. Messrs. Smith & Bader were the organizers of the First National 
Bank of Whiting and are still the active head of that institution, a 
brief sketch of which is found on other pages. In 1905 they bought 
out the interests of Mr. Erskin in the Indiana Harbor National Bank 
and the First National Bank of East Chicago, and both Mr. Smith 
and Mr. Bader are directors in those institutions. In 1908 they organized 
the First State Bank of Tolleston, now in Gary. In 1913 the International 
Trust & Savings Bank was established by them at Gary. Besides these 
extensive financial interests Messrs. Smith & Bader are stockholders 
in several lumber yards conducted at different points in the Calumet 
district, assisted in the organization of the Petrolene Company of Whit- 
ing, and the Westrumite Company of Whiting. 

Mr. Smith, though a busy man and with' the weight of large affairs 
on his shoulders, has manifested his public spirit through service to 
the community as mayor of Whiting from 1906 to 1910 and has the 
distinction of being elected the first trustee when Whiting was organized 
as a town. 

Mr. Smith owns one of the fine homes in Whiting and is justly proud 
of his family. On April 11, 1888, he was married to Helen Maas, of 
La Porte. Their three sons are : Russell, who is manager of the Lake 
Sand Company of Chicago ; Walter, a law student in the University of 
Chicago, and Lawrence, who is in the University of Illinois. Mr. Smith 
is a democrat in politics, though casting his vote independently and 
rather for the man than for the party, and in his religious affiliations is 
a member of the Lutheran Church. 

A. J. Lauer, M. D. In active practice as a physician and surgeon 
at Whiting for more than twenty years, Doctor Lauer came to that 
city well equipped for his work, and has enjoyed the confidence and 
patronage of the best classes, and has high standing in the medical 
fraternity of Lake County. 

Dr. A. J. Lauer was born at Rochester, Indiana, December 14, 1871, 
a son of Joseph and Mary Lauer, his father a merchant. With a public 
school education ending with the high school, Doctor Lauer equipped 
himself for his life work at the Bennett Medical College in Chicago, grad- 
uating M. D. in 1893, and after six months of practice at Monterey, 
Indiana, established an office in Whiting in 1893. His practice is of a 
general nature and he is one of the oldest physicians in the city. He 
has membership in all the medical societies and fraternally is identified 
with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. Doctor Lauer is 
married and has one child, Gertrude. 

George H. Hoskins, M. D. Both in the character of his practice and 
the value of his service to the community, Doctor Hoskins is recognized 



616 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

as one of the leading physicians and surgeons at Whiting, where his 
home and professional work . have been for more than fifteen years. 
Doctor Hoskins had to depend upon himself during his youth, did hard 
manual and clerical labor for several years in order to pay his way 
through medical college, and both for that reason and on account of his 
skillful services since beginning practice his accomplishments are in 
the highest degree creditable. 

Dr. George H. Hoskins was born at Essex, New York, October 18, 
1872, a son of Henry E. and Mary E. (Mather) Hoskins. After the 
death of his father in 1876, his mother moved out to Grant Park, Illi- 
nois, and it was in that town that Doctor Hoskins grew up and received 
his early schooling. Subsequently he graduated in the Normal Depart- 
ment from Valparaiso University, and for several years was employed 
by the Esch Bros. & Rabe Ice Company of Chicago. In 1894 he entered 
Northwestern University Medical Department, and was graduated M. D. 
in June, 1898. His practice began at Whiting on July 5 of the same 
year, and he has been continuously identified with that city and has a 
large general practice. Doctor Hoskins has served as vice president 
of the Lake County Medical Society and has membership in both the 
State and American Medical Associations. From 1904 to 1908 he 
served as county coroner of Lake County. 

On October 24, 1900, Doctor Hoskins married Bertha E. Dewey, of 
Grant Park, Illinois. Their three children are George H., Harley D., 
and Bertha E. Doctor Hoskins has affiliations with the Masonic Order 
through the Lodge, Royal Arch Chapter, Knights Templar Command- 
ery and the Mystic Shrine, and also with the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks. In politics he is republican. 

William H. Wolter. As a practical business man and progressive 
citizen Hammond has none better than William H. Wolter, whose enter- 
prise as a hardware dealer is known as one of the landmarks of the trad- 
ing district, and who recently retired from long service as city treasurer. 
Experience, industry, concentration and good judgment have been respon- 
sible for the rise of Mr. Wolter from a position of clerk to an independ- 
ent business man. 

William H. Wolter was born in Chicago on July 6, 1872, a son of 
William and Augusta Wolter. Educated in private schools, he early 
began making his own way by clerking in grocery and clothing stores. 
From Chicago he came to Hammond, and after fourteen years of experi- 
ence in the employ of others in 1901 established a hardware business of 
his own, and the Wolter store at 480-482 Hohman Street has a reputa- 
tion for reliable goods and the best ideals of mercantile enterprise, and 
a large proportion of its customers have been patronizing it steadily 
year after year. 

In 1906 Mr. Wolter was elected city treasurer of Hammond, and his 
service was continuous until 1914. Besides his hardware business he is 
a director in the Hammond Brass Works, is a director in the Riverview 
Land and Investment Company of Gary, and is vice president of the 
La Vendor Cigar Company. He belongs to the Chamber of Commerce 
and the Country Club, is affiliated with the Masonic Order and the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and Hammond people in gen- 
eral estimate him as a broad gauge and liberal business man and enter- 
prising citizen. 



%MJ*~~ %P. ?(?*£te» 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 617 

On May 6, 1894, Mr. Wolter married Elizabeth Pleitner of Crown 
Point. Their three children are Lydia, a high school student, and Wil- 
fred and Arthur, twins. 

Roy E. Green. A member of the Whiting bar for the past four 
years, Mr. Green is the present incumbent of the responsible office of 
city judge, and is one of the most popular of the municipal officers and 
his accomplishments promise an exceedingly successful career in the 
law and in public affairs. 

Roy E. Green was born in Chicago, July 17, 1887. His parents, 
Edwin and Minnie E. Green, moved to Whiting in 1891. Roy E. Green 
is a graduate of the Whiting High School, was a student for a time in 
the University of Chicago, but in 1911 took his law degree at the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, and was admitted to the bar in the same year. For 
a year and a half his practice was in association with Frank Gavit at 
Whiting, but on March 4, 1913, he became junior member of the law 
firm of Fetterhoff & Green, his partner being Mr. J. H. Fetterhoff. Mr. 
Green was elected city judge of Whiting in the fall of 1913 and is now 
serving on a four year term. 

On February 29, 1912, he married Ella Klose of Whiting, a daugh- 
ter of Robert and Augusta Klose. They are the parents of one daughter, 
Doris Jane. Mr. Green has affiliations with the Masonic Lodge, the 
Owl Club, is a progressive in polities, and with his family worships in 
the Congregational faith. 

L. J. Scritchfield. One of the native sons of Lowell who grew up 
here and has been known to the community practically all his life is 
L. J. Scritchfield, who after some years of experience in other towns 
and cities returned to his native city and is now proprietor of a flour- 
ishing business as druggist. 

L. J. Scritchfield was born at Lowell December 18, 1885, attended 
the public schools, graduating from the high school in 1905, and then 
took a course in pharmacy in Purdue University at Lafayette, finishing 
in 1907. In the same year he went to Detroit, and was employed with 
the great drag manufacturing house of Parke, Davis & Company until 
1909. Then followed a year of employment with the Lowell druggist, 
D. C. Driscoll, but in 1910 Mr. Scritchfield became a chemist in the 
coke laboratory at the Indiana Steel Company's plant in Gary. On 
August 1, 1913, Mr. Scritchfield returned to Lowell and bought out the 
business of Mr. D. C. Driscoll, and has since been one of the independent 
merchants of this beautiful residence town of Lake County. His store 
occupies space 25x75 feet, and the equipment comprises a full line of 
drugs, wall paper, paints, and it is one of the chain of Rexall stores. 

Mr. Scritchfield was married July 14, 1912, to Hazel E. Smith, a 
graduate of the Crown Point High School and a resident of that city 
before her marriage. They have one child, Virginia, born in 1913. Mr. 
Scritchfield is a member of Colfax Lodge, No. 387, A. F. & A. M., and 
also of the Order of Eastern Star. In politics he is independent, and 
his church is the Methodist. 

George W. Davis. The recent retirement of George W. Davis was 
justified by the accomplishment of success in its most desirable form, 
by years of devotion to the various enterprises with which he was con- 

tol. II— 10 



618 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

nected, by faithfulness to trust in war and in peace, and by honorable 
service in public office. Although many years of his life have been 
passed outside the limits of his native state, he has always been true 
to its best interests, and now, in the evening of life, he is passing the 
years in comfort, surrounded by the luxuries which his former industry 
brought to him. 

Mr. Davis was born at Orchard Grove, Lake County, Indiana, April 
23, 1847, and secured his education in the country schools. His boy- 
hood was passed amid pioneer surroundings, and his memory takes him 
back to the days when deer, wild geese and wild ducks were plentiful 
in this region, and when there was not a building standing between 
Orchard Grove and Crown Point. An industrious and enterprising 
lad, he was twelve years of age when he laid aside his school books and 
began to devote all his energies to assisting his father in the work of the 
home farm, and was thus engaged when the Civil war broke out and 
called the youth of the land for the defense of the flag. At that time 
he was too young to be accepted as a soldier, but in 1863, when only 
sixteen years old, was successful in enlisting in an Indiana regiment of 
volunteers, and subsequently participated in the great Georgia cam- 
paign under General Stoneman. Following Sherman's famous march 
to the sea, his command was sent back to Tennessee, where he saw 
service until the fall of 1865 and was then granted his honorable dis- 
charge, at Murfreesboro. Although little more than a child, he played 
a man's part in the engagements in which he participated, and his 
company had no more brave or faithful soldier. On the completion of 
his service, he returned to Orchard Lake and resumed farming, in which 
he continued to be engaged until 1870, in which year he moved to Kan- 
sas. There he was engaged in a variety of pursuits, principally farm- 
ing and hardware merchandising, and while a resident of Woodson 
County, Kansas, served in the capacity of sheriff for two years. Later 
he embarked in the retail hardware business in Kiowa County, Kansas, 
and while there was elected county treasurer for one term. In 1892 
Mr. Davis returned to Lake County, where he has since resided, and 
now owns his own home and other town property, as well as a tract 
of timber land and much pasture land outside of town. Mr. Davis has 
led a career that is unblemished by selfishness, for at all times he bas 
been ready to assist others to the success that he himself has so worthily 
attained. He is able to rest content in the knowledge of his steadfast 
fidelity to the obligations of duty, and of the high regard and esteem 
in which he is held by those who know him best. 

In May, 1867, Mr. Davis was married to Miss Alverdia M. Handley. 
of Orchard Grove, Indiana, who was educated in the country schools, 
and still survives in a hale and hearty old age. She has been a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church since her twelfth year, and is still 
active in church and Sunday school work. Mr. and Mrs. Davis have 
an adopted son, Ernest M., whom they took to their home and hearts 
when he was an infant, and who for fifteen years has been a traveling 
salesman for a hardware concern. He is a resident of Chanute, Kansas, 
is married and has three children. Politically Mr. Davis was for many 
years identified with the republican party, but since 1912 has given his 
allegiance to the progressives. He has, however, retired from public 
life, and takes only that interest in political matters that is taken by 
every good citizen. 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 619 

Young Men's Christian Association of Gary. To those who are 
moderately familiar with the scope of the work of the Y. M. C. A. else- 
where, the Gary association will be noteworthy chiefly because so much 
has been accomplished in a short time, and because the institution has 
adapted itself so splendidly to the varied and complicated demands put 
upon it in its efforts to serve that industrial center, with its thousands of 
inhabitants, speaking polyglot languages, representing all creeds and 
practically all nations and of all types of intellectuality and culture. 
Those who are not so familiar with Y. M. C. A. work would be astonished 
at the breadth and completeness of its system and organization and the 
numerous departments of its w r ork. The Gary association is more than 
a home for Christian young men ; it is a university, a club, a place for 
physical, moral and intellectual pleasure, a social center, and more than 
any other one institution in the city, satisfies the natural desires of 
wholesome young manhood for intellectual and social diversions, physical 
training, and moral and religious growth. 

The Gary association building in its size, its architectural simplicity 
and beauty, is on a par with the splendid school and other public and 
semi-public buildings, which are the source of such pride to all Gary 
citizens. The building was dedicated on February 4, 1912, and its total 
cost was $274,000. The construction of this handsome home for young 
men in Gary was made possible through the generosity of Judge E. H. 
Gary. A tablet in the lobby of the building, containing a medallion 
portrait of Judge Gary, recites the fact that "this building and site 
are the gift of Elbert H. Gary, 1910." Also, occupying the main por- 
tion of the tablet, is the following inscription: "In appreciation of his 
friendship and of his generous gift which have made the erection of 
this building possible, the Young Men's Christian Association of Gary 
has raised this tablet, that all may know him as a benefactor of the whole 
community through this Christian institution." 

The association of Gary was incorporated February 10, 1910. Some 
of the leading men of the city were its first trustees, and all the original 
trustees are still in active service, named as follows: William P. Glea- 
son, chairman ; Horace S. Norton, Samuel Miller, A. R. McArthur and 
John Kirk. 

The first directors of the association were: W. H. Kliver, W. A. 
Wirt, C. A. DeLong, H. G. Hay, Jr., A. B. Keller, Frank Traver, Charles 
W. Hawthorne, M. N. Goodnow, C. V. Ridgeley, T. H. Cutler, L. W. 
McNamee, C. O. Holmes. Mr. Wirt was the first president of the board 
of directors, and was succeeded by the present incumbent of that office, 
on March 4, 1911, Mr. A. B. Keiler. L. W. McNamee, vice president, 
C. A. DeLong, recording secretary, and Thos. H. Cutler, treasurer, have 
all held office from the first. Mr. C. M. Mayne was elected general secre- 
tary in June, 1911, and has been in active charge of the work of the 
association since August, of that year. 

Judge Gary contributed $234,000 for the erection of the association 
building, while the steel corporation put in all the equipment. While 
the spacious reception room, the assembly room, the dining rooms and 
dormitories, the gymnasium, the quarters set aside for games, the read- 
ing room and other special facilities, all worthy of note, measure up 
to the high standard set by the best Y. M. C. A. associations in the coun- 
try, it is probable that the most conspicuous feature of the Gary in- 
stitution is what is known as the Association Institute. This is in prac- 
tical operation a university, affording a comprehensive literary train- 



620 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

ing, the opportunities of a school of technology, and also those of a com- 
mercial school. There is a department of languages in which are afforded 
special advantages to foreigners who desire to perfect their knowledge 
of English, and at the same time courses are offered in French, Ger- 
man. Spanish and other continental tongues. There are well-equipped 
laboratories for the study of physics, chemistry, applied electricity, 
engineering, architecture, and many other practical arts. The commer- 
cial courses offer training in shorthand, typewriting, commercial Eng- 
lish and business forms, arithmetic, and commercial law. All the courses 
have been arranged and systematized, not for the purpose of copying 
some other similar institution in another city, nor on a theoretical plan, 
but to serve the practical requirements of Gary and those who come as 
students to the institute, and this educational feature alone is sufficient 
to justify the existence of the Gary association. The first classes were 
begun early in 1912, and by the close of the first term, 275 persons had 
enrolled for courses of instruction. 

C. M. Mayne. The general secretary of the Young Men's Christian 
Association of Gary, who has been at the head of the association 's work 
since it began, has had a long and active experience in this line, hav- 
ing served the Y. M. C. A. of Omaha and Lincoln, Nebraska, before 
coming to Gary. He is devoted to his work, and both by his own experi 
ence and training and character has a deep insight and sympathetic 
appreciation of the needs of young men, so that his fitness for his heavy 
responsibilities is undisputed. 

C. M. Mayne was born in Potosi, Wisconsin, in 1871, a son of Rev. 
Nicholas and Mary Mayne. His father was a Congregational minister. 
Mr. Mayne had a liberal education, was a student in the Platteville Nor- 
mal School of Wisconsin, and later in the Beloit College in the same 
state. After a brief experience in newspaper work, he went on the 'road 
and traveled for two years, representing a lyceum bureau and also a 
school text book publishing house. Mr. Mayne has been in Y. M. C. A. 
work for twenty years. On September 4, 1894, he became assistant in 
the Omaha association, where he remained six years, and in 1900 took 
charge of the association of Lincoln, Nebraska, as general secretary, and 
was there eleven years, coming to Gary in August, 1911. 

On March 6. 1895, Mr. Mayne married Celia Booth, of Omaha. Their 
four children are Norman, Willis, Mary and Dorothy. Mr. Mayne 
lias membership in the Gary Commercial Club and is independent in 
politics. 

Konstantine M. Woszczynski. While America has been the land 
of opportunity for the millions of Europe for many years, it is a proof 
of unusual ability, exceptional business integrity, and leadership among 
men. when a young man can come across the seas and in a few years 
reach a successful place in business and besides his official relations with 
banks and business organizations be honored as mayor of a city and take 
a prominent part in public affairs. Such has been the distinction of 
Konstantine M. Woszczynski, now mayor of the City of West Hammond, 
and for many years identified witli that community. 

Konstantine M. Woszczynski was born in German Poland August 
12. 1872, a son of Vincent and Theophilia Woszczynski. The father 
was a farmer. With an education acquired in the common schools of 
his native land, Mr. Woszczynski came to America in 1899, at the age of 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 621 

seventeen, and for the first six years was employed in a bicycle factory 
in Chicago. His residence at West Hammond dates from 1895, and he 
was lirst known in the community as a worker in the Simplex factory. 
He was a machine hand for three years, and then was made foreman in 
the polishing and plating department of the Tube Works, which place 
he held two years. For three years he was foreman in the Enterprise 
Bed Company, and then gave most of his attention to the operation of 
a moving picture house in East Chicago. In 1908 he established a saloon 
on State Line Street. 

For three terms Mr. Woszczynski was trustee of the Village of West 
Hammond, and on the incorporation of the city was elected mayor in 
1911 and in 1912 was chosen for a term of two years. He is a former 
president of the Board of Directors of the public schools of West Ham- 
mond, and had a very important part in the management of the school 
interests of that locality. It was due to the enterprise of Mr. Woszczyn- 
ski that the King John III Sobieski No. 1 Building and Loan Association 
of West Hammond was organized, and he has been secretary of that fine 
institution since the beginning. It was organized in 1901, and its present 
resources total $110,000. Mr. Woszczynski is also a director of the West 
Hammond Trust & Savings Bank. 

In November, 1895, at Chicago, he married Mary Bizan, who was 
born in German Poland. Their four children are : Mieczyslaus, attend- 
ing high school ; Alf ons ; Henry ; and Alice. The family worship in St. 
Andrew's Church. 

Edwin H. Farr. The Whiting Call, one of the most widely read 
weekly papers in Lake County, was established June 16, 1906, by Edwin 
H. Farr, who has been identified with the printing and newspaper busi- 
ness nearly all his life, and has broad experience in Chicago and else- 
where. The Call has a weekly issue, an eight-page paper, and every- 
thing is home print. 

Edwin H. Farr was born at Glens Falls, New York, November 
16, 1873, a son of Reuben and Mary (Sinclair) Farr. His father was 
a contractor, and in 1882 the family moved out to Hinsdale, Illinois, 
where Edwin was reared and received a public school education. While 
at Hinsdale he entered the printing business, subsequently worked in 
Chicago at his trade, and in 1894 became editor of the Farmers Advo- 
cate at Malone, New York. After four months he again returned to 
Chicago, was employed in different offices, and in 1904 leased the Whit- 
ing News. Two years later he established the Whiting Call and has 
since been its proprietor and editor. 

Mr. Farr was married October 30, 1898, to Anna Katherine Well- 
man, of Chicago. Their three children are Alice, Edwin and Estelle. 
Mr. Farr has fraternal relations with the Fraternal Order of Eagles 
and in politics is a progressive. 

John A. Brennan. A man of affairs, whose investments, enterprises 
and influence have been important factors in the upbuilding of Gary 
almost from the establishment of that city, is John A. Brennan, who is 
one of the pioneers of Gary by reason of having come to the city in 
1906, and who had previously been a successful contractor and in other 
lines of business in Pennsylvania and elsewhere. 

Pennsylvania is Mr. Brennan 's native state and he was born at Car- 
bondale, December 16, 1864. With a public school education, reenforeed 



622 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

by attendance at St. Bonaventure's College of New York, he spent five 
of the earlier years of his career as a school teacher in Pennsylvania. 
Subsequently he engaged in contracting, and also did a large amount 
of prospecting in coal and mineral lines. On coming to Gary in 1906, 
Mr. Brennan built and completed, in the following year, the Brennan 
Block, one of the notable structures of the business district, at the south- 
west corner of Sixth and Broadway. For several years he was in the 
drug business with Harry Stringfellow, but has since retired from that 
line of merchandising. A number of buildings have been constructed 
with the capital of Mr. Brennan in Gary, including the Hotel Wash- 
ington, and he is one of the proprietors of the Victoria Hotel in this 
city. He has the distinction of having erected the first business build- 
ing in the Ambridge District. 

Mr. Brennan has three children. He is a charter member of the 
Gary Lodge of Elks, and served as its second exalted ruler, and is a 
grand knight of the Knights of Columbus. His church is the Catholic. 
He is a republican in politics, and was the first candidate of that party 
for the office of mayor of the City of Gary, in 1909. His defeat was 
by the narrow margin of seventy-one votes. 

American Bridge Company. In many ways the most advanced type 
of modern industrialism of Gary, is the American Bridge Company's 
plant. It is an immense factory, with efficiency and system in evidence 
down to the last detail, but at the same time has an environment and 
sanitary and comfort conveniences that are more suggestive of a college 
campus than a factory for strictly business purposes. 

The general office and the works occupy a beautiful site on the grand 
Calumet, near Ambridge Street. Across the river from the works is the 
handsome suburb of workmen's modern homes. The site of the plant 
occupies about one hundred and forty acres, and in the first units of 
the plant are already employed about fifteen hundred men. On account 
of the distance from Gary the Gary Land Company erected some three 
hundred houses, all of modern design and with all the conveniences, to 
be used exclusively by the workmen. 

The American Bridge Company was established at Gary, in 1909, 
in which year the grounds were surveyed and the first building con- 
struction was begun in 1910. The present units in operation have a 
capacity of 120,000 tons of finished product each year. The output is 
bridge and structural steel. The raw material is brought from the roll- 
ing mills at South Chicago and Gary. The rolled steel is brought into 
the bridge shops, and is rewrought and fitted together on order so that 
the material, when it goes out from the Gary works, is complete and ready 
for erection. Some of the largest modern skyscrapers in the country 
are built from structural steel furnished by the Gary plant. 

A notable feature of the works is the handsome three-story general 
office building, which is regarded as the finest office building in Gary, 
built on a foundation 44x150 feet, fireproof, and of reinforced concrete 
construction. In the general office are employed at present a staff of 
about one hundred and fifty engineers and draftsmen, superintendents 
and general clerical force. On one floor is found a handsome recreation 
and lunchroom, where employes assemble at the lunch hour. Nearby is 
a splendid athletic field, and the welfare of the employes is carefully 
looked after. The Gary plant is located on the Elgin, Joliet and Eastern 
Railway, having twelve side tracks and trackage of about five miles. 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 623 

Throughout the works the motive power is electricity, and there is no 
subsidiary plant of the steel corporation equipped with more perfect 
and later machinery and appliances and efficiency methods than the 
Gary works. 

Twenty-five years ago, George M. Hunter, manager of the Gary plant, 
was a boy worker in the ranks of one of the plants since merged with 
the larger corporation now known as the American Bridge Company, 
It was by a capacity and talent for hard work and skillful management 
of industrial details that brought him by successive stages to his present 
executive position. 

George M. Hunter was born in Scotland, in 1875, a son of Eobert and 
Helen Hunter. His father first came to the United States when a young 
man and was engaged in the coal business at Youngstown, Ohio, later 
returned to his native land, was married and brought his bride to his 
new home in the new world. Out of seven children, George M. Hunter 
was the only one born in Scotland, and his birth occurred there while 
his parents were on a visit. He grew up and received a public school 
education at Youngstown, and in 1889, when fourteen years of age, 
entered the employ of the Youngstown Bridge Company. That plant 
was merged with the American Bridge Company in 1900. In the mean- 
time, Mr. Hunter had been promoted again and again, finally went to 
Pittsburgh as assistant to the operating division manager, and in 1902 
was made manager of the Youngstown plant, where he had received his 
first experience. In 1904 he was made assistant manager of the Ambridge 
plant near Pittsburgh and remained there until 1910, when he was 
assigned to the Gary works, which eventually will become the largest 
plant of its kind in the world. 

In 1901 Mr. Hunter married Grace Brownlee of Youngstown. They 
are the parents of three children. Mr. Hunter has identified himself 
closely with Gary affairs since taking up his residence there, and was a 
member of the library board when the handsome Gary Public Library 
was built. He is a Royal Arch Mason, also belongs to the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks, has membership in the Gary Commercial 
Club, and in politics is a republican. 

W. G. Wright. The business men of Gary are to a remarkable de- 
gree characterized by public spirit and an energy in promoting the 
substantial welfare of the city, which is not less noteworthy in a survey 
of this remarkable industrial center, than the splendid material achieve- 
ments. They are men who, while looking after their private interests, 
are always willing to get out and work for some advantage only remotely 
connected with a selfish advantage, and it is a fine augury for the future 
that Gary contains so large a group of this class. 

One of the Gary boosters who has made himself useful in many ways 
is W. G. Wright, who occupies a handsome office at the corner of Sixth 
avenue and Washington Street, and who owns and controls some eight 
hundred acres within the city limits of Gary. Mr. Wright recently 
published, at large expense, a handsome booklet entitled "Gary," which 
though filled with halftone illustrations depicting all the most conspicu- 
ous features of the city, and graphically showing the contrast between 
the modern city and the conditions there only a few years ago, is also 
supplied with a text story of Gary, which contains an excellent epitome 
of local history. Such a booklet is a splendid advertisement for the city 
as a whole, and serves better than any other medium to indicate what 



624 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

modern Gary stands for, not only as a center for the production of steel 
and other products, but also as a wonderful civic and social community. 

W. G. Wright is a Canadian by birth, born in 1867, a son of George 
C. and Elizabeth (Goldsmith) Wright. The parents, in 1878, went to 
the far West, and in Manitoba homesteaded land, in what was then a 
frontier country. The Wright family were originally residents of the 
American Colonies, and at the time of the Revolution remained loyal to 
the mother country and emigrated north to Canada. There were four 
sons in the family, and the father became a large landowner in Manitoba. 
W. G. Wright was educated in the Western province in the public schools, 
and also attended the Wesleyan College at Winnipeg, Manitoba. 

In 1896 he moved to Chicago, and for some years was engaged in the 
life insurance and in the stock and bond business. Coming to Gary in 
the fall of 1909, he established himself in the real-estate business, and 
has since acquired interests and conducted a business second to none in 
that line. Mr. Wright was married in 1901, to Miss Agnes White of 
Ontario, and they are the parents of one child. Fraternally Mr. Wright 
affiliates with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and belongs 
to the Hamilton Club of Chicago. 

The Indiana and Illinois Land Company. This is one of the larg- 
est companies engaged in the sale and improvement of new subdivisions 
in and about the City of Gary. The company was incorporated in 
1906, and while its operations are not confined to Gary, that city is its 
headquarters and for several years most of the business has been done 
in that locality. Charles A. Murphy is president of the company, and 
J. P. Tolliver is secretary and active manager. 

The Indiana and Illinois Land Company in 1907 offered to the public 
the Highland Park Addition of twenty acres, which was subdivided and 
sold in building lots, lying between Forty-first and Forty-third avenues 
and Jackson and Harrison streets. In the same year was put on the 
second Highland Park Addition of forty-three acres, lying between 
Delaware and Georgia streets and 37th and 39th avenues. The com- 
pany still has six acres undivided, besides a great deal of property 
scattered in small blocks in and about the city. An important feature 
of the company's work has been the building of homes either by 
private contract with purchasers, or in advance of sale, and these 
homes are sold on advantageous terms to the people of Gary who want 
homes of their own, but have only moderate means and income to pay for 
them. The company since its organization has sold, and in many cases 
improved, 583 lots to date. Among other properties controlled by the 
company is a two-story brick block, at 3958 Broadway. 

Mr. J. P. Tolliver, who since 1911 has been the active manager of the 
company at Gary, is a Tennessee man, born in that state in 1875, a son 
of J. B. and Caroline Tolliver. During his young manhood Mr. Tolli- 
ver attended the Cumberland University at Lebanon, Tennessee, and his 
first active experience in business affairs was in the general offices of the 
Illinois Central Railway at Chicago. He first became interested in Gary 
in a business way in 1908, and has had his home in the city since 1911. 
In the latter year he became identified with the Indiana and Illinois 
Land Company, and has been its secretary and active manager since 
that day. Mr. Tolliver is also secretary and treasurer of the Port Huron 
Packing Company, and which bids fair to become one of the mainstays 
of commercial prosperity in that locality. The company invested $50,000 



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LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 625 

in buildings in 1913, and during that year the payroll of the company 
amounted to $18,000, so that it is already a valuable asset to the com- 
munity. Mr. Tolliver is a democrat in politics, and a member of the 
Gary Commercial Club. 

Rev. Benedict Rajcany. One of the most vigorous church organiza- 
tions in Whiting is St. John the Baptist Church, established in 1897 as 
a religious center for the Slavish people of Whiting and vicinity. It has 
now a church membership of about two thousand souls, whose spiritual 
leader and adviser is known both within and without the parish as "Little 
Father Benedict," a priest whose zeal for religion, whose ardent Amer- 
ican patriotism, and whose charity and public spirit are not to be meas- 
ured by the physical stature which nature has given him. 

Owing to the fact that the Sacred Heart Church was becoming inade- 
quate to meet the needs of the growing foreign population, Bishop Rade- 
macher sent to Hungary for a priest who could speak the Slavish tongue 
and could administer to the needs of that people. In 1897 Father Bene- 
dict came and organized the parish, put up a church, rectory and secured 
accommodations for teachers and pupils. His organization progressed in 
spite of hardships and misfortunes, and the material development of the 
parish was crowned with the erection of a handsome new church in 1912 
at a cost of $18,000. The people of the parish credit Father Benedict 
with practically all the honors of this achievement. At the present time 
the school has 436 students with eight teachers and the church grounds 
have been improved both in appearance and in value, and the priest's 
residence is in the midst of fiowers and shrubbery, indicative of the faith 
of this devoted Slavish priest. Father Rajcany also looks after the 
interests of his people in East Chicago and Indiana Harbor. 

Father Benedict was born February 2, 1869, at Galgocz, Hungary, 
was trained for the priesthood in the Franciscan Order, and was ordained 
January 23, 1892, and did his work in his native land until called to 
America by Bishop Rademacher in 1897. 

Harry Stringfellow. When Gary has attained the dignity of long 
years, such as is enjoyed by many lesser cities of the Middle West, the 
perspective of history will single out and give prominence to those who 
were pioneers in the different branches of trade and industry and in 
citizenship. The honor of being the proprietor of the first exclusive 
drug store in the city will belong to Harry Stringfellow, whose mer- 
cantile activities in that line began soon after the establishment of the 
industrial city, and who is still in business, and has two large and finely 
equipped stores. 

Harry Stringfellow was born at Findlay, Ohio, in 1873, a son of 
Benjamin and Catherine Stringfellow. His father was a farmer; he 
grew up in the country, and had the advantages of the public schools, 
while later he entered the Ohio State University, and in 1890 finished 
a course in pharmacy. In 1891 he opened a store at Elwood, Indiana, 
and remained in that city until 1895. Elwood was at that time prac- 
tically a new community, a center of great industrial development follow- 
ing the development of the natural gas field in that section of Indiana, 
and thus Mr. Stringfellow has been an early merchant in two Indiana 
cities. From Elwood he moved to Akron, Ohio, where he remained until 
1904, and then returned to Elwood and bought another store. Early 
in 1907 Mr. Stringfellow came to Gary, and opened the first drug store 



626 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

in a building at the corner of Sixth and Broadway. Subsequently he 
sold out at that location, and established his place of business at Fifth 
Avenue and Ambridge. In April, 1913 he extended his business by open- 
ing up a store at Fifth and Broadway. He is a live and enterprising 
merchant, thoroughly familiar with the drug trade, and has enjoyed 
a share of the large prosperity which has characterized Gary since its 
establishment. 

On September 23, 1896, Mr. Stringfellow married Mary Carlton, of 
Elwood, Indiana. They have one son, Carlton. Mr. Stringfellow affiliates 
with the Masonic order, the Benevolent and Portective Order of Elks, 
and the Gary Commercial Club. A republican in politics, he is now 
serving as a member of the board of public works. 

J. L. Pyle. The career of Mr. Pyle as a building contractor covers 
nearly twenty-five years. His experience has been in various parts of 
the country, both East and West, and he arrived at Gary in May of 
1906, at a time when practically nothing had been done towards the 
development of the site except the drawing of plans and the inception 
of some of the great work undertaken by the steel corporation. Mr. 
Pyle's services and organization has been employed in the construction 
of a large number of the more important business and private build- 
ings at Gary. He has taken pains to furnish adequate service, provides 
for reliable fulfillment of all contractual promises, and a financially 
responsible management, so that any business entrusted to his charge 
is practically assured of satisfactory performance. 

Mr. Pyle has built the Reynolds Building, the Brant flat building, 
the Massachusetts flats, the Salinger apartments, the Iowa flats, the John 
Kirk flats and also his private residence, the Harries Building, the North- 
ern State Bank Building, the Tin Plate office building, the office build- 
ing at Gibson of the C. I. & S. Railway Company, besides many smaller 
structures of various types. 

J. L. Pyle is a native of Pennsylvania, where he was born in 1860, 
a son of William and Sarah Pyle. His father was a Pennsylvania farmer, 
and the son grew up in the country, attended school during his boy- 
hood, and after a variety of experience, engaged in the contracting busi- 
ness in Pennsylvania when he was thirty years of age. From 1905, for 
about sixteen months, Mr. Pyle was in business at Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia, moved to Chicago in 1905, and from there to Gary in 1907. Mr. 
Pyle in 1905 married Rose O'Brien of Newcastle, Pennsylvania. His 
fraternal affiliations are with the Masonic order, his name is on the list 
of membership in the Gary Commercial Club, and in politics he classifies 
as a progressive republican. 

Joseph Frost. The business record of Joseph Frost in Gary, as a 
contractor and builder, covers a period since the beginning of the city, 
in the year 1906, and has resulted in a large amount of construction 
work, much of it during the first years, in the building of homes for the 
steel company, and later his independent enterprise has extended to the 
buying of property and the building of homes and other structures, 
which he has subsequently sold to private investors and home owners. 

Joseph Frost is a native of England, born in 1878, at Lydney in 
Gloucester, a son of George and Eliza (Anthony) Frost, His father 
was a blacksmith by trade. The son obtained a public school education, 
and early in life entered upon a somewhat varied and interesting career 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 627 

as a contractor and builder. For five years he operated along those 
lines in South Africa, and after coming to the United States, in 1906, 
prepared himself for greater usefulness in his profession by taking a 
course of study in the Valparaiso University. In November, 1906, he 
located at Gary, and was employed by the Falkeneau Construction Com- 
pany, a concern which erected about four hundred and fifty houses for 
the steel corporation. Since 1908 Mr. Frost has been in business on 
his own account, and only a few of the more notable features of his 
work can be noticed. He built the Sydney Hotel, the Lyndon apart- 
ments, besides several other apartment buildings, the Majestic Theatre, 
and a large number of residences. His work on an independent scale 
has comprised the purchase of about sixty lots from the Gary Land 
Company, all of which have been improved with buildings, and much 
of this property sold and the rest now being rented. Mr. Frost is affili- 
ated with the Masonic order and the Knights of Pythias, is an active 
member of the Gary Commercial Club, the Gary Y. M. C. A., is a Con- 
gregationalist in religion, and in politics a progressive. 

L. P. Godwin. A business man of Gary since 1907, L. P. Godwin 
is one of the most progressive and enterprising real-estate men in the 
Calumet region, and has not only done a large volume of business, but 
also a business whose character results in the permanent improvement 
and benefit of the City of Gary and vicinity. His reputation in real- 
estate circles is based on reliable dealings and high-class methods. 

Born in Virginia, in 1879, a son of Charles E. and Anna W. Godwin, 
his father a farmer, L. P. Godwin was reared in his native state, and 
completed his education in the Randolph-Macon College. He was thus 
started in life with several distinct advantages, including his early 
environment of the country, a liberal education, and a good family 
name. His early business career was in the produce trade, and for six 
years he was identified with the fruit and produce business at Boston, 
Massachusetts, and then spent a year in the interest of the California 
Citrus Union in California. From the West he located in Chicago, spent 
two years in the real-estate business in that city, and in 1907 moved to 
Gary, and has since been one of the active operators in that city. 

Mr. Godwin is secretary and treasurer of the Gary Investment Com- 
pany and secretary and treasurer of the East Side Realty Company, and 
has a similar position with the Broadway Realty and Investment Com- 
pany. In connection with these companies he has been active in pro- 
moting the sales of the Gary Investment Company's subdivision of 300 
lots in section 10, during 1907 ; the Broadway Realty Investment Com- 
pany's addition of 400 lots at Forty-fifth Avenue and Broadway, in 
1911; and the East Side Realty Company's subdivision of fifty lots in 
McKey's addition during 1912. 

Mr. Godwin was married in Chicago in December, 1909, to Eva M. 
Burns of St. Louis. Mr. Godwin is a charter member of the Gary Com- 
mercial Club, affiliates -with the Masonic order, is a member of the Epis- 
copal Church, and in polities a republican. 

Judge Cassius M. Greenlee. Now in successful practice as a mem- 
ber of the Gary bar, Judge Greenlee has been an Indiana lawyer for thirty 
years, practiced a long time at Anderson, and after four years of service 
as judge of the Superior Court, came to Gary, and has a very success- 
ful and important practice as representative of corporate and individual 
clients. 



628 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

Cassius M. Greenlee was born in Franklin County, Indiana, Septem- 
ber 15, 1857. His parents were John and Angeline (Bartlow) Green- 
lee. His mother, who was a native of Franklin County, was the daugh- 
ter of Cornelius Bartlow, one of the early settlers in that part of the 
state, who moved there from New England and was a farmer by occu- 
pation. Judge Greenlee's father was a native of Pennsylvania, and 
after locating in Franklin County, Indiana, followed contracting. Judge 
Greenlee grew up in the counties of Franklin and Henry, passing through 
the usual experiences of an Indiana boy, attended the public schools 
and early in his career directed his ambitions to the legal profession. 
During this time he taught school for a period of eight years in Indiana, 
at the age of eighteen years obtaining a license for two years. After 
reading law for several years he was admitted to the bar in 1884, and 
was an active member of the Madison County bar at Anderson, until 
1904. In that year, he was elected judge of the Superior Court, and 
served until 1908. On June 1, 1909, Judge Greenlee opened his office 
at Gary, with Harry Call, who had formerly been a student of law under 
Judge Greenlee. 

He married Hermenia Bresler of Franklin County, Indiana, and at 
her death, in 1902, she left one daughter, Grace, now the wife of W. J. 
Carleton, of Gary. In 19] Judge Greenlee married Jeanette Smith 
of Elwood, Indiana. 

He is a republican in politics, and has long been active in fraternal 
affairs, especially in Masonry. His affiliations are with the Blue Lodge, 
with the Knight Templar Commandery, the Scottish Rite degree up to 
and including the thirty-second, and the Mystic Shrine. He is also affil- 
iated with the Knights of Pythias, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

Judge Lawrence Becker. Judge of the Superior Court of Lake 
County, Lawrence Becker has been prominent as a lawyer and citizen at 
Hammond for the past eighteen years. Judge Becker represents the best 
quality of judicial character, and in his official capacity has set some high 
standards of service for his successors in that office to follow. 

Lawrence Becker was born August 10, 1869, in the Village of Fin- 
nentrop, Westphalia, Germany. When he was nine years old, or in May, 
1879, the family arrived at the little village of Tolleston, which is now 
included within the larger industrial City of Gary, but in August of 
the same year the family moved to Hammond, where they lived until 
May, 1883. The Beckers then went West and found a home in the State 
of Montana. In these various moves Lawrence Becker shared, and the 
education begun in the schools of Germany was continued at Hammond, 
m the State of Montana, and after arriving at manhood he returned to 
the East and spent the year 1892-93 in the Valparaiso Normal College, 
and in 1894 entered the law department of that institution. After gradu- 
ating in 1896 he came to Hammond and opened his law office. 

His public record needs no comment and is of itself a high tribute 
to his efficiency as a lawyer and judge and his public spirit as a citizen. 
He was elected in 1898 city attorney of Hammond and discharged the 
duties of that office until September, 1902. In May, 1904, he was elected 
mayor of Hammond, and was re-elected in November, 1905, and in 1909. 
His administration as mayor was one of great material progress in Ham- 
mond, and it was with keen regret that the citizens learned of his resig- 
nation in March, 1911. In 1912 Judge Becker was a delegate from the 




Q/cujnjZA**!-*-^ (7i$^&7&4s- 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 629 

Tenth Congressional District to the National Democratic Convention, 
and in that convention was the Indiana representative on the committee 
on rules. He supported the interests of President Wilson on the ques- 
tion of abolishing the unit rule and also on seating Wilson delegates 
whose seats were contested, and worked to have the Indiana delegation 
go to Wilson when there was no chance of Governor Marshall receiving 
the nomination. The resignation of Judge Becker as mayor of Ham- 
mond was the result of Governor Marshall offering him the appointment 
as judge of the Superior Court of Lake County, and since taking up 
those duties he has made this court an impartial tribunal and one in 
which efficiency and expedition are as characteristic as its unvarying 
justice. 

Judge Becker was one of the principal organizers of the Hammond 
Public Library, and when the organization of the board was completed 
in 1903 he accepted a membership on appointment from Hon. Willis C. 
McMahon, judge of the Lake County Circuit Court. He has been a mem- 
ber of the library board ever since. On September 3, 1898, Judge Becker 
married Miss Agnes Eaton. They are the parents of three children. 

James Chester Gibbs, M. D. Since 1888 continuously engaged in 
the practice of his profession at Crown Point, Doctor! Gibbs is one of the 
oldest and best known medical practitioners in Lake County. To the 
large practice which he serves, he has brought the ability and careful skill 
which would have gained him perhaps more distinction, but not greater 
honor for substantial service in the populous urban centers. Doctor 
Gibbs is a graduate of the homeopathic school of medicine, and has also 
gained a reputation for special training and skill in several branches of 
.medicine and surgery. 

James Chester Gibbs was born in Kalamazoo County, Michigan, March 
10, 1856. His parents, Jacob B. and Eleanor (Dunn) Gibbs were farm- 
ing people and Doctor Gibbs spent most of his youth on a farm, attended 
the public schools, and after finishing the high school course in the City 
of Kalamazoo pursued his education in the University of Michigan, 
which graduated him B. A. in 1883. Doctor Gibbs is a graduate with the 
class of 1886 from the Chicago Homeopathic Medical College. The fol- 
lowing year was spent in practice at Crown Point, but he then returned 
to Chicago and for a year and a half was an interne in the dispensary and 
hospital. Since 1888 his general practice has absorbed all his time. 
Doctor Gibbs has prominent relations with the medical fraternity, be- 
longs to the Lake County Medical Society, the Indiana State Medical 
Association, the American Medical Association, the Illinois Homeopathic 
Medical Association, the American Association of Orificial Surgeons, and 
the American Association for the Study of Spondylotherapy. 

Doctor Gibbs is treasurer of the Crown Point Building and Loan 
Association. He has taken the chapter degrees in Masonry, and belongs 
to tin- National Geographic Society. Mrs. Gibbs, who before her mar- 
riage was Mattie A. Dresser, is one of the influential women in local 
society, was formerly a teacher in the Crown Point public schools, and is 
active in the Women's Study Club. Doctor and Mrs. Gibbs were married 
in 1891, and Mrs. Gibbs is a daughter of Lewis Dresser, a former Crown 
Point merchant. 

Rev. H. A. Hoerstman. As pastor of St. Edward's Catholic Church 
at Lowell, Father Hoerstman has for the past four years directed a pros- 



630 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

perous and flourishing parish, which has been in existence as a religious 
institution at Lowell for more than forty years. 

Lowell was first visited by Father F. X. Deimel, the Crown Point 
pastor, and mass was said in the private home of John Driscoll. The 
church may be said to have existed since 1870. The site was selected by 
Bishop Luers, who donated $100 for the purpose, and under his direction 
a small frame building was erected at a cost of $500 and was dedicated 
by the bishop in person in 1870. At that time the Catholic population of 
Lowell comprised only seven or eight families, and the increase was slow 
until 1878. It was conducted as a mission to Klaasville, and visited by 
Father John H. Bathe until 1882. In that time a cemetery site was se- 
cured at a cost of $250. The next priest was Rev. Charles A. Ganzer, who 
remained until 1891, and the mission was then attended a short time by 
Rev. Adam Buchheit from Klaasville. From 1891 to 1898 Lowell was 
attended by the fathers from the Most Precious Blood Church near 
Rensselaer. The present church edifice was erected by Father F. X. 
Schalk at a cost of $5,000, and the building was dedicated by Bishop 
Rademacher in 1897. In September, 1898, Lowell received its first resi- 
dent pastor in Rev. Frederick Koenig, who also had two missions. Father 
Koenig in 1898 built the rectory at a cost of $2,500. When he was trans- 
ferred in 1905 to Lottoville, his successor was Rev. Charles F. Keyser. 
and from 1907 to June, 1910, the resident pastor was Rev. Alphonse 
Mueller. Father Hoerstman has been in charge of St. Edward's Parish 
since June, 1910. 

H. A. Hoerstman was born at Delphos, Ohio, July 26, 1882, a son of 
Benjamin and Mary Hoerstman, the former aged fifty-eight and the 
latter fifty-three. There are two sisters, Mary and Rolena, and three 
brothers, Bernard, Alexius and Vincent. Father Hoerstman. the oldest 
of the children, acquired his early education in the parochial schools of 
Ohio, and after the removal of the family in 1893 to Mishawaka, Indiana, 
continued in school there until the age of fourteen. His college studies 
were pursued in St. Joseph's College, until graduating in the classical 
course in 1893, and then for five years he prepared for his work at Mount 
St. Mary's Seminary at Cincinnati. Father Hoerstman was ordained at 
Fort Wayne, May 22, 1908, by Bishop Alerding, and for the following 
four years was assistant at St. Joseph's Church in Logansport, and since 
then has had charge of the St. Edward's Parish at Lowell. Father 
Hoerstman has done much to build up the interests of his church, has 
placed it out of debt, and the parish now has forty-five families or nearly 
two hundred souls, with about fifty children. On August 27th the church 
and school was destroyed by fire and Father Hoerstman, at the cost of 
$12,000, is erecting a new brick structure which will be a combination 
church and school building and will be ready for occupancy about 
January 1, 1915. 

Judge W. C. McMahan. As judge of the Lake County Circuit Court, 
Judge McMahan fills a place of distinction and important public service 
in this section of Indiana. He has been identified with the bar of Lake 
County for thirty years, and twelve years of this time have been spent 
on the bench. His record of service clessifies him as a fine type of the 
modern judge, and he has long been noted for his expeditious handling 
of the business of his court, and his fairness in treatment of attorneys 
and his impartiality of decisions have again and again been commended 
by both the bar and the general public. 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 631 

Willis C. McMahan was born in Carroll County, Indiana, August 2, 
1858, the oldest of six children born to Robert and Martha (White) 
McMahan. The ancestry is Scotch-Irish, and the judge's grandfather, 
Robert McMahan, was an Indian trader and served as aide de camp to 
General Washington. Later he became a pioneer at the old town of 
Chillicothe, Ohio, and lived there during the Indian wars. Robert 
McMahan, the father of Judge McMahan, was born in Darke County, 
Ohio, moved with his parents when a boy to Tippecanoe County, Indiana, 
was reared on a farm and during the early days of that section of the 
state. For many years he was one of the substantial and well known 
farmers of Carroll County, and reached a venerable age. He was twice 
married, having one son by his first wife, and four sons and two daugh- 
ters by the second. His second wife's father, Zenas White, settled in 
Carroll County, Indiana, in 1832. 

Judge McMahan is a product of the Indiana rural district, growing 
up on a farm and attending country schools. He was a student in the 
Normal School at Ladoga, Indiana, for a time and spent' four years as a 
teacher. In preparation for his profession he spent a year in the Univer- 
sity of Michigan, read law with a firm in Logansport, and in 1883 was 
admitted to the bar at Delphi in Carroll County. Since April, 1884, 
Judge McMahan has had his home and professional business at Crown 
Point. He practiced there with a rising reputation, and his services have 
been almost constantly in demand for some public responsibility. Six- 
teen years were spent in the office of town attorney, he was prosecuting 
attorney of the county from 1890 to 1894, and in January, 1892, came 
his appointment to the office of circuit judge, and in the fall of the same 
year he had his first election to that office. Since then his service as judge 
has been continuous. Judge McMahan is a republican in politics, and is 
a member of the Knights of Pythias. In 1888 he married Miss Irene 
Allman, daughter of Amos and Mary (Luther) Allman. She was born 
in Crown Point. There are four children : Claudia, Mary, Maurine and 
Robert, 

Champion Rivet Company. A rivet is one of the familiar and useful 
objects, used in some form or other in almost every type of building and 
machine construction, but the average person would not be likely to re- 
gard as the basis for a highly specialized industry. The sole product of 
the Champion Rivet Company is rivets, in all commercial sorts and sizes, 
and their business is now one of the features of the East Chicago indus- 
trial district. The headquarters of the company are at Cleveland, Ohio, 
and the branch plant was established at East Chicago in 1912, the factory 
beginning operations on September 1, 1913. The site is 1,200 by 500 feet, 
and the buildings are modern and thoroughly equipped. About fifty 
men are employed, half of them skilled labor. The plant has a capacity 
of sixty tons of rivets per day, and automatic machinery is employed, 
driven by electric power. The output goes all over the West. 

C. C. Shelden, superintendent of the East Chicago plant, was born in 
Cleveland, Ohio, in 1881, and after leaving the public schools learned 
the trade of machinist. He worked as foreman or superintendent in a 
number of shops, and has been with the Champion Rivet Company for 
the past four years as superintendent. Mr. Shelden is married. He 
lives in East Chicago, and is affiliated with the East Chicago Club, the 
Commercial Club and the Knights of the Maccabees. His company has 
membership in the Safety First Association of East Chicago. 



632 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

W. C. Quincy, M. D. For the past eighteen years the name of Dr. W. 
C. Quincy has been increasingly identified with the best principles of 
medical and surgical science in Lake County, and among many of the 
longest established and most conservative families of Lowell his skill, 
resources and sympathetic nature have come to be regarded as indispen- 
sable. While the record of the capable physician is often little known 
outside of the community of his own patients, a service of eighteen years 
in one locality finds recognition in the gratitude of many individuals for 
their restoration to health and happiness. Devoted to the best ideals of 
his calling, Doctor Quincy has the zeal which recognizes no limitations 
in his work and the thirst for further knowledge that has led him fre- 
quently into the ever-widening fields of research. Descended from New 
England ancestors he has many of their sterling attributes and at all 
times has worthily represented the honored family whose name he bears. 

Doctor Quincy was born at Burlington, Vermont, in 1848, and in 
Rutland County, that state, attended the preparatory and academic de- 
partments of the noted Troy Conference Academy. At the age of twelve 
he moved to Orleans County, and grew to manhood in the Town of Lowell. 
His father had been a teacher in the Troy Conference Academy, was also 
a bookkeeper and later a farmer. For a number of years the boy assisted 
his father in the numerous duties pertaining to farm work, but through- 
out never gave up his ambition to enter the field of medicine, and with 
this end in view studied constantly. At the age of thirty-five he began 
to devote all his time to medical work, and in 1888 went to Chicago for 
the purpose of completing his training. Entering Bennett Medical Col- 
lege, formerly one of the noted schools of medicine of that city, he was 
graduated in 1889, in the last class to leave the old building on State 
Street. After his graduation Dr. Quincy practiced 3 1 /. years at Wau- 
conda, Illinois, returned to Chicago in 1893, taking a course in the Post 
Graduate School, on the West Side. He then practiced in that city until 
1896. That year saw his advent in Lowell, which has since been the scene 
of his labors and success. Since coming to Lowell Doctor Quincy has 
built up an excellent professional business. He is a member of the 
Indiana State Eclectic Society and the National Eclectic Medical Associ- 
ation, and also holds membership in the newly organized Health Officers 
Association. His fraternal connection is with the Modern Woodmen of 
America. In all civic and public movements Doctor Quincy has taken 
an active and interested part, and can be depended upon to contribute 
of his time, energy and means in behalf of movements making for better 
education, better morals and better citizenship. 

Doctor Quincy married Miss Mary A. Owen, who was educated at 
Coventry, Vermont. When she died in 1911 many of Lowell's poor 
mourned the loss of one who had frequently befriended and aided them. 
The doctor's two oldest children died in infancy. The one living child, 
Donald 0., born in Chicago eighteen years ago, was for a time a tele- 
graph operator and is now a student in Purdue University. 

C. Matson. The people of Whiting who are not directly familiar 
with the name of Mr. Matson have long recognized the purity and high 
quality of the products that are supplied to the community through the 
industry of which he is the head and chief factor. Mr. Matson, as 
was his father before him, is an expert dairyman, and has one of the 
largest establishments in Northern Indiana for the handling of milk and 
its products. He supplies the city with pure milk, and has a plant for the 




C. MATSON. DAIRY PLANT AND ICE CREAM MANUFACTORY 




J$JudMn^ d 4 *^ CfccUMsU^ 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 633 

manufacture of ice cream, a commodity that goes out to the trade under 
a recognized label and with unexcelled quality. 

C. Matson was born in Christiania, Norway, March 20, 1878, a son 
of Anton and Carrie Matson. The family emigrated to America in 1880, 
when Mr. Matson was two years of age, lived in Chicago until 1885, then 
moved to Hegewiseh, Illinois, and from there to Whiting in the spring 
of 1893. Anton Matson brought to Whiting an equipment of two cows 
which was the nucleus of the large dairy that subsequently grew up 
under his management and was conducted under the name "Five 
Brothers Dairy" beginning in 1893. In 1896 the business was moved to 
Wilcox, a suburb of Whiting, at which time the herd had increased to 
thirty-three. In 1896 thirty-three more cows were added, and the head- 
quarters were near East Chicago for one year. In 1897 the father sold 
out and returned to Whiting, and engaged in the buying and selling of 
milk, finally retiring altogether. 

In 1908 Mr. C. Matson resumed the business in which he had been 
trained, and began dealing in milk and dairy products and the manufac- 
ture of ice cream. At the present' time he handles thirty-five cans of milk 
each day, and his plant has a capacity of 400 gallons of ice cream 
daily. The establishment is located at 410 Indiana Boulevard, and 
the building and machinery, all of the latest type, represent an invest- 
ment of about twenty -five thousand dollars. 

Mr. Matson was married April 23, 1903, to Josephine Biesen. Her 
father, Joseph Biesen, came to Whiting in 1890, and has since been con- 
nected with the Standard Oil Company. Mr. Matson and wife have one 
daughter, Elizabeth, now in her eleventh year. Fraternally he is affili- 
ated with the Elks and the Knights of Columbus, with his family wor- 
ships in the Sacred Heart Catholic Church, and in politics is independent. 

George J. Hoevet. A Lowell business man, who has had varied ex- 
perience in training in business affairs in Chicago, as a practical farmer, 
and now one of the foremost merchants of the town, George J. Hoevet 
has contributed his enterprise in various ways to the commercial up- 
building and improvement of this section of Lake County. 

Born on a farm in Kankakee County, Illinois, November 12, 1870, 
he is a son of Mathias and Mary Hoevet, both of whom now live in Lowell, 
the former at the age of sixty-nine and the latter at sixty. There are 
three sisters and six brothers living. Ed P. lives in Lowell and is in the 
employ of the International Harvester Company. Otto looks after his 
father's farm. Herman is connected with the International Harvester 
Company at Mason City, Iowa. Albert is a farmer at Triumph, Minne- 
sota. Engelhardt is a farmer at Wells, Minnesota. The oldest daugh- 
ter, Thekla, lives on a farm at Tenstrike, Minnesota. Malinda lives on 
her father's farm in Illinois. Marie lives in Lowell and M. H. is con- 
nected with the Wilbur Lumber Company at Lowell. 

George J. Hoevet acquired his education chiefly in the country 
schools, up to the age of sixteen, and took both academic and business 
courses for two years in the Valparaiso University. Then followed two 
years of commercial experience in Chicago in connection with the grocery 
trade, and for three years he conducted a grocery business on North 
Wells Street, finally selling out to his partner, and coming to Lowell 
entered the employ of E. R. Lynch, an old groceryman. In 1896 Mr. 
Hoevet returned to Kankakee County, and for nine years was success- 
fullv engaged in farming on his father's estate. His return to Lowell in 
voi. n— i i 



634 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET EEGION 

1905 introduced him permanently to local business affairs. He bought 
out the business conducted by his old employer, Mr. Lynch, and now has 
a nourishing mercantile establishment, conducted in a store 50 by 80 feet, 
with basement and a part of an upper floor. The business requires the 
services of five employes. 

On February 21, 1896, Mr. Hoevet married Emma Selk, of Grant 
Park, Illinois. She was educated in Grant Park, and is an active factor 
in the Ladies ' Aid Society of the Methodist Church at Lowell. They are 
the parents of two children : Violet, aged fourteen, is now in high school ; 
and Pearl, aged twelve, is attending the grammar school. 

In July, 1911, Mr. Hoevet was elected a member of the Lowell school 
board, and since then has bent his efforts toward improving in every pos- 
sible way school facilities. Among other improvements there has been 
installed a heating and toilet system, and at the present time plans are 
being matured to establish a joint high school, and it is expected that 
within a few months the bonds for the new school will be sold. Mr. 
Hoevet also served as chief of the fire department at Lowell for three 
years, and while his time is well taken up with his private business he is 
always ready to perform his share of public duties. In politics he is a 
progressive. Fraternally his connections are with the Masons, Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias, and he has held 
office in the two bodies. Outside of his store, Mr. Hoevet is best known 
in the business community as president of the Cedar Valley Creamery 
Company, one of the most successful enterprises of its kind in Northern 
Indiana. It ships to different markets a butter well known in hundreds 
of households under the name "Cedar Valley Butter," and the trade 
now requires the full capacity of the creamery. 

Wisconsin Lumber Company. This company, handling lumber, 
building material and poles, was established in East Chicago in 1904, 
succeeding the former establishment of Mr. "Wilkerson, who started in 
business there in 1902. The officers of the company are S. O. Knudson, 
president, and AV. L. Craig, secretary and treasurer. The company was 
incorporated in Indiana in 1904. The plant is located at Tod Avenue 
and the tracks of the Baltimore & Ohio Chicago Terminal Railway, and 
occupies grounds 240 by 620 feet. About twenty-five men are employed, 
a force which indicates the extent of the supplies handled and the big 
business transacted by the firm. 

AV. L. Craig was born in Chicago in 1863, a son of John Craig, who 
settled in Chicago in 1851 and was a contractor. Educated in Chicago, 
Mr. Craig got his early experience in the lumber trade in Chicago, sub- 
sequently was located at Pontiac, Illinois, and has been in business at 
East Chicago since 1904. Air. Craig married Aurora F. Arnold of 
Chicago, and has one son, Allen, who is in the oil business in Kansas and 
Oklahoma. Air. Craig is affiliated with the lodge and chapter of the 
Alasonic order, belongs to the Presbyterian Church, and is a republican. 

AVilliam Graver Tank Works. The first important industrial con- 
cern in East Chicago was what is now the AVilliam Graver Tank Works, 
a flourishing industry employing a large number of workmen, with a 
continuous and prosperous business record extending over twenty-five 
years, and manufacturing commodities that are sold all over the world. 

William Graver, the founder of the business, was born in Pennsyl- 
vania of German descent, learned the trade of mechanic and became a 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 635 

tank builder and in 1857 started a small shop with his brother Michael at 
Pittsburg. In 1872 he became sole proprietor of the business and in 
1884 moved west to Chicago, then in 1886 moved his plant to Lima, Ohio, 
and came to East Chicago in June, 1888. The business was incorporated 
in 1888 under its present title, William Graver Tank Works. William 
Graver is president and treasurer; J. P. Graver is secretary; W. F. 
Graver, vice president; and P. S. Graver, general manager; A. M. 
Graver, purchasing agent; and H. S. Graver, sales manager. These latter 
are all sons of the founder of the business, have learned it in detail from 
bottom to top, and are capable young business men who have extended 
the industry along all lines and made it one of the most important in 
East Chicago. 

The plant occupies ten acres of ground and when running at full 
capacity employs about two hundred and twenty-five workmen. The out- 
put comprises steel plate work of every kind, but particularly steel tanks, 
smoke stacks, gas holders, ear tanks, complete oil refining apparatus, and 
a line of water softeners known as the Bartlett-Graver, which soften and 
purify water used for making ice without the expense of the distillation 
process, for laundries, boiler plants, textile mills, hotels, etc. In 1912 
the works put out many thousand tons of finished material, and the plant 
now has added new buildings and equipment, which doubles its previous 
capacity. 

J. P. Graver is secretary of the Safety First Association of East 
Chicago and Indiana Harbor, and a member of the Indiana Harbor Com- 
mercial Club. The sons of H. S. and A. M. Graver are both graduates 
of the University of Michigan, the former as civil engineer and the latter 
as mechanical engineer. William, Sr., J. P., and P. S. Graver are mem- 
bers of the Masonic order, having taken the Knights Templar degrees 
and are also members of the Mystic Shrine. 

Abe Ottenheimer. Probably no member of the East Chicago bar 
has a better position in that community than Abe Ottenheimer, who re- 
cently retired from long service as city attorney of East Chicago. Of 
broad experience and fine capabilities, he has won on merit every 
advancement from the time he started in life as a clerk, and now has 
his time and energies completely absorbed by his large practice. 

Mr. Ottenheimer is one of the few citizens in the Calumet region who 
claim Arkansas as their native state. He was born in Little Rock, the 
capital of that state, September 1, 1868, a son of Daniel and Sally Otten- 
heimer. His father is a retired merchant and his mother is now deceased. 
As a young man Abe Ottenheimer, after finishing his public school work, 
was engaged in the furniture business at Hammond, Indiana, from 1893 
to 1897. During that time he took up the study, of law under J. G. 
Ibach, who is now judge of the Appellate Court. After his admission 
to the bar in 1899, Mr. Ottenheimer practiced for two years as a member 
of the Hammond bar, and in 1901 established an office in East Chicago. 
His ability as a lawyer brought him soon into notice in that community, 
and in 1903 he was first appointed city attorney, and served until 1905. 
In January, 1910, he was again called back to office, the duties of which 
had in the meantime greatly increased, and his capable service contin- 
ued until the beginning of 1914. 

Mr. Ottenheimer was married February 24, 1892, to Minnie Unger, 
of Chicago. They have a son, Lester, now twenty years of age and a 
young man of exceptional brilliance, whose future is promising. He is 



636 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

a graduate of the East Chicago High School, attended the State Univer- 
sity at Bloomington, and is now in the law department of the North- 
western University at Chicago. Mr. Ottenheimer has made a record in 
oratory, and 1913 was awarded the gold medal prize in Lake County, 
and also has several trophies for his athletic prowess. 

Mr. Abe Ottenheimer is active in fraternal affairs, is a past master 
of East Chicago Lodge No. 595, A. F. & A. M., also a member of the 
Royal Arch Chapter; is past exalted ruler of the East Chicago Lodge of 
Elks No. 981 ; is past worthy president of the Fraternal Order of Eagles; 
and a member of the Loyal Order of Moose. 

East Chicago Garage and Sales Company. This is one of the best 
equipped and best managed concerns of its kind in the Calumet district, 
and was established under the above title on April 1, 1914. It previously 
was conducted as the J. P. Lewis Garage, which in turn succeeded the 
East Chicago Transfer & Express Company, which Mr. Lewis has man- 
aged for some time. After W. L. Spencer had bought an interest in the 
business with Air. Lewis in April, 1914, the company was organized 
under the title already stated. The company has a well located garage 
and storeroom, occupying space 60 by 142 feet, supplies garage service 
and also all the equipment for automobiles, and operates an automobile 
livery. 

J. P. Lewis was born in Knightsville, Indiana, August 16, 1871, and 
from a career begun as a common laborer has made himself one of the 
independent business men of the Calumet district. With a public school 
education, he found his first work in steel mills, came to East Chicago 
in 1901, and was with the mills there, and in 1908 bought out the Smith 
& Clapper Teaming Company. Later he organized the East Chicago 
Transfer Company, and the progress of his business enterprise since 
then has already been noted. 

Mr. Lewis was married September 25, 1895, to Lulu P. Redus, of 
Centralia, Illinois. They are the parents of three children, Paul, Lillian 
and Lyle. Mr. Lewis is a member of the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, and the Lodge and Chapter of Masonry and in politics is 
a republican. 

L. Clark Wood. During the past six years, covering practically the 
entire history of Gary, many of the largest subdivisions and real estate 
deals have been handled through L. Clark Wood, whose record in this 
field of business is one of unquestioned success. His early experience 
was acquired in the City of Chicago, and from his office in that city he 
began operating in Gary property soon after the establishment of the 
town. Mr. Wood did not start in the real "estate business with capital, 
and not even with an influential clientele. What every business man 
recognizes as '"nerve" and good judgment has been the chief factors in 
taking him so far in this line of enterprise, and his friends say that he 
has practically never failed to estimate properly the value of fixture 
developments and has timed his deals and investments with a nicety 
which almost invariably have resulted in profit. 

L. Clark Wood was born in Douglas County, Illinois, in 1874, a son 
of F. II. and Hulda II. Wood. His father, who was a farmer, came from 
Ohio to Illinois. Mr. Wood while growing up in the country in Illinois 
attended the district schools, and finished his education with a course 
in the Normal College at Danville, Indiana. His experiences and environ- 




=^2^^ 




LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 637 

ment were those of the farm until he was twenty-two years of age. In 
1896 he went to Chicago and soon had his first taste of real estate. Dur- 
ing the following ten years he laid the foundation for his success in that 
city, handled a large amount of property in Chicago and vicinity, and 
in 1907 hegan operating in Gary. lie moved his office from Chicago to 
Gary in 1908, and lias since taken a leading part in real estate develop- 
ment in this city. 

The additions and subdivisions which have been exploited by Mr. 
Wood in Gary are chiefly the following. Central Park Addition, Novem- 
ber 3, 1909, which Mr. Wood bought and re-sold, comprising one hundred 
and sixty lots at 17th and 2nd Avenue; the Gary Security Company's 
First Addition, comprising nine acres between 19th Avenue and Main 
Street, which he put on in 1910. On January 24, 1911, he bought the 
holdings of the United States Land Company, consisting of Douglas 
Park, two hundred lots on 25th Avenue and Van Buren Street. All 
told Mr. Wood has handled over two thousand lots in Gary, and still has 
two hundred and fifty left. Besides this he has acted as broker in many 
deals, has two hundred lots in East Chicago and a hundred lots in Ham- 
mond. Mr. Wood is president and treasurer of the Gary Security Com- 
pany and most of his operations have been carried on through that cor- 
porate organization. The Hartwell building, a structure 90x125 feet, 
is the property of Mr. Wood. Fraternally his affiliations are with the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, he is a member of the Gary 
Commercial Club and the Young Men's Christian Association. 

Allman-Gary Title Company. A record of long and consecutive 
growth and success is the history of the Allman-Gary Title Company. 
It has not always existed under its present title, as a matter of course, 
but the nucleus of the present business was started in 1859 at Crown 
Point by Amos Allman. The business was then known as Amos Allman 
& Son. In 1889 its title was changed to Allman Bros., and in 1S95 to 
Allman Bros. & Dinwiddie. In 1910 occurred the consolidation of this 
old Crown Point enterprise with the Gary Title and Abstract Company, 
and since then the name Allman-Gary Title Company has been in use. 
The officers at the present time comprise not only Lake County business 
men of prominence but also from Chicago, where the president of the 
company, A. R. Marriott, vice president of the Chicago Title and Trust 
Company, resides. The other officials of the company are : David 
Maney, vice president and treasurer, of Crown Point; Claud W. Allman, 
vice president, of Crown Point; Elmer Dinwiddie, secretary, of Crown 
Point ; and Harold Eckstorm, who is manager of the Gary office. The 
company performs all the service of a title and abstract organization, 
guaranteeing and investigating titles, drawing up such, and the extent 
of its business is indicated by the fact that more than forty thousand 
three hundred abstracts covering Lake County property have been 
drawn through this company's offices. 

At Gary the company occupy a building of their own at 656 Broad- 
way, 25 by 100 feet in dimensions. 

The Gary manager of this company, Harold Eckstorm, is a Chicagoan 
by birth, and was educated for the profession of mechanical engineer, but 
some seven or eight years ago became identified with the Chicago Title 
and Trust Company and was sent to Gary to take charge of the present 
business. His birth occurred in 1883, and his parents are Paul F. and 
Karen P. Eckstorm. His father is connected with the wholesale grocery 



638 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

business in Chicago. Mr. Eekstorm finished his education in the Univer- 
sity of Illinois in the mechanical engineering department, worked in the 
line of his profession for the Chicago & North Western Railway Com- 
pany, and later was in the building and contracting business for a time. 
In 1906 he became an employe of the Chicago Title and Trust Company, 
soon got into good standing as an official worker and skillful manager, 
and the confidence entertained by his superiors in his ability resulted in 
his coming to Gary to ta"ke charge of the local office of the Allman-Gary 
Title Company in*1910. 

Mr. Eekstorm in 1912 married Maude Coover of Gary. Fraternally 
he is affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, has 
taken the Knights Templar degree in Masonry and is a member of the 
Mystic Shrine, belongs to the Gary Commercial Club and the University 
Club, and his college associations were with the Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
and the Theta Nu Epsilon fraternity. 

J. Glenn Harris is the senior member of the firm of Harris & Ress- 
ler, which is one of the strongest combinations of legal talent in the City 
of Gary. He is well trained in his profession and has acquired a broad 
experience both in general office practice and court work. 

Mr. Harris is a native of Indiana, born in Carroll County, November 
27, 1882, where he lived with his parents, Samuel E. and Mary Harris, 
until he finished high school. He taught school in his home county for 
four years, after which he entered the Indiana Law School at Indianap- 
olis, where he graduated in 1907. He came to Gary June 10th of the 
same year, and since that time has been a member of the Gary bar in 
active practice. 

He is a member of a number of clubs and fraternal orders, including 
Thirty-second Degree Masons, Mystic Shrine, and Elks. 

Gary State Bank. Henry G. Hay, Jr. The Gary State Bank, the 
depositary of the steel company and other corporations, was established 
for business in its present location March 4, 1898. The bank organiza- 
tion is really as old as Gary itself, but the present square and substantial 
house, with its handsome gray stone exterior, was not completed for 
occupancy until early in 1908. It occupies a location in the very heart 
of the business district, the corner of Broadway and Fifth Avenue. The 
first organization was by officers of the Indiana Steel Company and 
Judge E. H. Gary of the steel corporation. According to a recent report, 
the Gary State Bank has capital of $100,000, surplus and undivided 
profits of more than $40,000, deposits of practically a million and a 
half dollars. The total resources aggregate $1,602,889.06. 

The officers and directors of the Gary State Bank are: H. G. Hay, 
Jr., president; J. B. Bailey, cashier; E. J. Buffington, Ralph Van Vech- 
ten, G. G. Thorp, K. K. Knapp and H. G. Hay, Jr. The officers and 
directors have been the same since the opening of the bank with the ex- 
ception of T. P. Philips, who recently died in California ; and A. B. 
Keller, who recently resigned his post as cashier and went with the Inter- 
national Harvester Company. Mr. Bailey, the present cashier, was 
formerly with the Continental Commercial National Bank of Chicago. 

Henry G. Hay, Jr., president of the Gary State Bank, is a banker 
with a number of years' practical experience, and is a western man and 
a graduate in law. 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 639 

lie was born at Cheyenne, Wyoming, June 30, 1876, a son of Henry 
G. and Ella 0. (Bullock) Hay. His father went to Wyoming from 
Indiana in 1868 and the mother went to the same place in 1874. Henry 
G. Hay, Sr., was for many years prominent in business and public affairs 
in Wyoming, served several terms as state treasurer, was a rancher and 
stockman, president of the Stockgrowers National Bank of Cheyenne, 
and since 1903 has been assistant treasurer of the United States Steel 
Company. 

The junior Hay grew up in Wyoming, had a public school education, 
and in 1896 graduated from the law department of the University of 
Michigan. He became interested in banking in Cheyenne, and rose to 
the position of assistant cashier of the Stockgrowers National Bank. His 
home has been in Gary since December 17, 1906, so that he is one of the 
pioneers, and has been identified with the financial interests of Gary 
since the beginning, and president of the Gary State Bank since its doors 
opened for business. 

Mr. Hay was married in 1907 to Bessie Gourlie of Cheyenne, Wyom- 
ing. They have two children. Mr. Hay is a thirty-second degree Mason 
and a member of the Shrine, also affiliates with the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. In politics he is independent. 

W. J. Rooda. In the retail shopping district of Gary the name 
Rooda has for about five years stood for quality merchandise and deal- 
ings in the jewelry trade. Mr. Rooda is one of the more enterprising 
young merchants of the city, and deserves success because he has quali- 
fied himself for it. 

A native of Holland, born in 1884, W. J. Rooda is a son of J. W. and 
Susan Rooda, who emigrated to the United States and located in Chicago 
in 1891. It was in Chicago that W. J. Rooda received his public school 
education, and early became an apprentice and learned the jewelry 
trade. On May 18, 1909, he moved to Gary and opened a stock of jewelry 
at 521 Broadway, and has since been steadily prospering. 

In September, 1905. he married Jean Henry, of Chicago, and they 
have two children, Ellen and John. Mr. Rooda affiliates with the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of the Maccabees, is a 
member of the Presbyterian Church, and in politics is independent. 

James B. Bailey. As a growing financial and industrial center, 
Gary has attracted to the important executive positions in the local 
sphere of business many capable men from larger cities and larger insti- 
tutions, and one of the recent comers is James B. Bailey, now cashier of 
the Gary State Bank. Mr. Bailey entered upon his duties after more 
than a quarter century's experience in one of Chicago's largest and best 
known institutions. 

James B. Bailey was born at Ottawa, Illinois, November 15, 1867. 
With a public school education in Chicago, where he was reared, on 
January 4, 1886, when eighteen years old, he began his experience in the 
banking business with the Commercial National Bank. He was with 
that institution, in various grades of service and responsibility, until 
August 31, 1913, and was then appointed cashier of the Gary State Bank 
as successor to Mr. A. B. Keller, who had been the first cashier. 

Mr. Bailey in 1889 married Julia M. Kelly, of Chicago. They have 
four children, and the family have moved to Gary and all are now iden- 
tified with the social community. Mr. Bailey is a member of the Cath- 



640 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

olic church and affiliated with the Knights of Columbus. In politics he 
is independent. 

Mark M. Miller. As Gary is one of the most cosmopolitan cities in 
America, it is only natural that men of foreign birth and training in 
many instances have found places of leadership and large influence in 
business and in public affairs. 

One of the successful younger business men of the city is Mark M. 
Miller, associated with Andrew Volesko in the real estate business. Mark 
M. Miller, like his partner in business, is a native of Hungary, where he 
was born September 7, 1882, a son of Nathan and Jessie Miller. He was 
reared and spent his early manhood in his native land, and in 1906 came 
to America, spending a short time in New York City, thence going to 
Chicago, and from there to Gary in the latter part of 1907. Since arriv- 
ing in this city he has been associated with Mr. A r olesko in real estate, 
and the two have built up a large business. 

Mr. Miller was married in September, 1912, to Elinor Brust, who 
was also of Hungary. Mr. Miller has membership in the Commercial 
Club and the University Club of Gary, affiliates with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and in politics is a progressive. 

Paul E. Schubich. The Builders' Hardware Company of Gary has 
had a prosperous commercial record since it was established in May, 
1909. The business was founded by William S. Gallagher and William 
J. Williams, and since June, 1910, has been under the active manage- 
ment of Paul E. Schubich. There are few business houses in Gary 
which have a better class of trade, better credit, and none which offer a 
more reliable service to the community than the Builders' Hardware 
Company. The store is located at 706 Broadway in a building 25x85 
feet with basement, and a complete line of builders ', shelf and household 
hardware is carried, in such assortment as to satisfy all the demands of 
the local trade. 

One of the successful young business men of Gary, Paul E. Schubich 
has been identified with the hardware business since early youth. Born 
in Algoma, Wisconsin, April 25, 1882, a son of Edward F. and Othelia 
Schubich, the father being a furniture merchant, Paul E. Schubich grew 
up in Wisconsin, graduated from the high school, and in 1901, when 
nineteen years of age, went to Chicago and secured his business training 
with one of the largest hardware houses in the country, the Ilibbard, 
Spencer & Bartlett Company. It was as a stock boy and minor clerk 
that he gained his first experience with that great house, and continued 
in its service for eight years, in which time he had been progressively 
advanced, and for six months traveled on the road selling the goods of 
the company to the retail trade. With this experience Mr. Schubich 
came to Gary in 1910 to become manager of the Builders' Hardware 
Company. 

Mr. Schubich was married June 12, 1913, to Wilna Gallagher, 
daughter of William S. Gallagher, one of Gary's leading business men. 

Emmet N. White. A lawyer by profession, and with a large expe- 
rience in business and official affairs, Emmet N. White is now serving 
Gary in the office of city comptroller, and was previously police com- 
missioner of the city. He was one of the early lawyers to locate in this 
growing industrial metropolis, and has for a number of years held a 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 641 

secure place in the regard of the community as well as in his chosen 
vocation. 

Emmet N. White is a native of Virginia, born in that state Septem- 
ber 24, 1879, a son of John G. and Nora (Carter) White. His father 
was a farmer, and the son grew up in the country of old Virginia, fin- 
ished his course in the public schools and during the first years of his 
manhood, from 1899 to 1904, was in the southwest, and served as pur- 
chasing agent for the American Smelting and Refining Company of 
El Paso, Texas. Returning home, he then entered the University of 
Virginia, and studied law until graduating from the law department in 
1908. In the same year he was admitted to the Virginia bar, and ar- 
rived at Gary in July of the same year. He was admitted to the Indiana 
bar in 1909, and has practiced ever since so far as his official duties 
would permit. Mr. White is a member of the firm of Seabright & White. 
For two years he served as police commissioner of Gary, and in 
November, 1912, was appointed to the office of city comptroller. 

On June 20, 1913, Mr. White married Helen Robins at Gary, a 
daughter of William A. and Helen W. Robins, formerly of Cheyenne, 
Wyoming. Mr. White is secretary and vestryman in Christ's Episcopal 
Church of Gary. In politics he is a democrat, and one of the local lead- 
ers in that party. Besides his own residence, he owns considerable 
property, all of which represents his accumulations since taking up the 
practice of law. 

Frank L. Welsheimer. A Gary lawyer of exceptional equipment 
and success in his practice, Frank L. Welsheimer has been a member of 
the Indiana bar for more than twenty years, and moved his practice to 
Gary about six years ago. 

Born on the farm in Allen County, Indiana, June 28, 1864, Frank 
L. Welsheimer is a son of Ludwig and Elizabeth Welsheimer. Though 
reared in the country, he had his ambitions even when a boy, and re- 
solved to fit himself for a career of usefulness among the world's work- 
ers. It was largely through his own earnings that he paid his way 
through the higher courses of education, and in 1892 was graduated 
from the law department of the University of Michigan. For a number 
of years he practiced with an office at Auburn, Indiana, and enjoyed an 
increasing general practice in the courts and in office, and for two terms 
served as prosecuting attorney of DeKalb and Steuben counties from 
1903 to 1907. As the result of his experience and his many other quali- 
fications Mr. Welsheimer has been successful from the beginning of his 
practice at Gary, in which city he located on June 2, 1908. 

On June 27, 1895, was celebrated his marriage with Eveline A. 
Johns, of Columbia City, Indiana. They have one child, Mildred, fifteen 
years old. Mr. Welsheimer is a republican in politics, belongs to the 
Methodist Church and is affiliated with the Masonic order. 

Dr. R. C. Stamper. President of the Gary Dental Society, Doctor 
Stamper is one of the most skillful workers in his profession in the Cal- 
umet region, and at the same time a genial gentleman who has made 
hosts of friends in several communities. 

He was born January 18, 1881, in Kentucky, a son of C. M. and 
Melissa (Martin) Stamper. His father was a teacher for many years. 
Doctor Stamper received a fair education in the public schools, and is 
a graduate of the Ohio College of Dental Surgery, having been gradu- 



642 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

ated in May, 1906. His practice was in the cities of Indianapolis and 
Paducah, Kentucky, until 1909, when he came to the City of Gary and 
has since successfully established himself. He is a member of the Gary, 
the Lake County, the Chicago Dental societies, and his professional asso- 
ciates at Gary have honored him with the office of president of the local 
society. 

In May, 1911, Doctor Stamper married Ethel Webb, and they have 
one daughter, Mary Elizabeth. The family are Methodists and in 
polities the doctor is republican. 

Joseph C. TracEiY who is in charge of the Postal Savings System 
of the Gary postoffice, and since 1913 assistant postmaster, has spent 
practically his entire active career in the postal service. It is unusual 
when a department of the Federal Government affords a field for a 
permanent career, and Mr. Tracey is one of the comparatively few 
men who have been identified with the postoffice department in different 
parts of the country through more than twenty years. 

Born at Cleveland, Ohio, in 1868, a son of P. J. and Margaret Tracey, 
Joseph C. Tracey was educated in the parochial schools and in St. Mary's 
College at Dayton, Ohio. After some early experiences in different 
lines, in 1892 he was made an employe in the postal service at Cleve- 
land, and remained in that city until 1904. That year the postoffice 
department appointed him to the foreign service in the Philippine 
Islands, where he spent five years in the military branch of the post- 
office department at Manila and in the southern islands. On returning 
home Mr. Tracey came through the Suez Canal, through Europe, and 
by way of New York. His home has been in Gary since 1910, and he has 
been one of the efficient members of the local postoffice staff. 

Martin James Smith. Though one of the younger members of the 
Lake County bar, Martin James Smith has come in for a generous share 
of professional business and distinctions of the law and local business 
affairs. He has the honor of being the first city attorney when Crown 
Point passed from its town grade into its existence as a city on June 6th, 
1911. 

Born on a farm at Morrisville in Dane County, Wisconsin, December 
9, 1878, Mr. Smith grew up in the rural district not far from the City 
of Madison, had an environment that was neither poverty nor affluence, 
and worked his way through college and has depended upon his own 
efforts for advancement in affairs. His parents were John and Mary 
( Butler) Smith, substantial farming people in Dane County. The dis- 
trict schools furnished him his first education, and after working to 
acquire the means he spent one year in the law department of the Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin, and then transferred to the Valparaiso University and 
was graduated LL.B. in 1907. His first practical experience as a lawyer 
was in Hammond, but after a short time he moved to Crown Point in 
1908, and has since enjoyed a good general practice in the comity seat. 
In 1914, after the organization of the second city administration he was 
again elected city attorney of Crown Point, having come to that office 
after four years of service from January 1, 1909 to 1913 as deputy 
prosecuting attorney of Lake County. He has framed the various fran- 
chises, ordinances, and contracts which have furnished the basis for 
public improvements and various public utilities of Crown Point. Mr. 




%a^t^Q/Z^^ 




LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 643 

Smith is a member of the Crown Point Chamber of Commerce, the Lake 
County Bar Association, and is a director and attorney for the People's 
Fuel Gas Company of Crown Point. 

On November 4, 1911, Mr. Smith married Julia Hughes of Chicago. 

Gustave S. "Widholm. A lawyer, one of the early members of his 
profession to locate at Gary, Gustave S. Widholm has practiced in that 
city for seven years, and though still in his early thirties, has estab- 
lished an excellent practice, and has a splendid future before him. 

Though a native of Sweden, where he was born in 1881, his home 
has been in America since childhood and he is a product of American 
schools and institutions. His parents, Gustave and Augusta Widholm, 
emigrated to the United States in 1865, and after two years' residence 
in Pennsylvania moved out to Illinois in 1887 where the father became 
a farmer in the vicinity of Kankakee. With his early boyhood spent 
in the country, Gustave S. Widholm made the best use of his opportu- 
nities, attended the public schools, later the Hoopeston Academy, and 
took the scientific course and studied law at Valparaiso University. 
Admitted to the bar in 1907, he began practice at Gary in September of 
the same year, and aside from two years as a member of the firm of 
Curtis, Widholm & Slick, has had an office to himself, and has done 
exceedingly well in his profession. 

On February 4, 1911, Mr. Widholm married Ruth Wallenberg, of 
Chicago, and they are the parents of one son. Fraternally he affiliates 
with the Masonic order, is a member of the Gary Commercial Club, and 
in politics is a progressive republican. 

, Simon Bros. The enterprise of the Simon Bros, has left its mark 
in a number of ways in the Calumet region during the past ten years. 
They have been well known in business since they opened a stock of 
jewelry at South Chicago on September 6, 1902, and on May 1, 1910, 
expanded their business scope by establishing a similar store in the City 
of Garj r . The proprietors are Charles J. and Lewis Simon, and the 
elder brother is still active manager of the South Chicago branch of the 
business, while Lewis is one of the live and enterprising merchants and 
citizens of Gary. During 1911 a drug store was conducted in the same 
building with the jewelry establishment, but on August 1, 1912, they 
moved the stock of drugs to the corner of Eighth and Broadway, and 
there have one of the best drug stores in the city. The Simon Bros, re- 
modeled at an expense of $30,000 the Paine Building in Gary, which is 
one of the landmarks in the business district. Another enterprise con- 
ducted by them is the Grand Theater, which was started as a stock com- 
pany and vaudeville house, but is now exclusively devoted to moving 
pictures. Both the Simon Bros, are natives of Chicago, and sons of 
Joseph Simon, a retired contractor, who has at different times acquired 
interests in real estate. Lewis Simon was born in Chicago, November 
22, 1885, and was trained both in school and by practical experience for 
a business career. When he was sixteen years old he joined his brother 
Charles in business, and his success has come from a steady concentra- 
tion of effort along one line. Mr. Lewis Simon affiliates with the Benev- 
olent and Protective Order of Elks and the Masonic order, the Knights 
of Pythias and the Loyal Order of Moose, and belongs to the Gary Com- 
mercial Club, and in politics maintains an independent attitude. 



644 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

International Trust & Savings Bank op Gary. The International 
Trust & Savings Bank of Gary was granted a charter under the laws of 
Indiana in June, 1913, and its doors were opened for business on July 
1 of that year, in the Servia Building at 800 Broadway. With a capital 
stock of $60,000, the International Trust & Savings Bank has excep- 
tional facilities for varied and important service to the community. 
Along with good service both to business and individuals, the company 
has emphasized the principle of ''safety first," and every safeguard has 
been provided to insure absolute security of all funds entrusted to the 
keeping of this organization. Under its charter it is both a banking and 
trust company, and offers facilities for the execution of a wide variety 
of trusts, including powers as agent or attorney, as trustee, as treasurer, 
as custodian, as depositary, as assignee or receiver, as executor or ad- 
ministrator under wills, and in the management of estates. The com- 
pany also have a mortgage department, making first mortgage loans on 
real estate, and a considerable sum of money has already been placed 
through this company, on individual home buildings, and every conven- 
ience in this direction is afforded consistent with conservative and 
sound banking methods. The company also provides the facilities of 
general banking and a savings department, with interest at 3 per cent 
on savings deposits. The organizers of the International Trust & Sav- 
ings Bank are chiefly LaPorte men. The leader is John W. Albright, 
now president of the bank, who was formerly from LaPorte. but for ■a 
number of years had a broad and varied experience as a commercial 
salesman traveling for the wholesale dry goods houses, and later as a 
banker and business man in Illinois. Besides Mr. Albright, the other 
officers are : Gallus J. Bader, vice president ; Charles D. Davidson, 
secretary treasurer; Joseph M. Stephenson, cashier; Edward F. Stock, 
manager of the foreign exchange department; John W. Niemiec, book- 
keeper; and John O. Bowers, attorney for the board. The directors 
are: Gallus J. Bader, Fred J. Smith, Rome C. Stephenson, John O. 
Bowers, Julius Szudzinski, Charles D. Davidson and John W. Albright. 
Mr. Bader and Fred J. Smith have long been identified with hanking 
affairs in Northern Indiana and in the Calumet region. Mr. Bader is 
president of the First National Bank of East Chicago, and of the Indi- 
ana Harbor National Bank, of the First State Bank of Tolleston, is inter- 
ested in several banks at LaPorte, and his home is in Whiting. Mr. 
Stephenson is vice president of the St. Joseph Loan & Trust Company 
of South Bend. Thus the character of the officials and directors is of 
itself a high guarantee of the company's management, and in the few 
months since it was established the business has grown beyond all expec- 
tation. 

John W. Albright was born in 1869, at LaPorte, Indiana, and grew 
up in that city and attended the public schools. In 1890, going to 
Chicago, he became an employe in the Marshall Field & Company 
wholesale dry goods department, and for eight years represented that 
house on the road. Seven years following were spent as commercial 
salesman for the Rice-Stix Dry Goods Company of St. Louis, and Mr. 
Albright then engaged in the retail dry goods business at Beardstown, 
Illinois. He was a director and the organizer of the Beardstown State 
Bank, and previously had assisted in the organization of the Alton Bank- 
ing and Trust Company at Alton. His interests in Southern Illinois 
were sold out in January, 1913, and he then came to Gary and perfected 
the organization of the International Trust. & Savings Bank. Both Mr. 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 645 

Bader and Mr. Smith were boyhood friends of Mr. Albright in LaPorte. 
In July, 1898, Mr. Albright married Elizabeth Louise Kuhl of 
Beardstown, a daughter of George S. Kuhl, a dry goods merchant of 
that city. They have two daughters: Catherine, aged twelve years, 
and Marjorie, aged five. Mr. Albright has taken thirty-two degrees 
in Scottish Rite Masonry, also the Knight Templar degrees, belongs to 
the Mystic Shrine, and also has membership with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks. He attends worship in the Congregational Church, and in politics 
is non-partisan. 

0. S. McGinnity. The president of the Condit & McGinnity Realty 
Company, a sketch of which organization and its chief activities is 
presented elsewhere in this work, has been longer in the real-estate 
business at Gary than any other independent operator, and his busi- 
ness activities have contributed in no small degree to the extension and 
upbuilding of this remarkable industrial city. 

0. S. McGinnity was born in Mineral Point, Wisconsin, in 1875. 
His parents, James and Catherine (Carroll) McGinnity, are now liv- 
ing retired in Wisconsin. A public school education prepared Mr. 
McGinnity for his business career, and for three years he was a travel- 
ing salesman for a wholesale lumber firm. In 1903 he moved to Chi- 
cago and engaged in real-estate, and from there, in October 1906, came 
to Gary. He was one of the first independent operators at Gary, and 
his keen judgment of possibilities and future development, his enthusi- 
asm for the growing community, and his steady energy and resourceful- 
ness have been factors which have brought him more than ordinary 
success. 

In October, 1908, Mr. McGinnity married Catherine E. Rogan of 
Chicago, and they are the parents of one daughter. The family are 
members of the Catholic Church, and in politics he is independent. 

Condit & McGinnity. Probably no other real-estate firm of Gary 
has developed more property and contributed more to the upbuilding 
of the residence quarters of the city than that of Condit & McGinnity. 
Thejr are likewise one of the oldest in their line at Gary, the business 
having been started in October, 1906, very shortly after population 
began to collect around the mills and other activities which constituted 
the original Gary. The business was a partnership from October, 1906, 
until January 14, 1909, and was then incorporated with the following 
officers: O. S. McGinnity, president; G. P. Condit, secretary and treas- 
urer; and E. S. Condit, vice president. Since then the only change in 
the personnel of the firm has been R. P. Condit who has become vice 
president. 

The list of activities of the firm in the last eight years would be 
too long for complete description, but in that time it has opened up the 
following well known subdivisions: Grant Park Addition, Second 
Grant Park Addition, Third Grant Park Addition; South Park Addi- 
tion; the Condit & McGinnity Subdivision; the Condit & McGinnity 
Sixth Addition ; the Condit & McGinnity Seventh Addition. In August, 
1912, the Condit-MeGinnity Contracting Company was formed for the 
purpose of building homes on unimproved property. Since then a large 
number of houses, especially for workingmen, have been erected by this 



646 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

firm, and they have built and sold the homes on such terms that they 
cost to the purchasers less than the same houses could be rented. 

G. P. Condit, the secretary of this firm, was born at Centralia, Illi- 
nois, and has been in active business since his early manhood. His 
early education was acquired in the public schools at Centralia and in 
the St. John's Military School. In 1904 he was engaged in the hard- 
ware business in Chicago, and remained in that line until 1908, since 
which year his home and business activities have been at Gary. 

His father, E. S. Condit, was born at Centralia, Illinois, in 1858. 
For a number of years he was prominent in that city as a banker, hav- 
ing founded the Merchants State Bank and was prominent in its man- 
agement until 1904, when he moved to Chicago and engaged in the real- 
estate business. He was one of the first men on the ground at Gary in 
1906, and has since continued the management of interests, both in 
Gary and in Chicago. E. S. Condit married Rena P. Pullen of Cen- 
tralia, who still lives in Chicago. 

Mr. G. P. Condit was married in 1912, to Alice Worden of Fort 
Wayne, Indiana. He is a member of the University Club of Gary. 
In all the years of the corporation at Gary, and in the many hundred 
contractions negotiated through its offices, the firm has never been obliged 
to resort to a law suit, and has made only one foreclosure, a record which 
is the highest evidence of its fairness and liberality and one of the 
chief reasons for its continued success. 

F. W. Clinton. Lake County's citizenship contains few members 
whose careers have illustrated so well the varied battle which fortune and 
with circumstances as that of F. W. Clinton, mention of whose name at 
once suggests prosperous business and civic relations with the community 
at East Chicago. Mr. Clinton has well earned all that he has ever ac- 
quired, and though twice compelled to start at the foot of the ladder, he 
has now climbed apparently beyond the reach of misfortune. 

F. W. Clinton was born in Kalamazoo, Michigan, May 9, 1855. His 
parents were Eli and Katherine Clinton, his father a pioneer farmer of 
Michigan, who in 1864 moved to Lake County, Indiana, settling near 
Hobart, where the remainder of his years were spent. He was one of the 
active members of the Republican party. 

F. W. Clinton had a public school education, and between the age 
of seventeen and twenty learned the carpenter's trade. Moving to Crown 
Point in 1875, he engaged in the. contracting business for nine years, and 
then was employed three years in a wood-working mill at South Chicago. 
His next location was at Ainsworth, Indiana, where he bought a general 
store but sold out in 1888 and opened one of the early grocery stores in 
East Chicago. It was in fact the first grocery store that supplied 
comestibles to the inhabitants of that community. Its location was at 
4808 Oleott Avenue. He was gaining steadily in prosperity, when as 
one of the incidents of the hard times of 1893 he suffered bankruptcy 
in 1894. He had erected a large building, and on account of hard times 
was unable to secure the money needed for deferred payments, and in 
the end both the building and his business had to be sacrificed. It is an 
interesting fact that Mr. Clinton now owns the building which involved 
him so heavily twenty years ago. 

After varied experiences in providing for his family, Mr. Clinton 
in 1902 borrowed $57 in order to start a second-hand store, and in 1903 
took in a partner who brought $1,500 capital, and together they opened a 






w/^1 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 647 

stock of hardware. In 1904 Mr. Clinton was able to buy out his partner, 
paying $3,200 for an interest which the preceding year was capitalized 
at $1,500. Since that time Mr. Clinton has continued in the hardware 
business with the assistance of his son. In 1908 he established a ten cent 
store in East Chicago, and opened a plumbing shop in 1909. In 1912 his 
son, Royal, who had been associated with him in business, took over the 
plumbing shop and ten cent store at a valuation of $6,000, and now con- 
ducts them independently. Earl Clinton, another son, is now associated 
with his father in the hardware business. This stock runs at a value 
of about twelve thousand dollars, and Mr. Clinton also has valuable hold- 
ings in local real estate. 

In 1875 Mr. Clinton married Elizabeth Hutton, daughter of Levi 
Hutton, one of the old settlers of Lake County. Their six children are : 
George, a resident of East Chicago ; William ; Alice, deceased ; Earl, his 
father 's associate ; Royal, whose place as a business man has already been 
indicated ; and Grace, deceased wife of Clarence Eder of Hammond. 

Mr. Clinton has been active in fraternal and political affairs, was 
city treasurer of East Chicago in 1894, is an active progressive in politics, 
and his name appeared on the first ticket of that party in 1912 for the 
office of county treasurer, and in 1914 was again a candidate for the 
same office and on the same party ticket. Mr. Clinton has the Lodge 
and Chapter degrees in Masonry, is affiliated with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and is a member of the East Chicago Club. 

Dr. J. II. Long. The first dentist to open an office at Gary was 
Dr. J. H. Long, who is dean of the profession and has prospered in pro- 
portion to the length of his service in that city. 

Doctor Long is a native of Canada, born in 1882, a son of Henry M. 
and Anna Long. His father was a lumberman, and in 1887 moved his 
family to Menominee on the northern peninsula of Michigan. It was 
in that part of the country that Doctor Long grew up, received his early 
training, and after he had reached manhood worked to secure the means 
to enable him to take a course in dentistry. His three years as a student 
in the Northwestern University School of Dentistry were concluded with 
his graduation in 1907. Doctor Long almost at once came to Gary, and 
opened his office in that city on August 25, 1907. The prestige which 
came to him as the first dentist has been maintained in the city of 40,000 
people, and his practice long since reached a volume which has absorbed 
all his professional time and energy. 

Doctor Long is a member of the Indiana State Dental Society, the 
Northern Indiana Dental Society, the Chicago Dental Society, the Lake 
County Dental Society and the Gary Dental Society. He was president 
of the county society for two years ending in July, 1913, and was the 
first president of the Gary Society which Avas organized in November, 
1907, with only four members, and he held the office for one year. 

Dr. Long was married January 1, 1912, to Edna Johnson, of Toma- 
hawk, Wisconsin. Fraternally the doctor is affiliated with the Masonic 
order, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Gary Com- 
mercial Club, the University Club, is a republican in politics, but has 
allied himself with the citizens party in the fight for good local govern- 
ment, and in religion is a Presbyterian. 

C. Keller Wallace. A valued and ambitious citizen of East Chi- 
cago, who has won a high place in his profession as civil engineer, C. 



648 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

Keller Wallace has been concerned with much important work and his 
services are especially appreciated as city engineer of East Chicago 
during the last five years, and had active management of the epoch- 
making improvements taken and carried to a successful conclusion dur- 
ing the administration of Mayor Schlicker. 

Kansas is the native state of C. Keller Wallace, where he was born 
July 25, 1882, a son of T. M. and Eleonora (Keller) Wallace. His 
father was for many years a merchant and engaged in the hardware 
business in Ohio. The father took up his residence in Ohio when his 
son was a small boy, and it was in Hardin County of that state that 
C. Keller Wallace spent his youth and after the public schools attended 
the Ohio Mechanic Institute at Cincinnati. His technical training in 
civil and mechanical engineering was received at Cincinnati, and his first 
important experience was as deputy county surveyor of Hardin County 
during 1905 and up to August, 1907. At the latter date, Mr. AVallace 
established his home in East Chicago, where the Chicago, Lake Shore 
& South Bend Railway employed his services up to April, 1909. At 
that date began his public relations with the city as city engineer, and 
the record of his activities since that time can be read in the miles of 
street paving, sidewalk construction, sewer improvement, and the many 
other directions in which municipal growth and enterprise have mani- 
fested themselves. Mr. Wallace is an expert in his particular profes- 
sion, a man of absolute integrity, and enjoys a high place in the com- 
munity. 

On August 17, 1907, Mr. Wallace married Rose E. Simpson of Mount 
Victory, Ohio. Mr. Wallace in polities is a republican. 

Edwin Nelson Canine. The schools of the Calumet region are a 
source of pride to every citizen. This region has not progressed more 
rapidly industrially than in educational facilities, and the field has 
attracted some of the ablest men now to be found anywhere in school 
management. The East Chicago school system, since 1905, has been 
under the executive direction of Edwin N. Canine, and the remarkable 
extension of the school service in that city in the last ten years is largely 
a monument to his energy and ability. School work has been his pro- 
fession since he paid his tuition through normal school by teaching 
a roomful of country boys and girls, and he has kept his own proficiency 
up to the increasing demands of his growing responsibilities. 

Edwin Nelson Canine was born at Waveband, Indiana, in 1868, a son 
of William R. and Margaret (McCord) Canine. His father was a farm- 
er, and the son spent his early years in a rural atmosphere until called 
to a more important work as a teacher. After his early training, he 
was granted a certificate and taught district schools several terms in 
order to pay his way through the Indiana State Normal School, from 
which he graduated in 1891. After that for four years he was princi- 
pal of the schools at Flora, Indiana, for three years he was at Green- 
wood in the same state, and in 1901 graduated from the University of 
Indiana with the degree A. B., and had also done some work towards 
his degree of Master of Arts. The several years following his gradua- 
tion from the state university were spent as principal of the high school 
at Gas City until 1901, when he came to East Chicago to become prin- 
cipal of the high school in that city. In 1905 the school board made 
him superintendent of the entire city system- 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 649 

Some comparative statistics will indicate his growing responsibilities 
and the many improvements made at East Chicago in the past ten years. 
When he first took charge of the school in that city he had thirty-five 
teachers under him. At the present time the corps of instructors num- 
bers 115 teachers. At the same time three large and modern school build- 
ings have been erected, and all of these were planned by Superintendent 
Canine. During his first year the highest salary paid to a grade teacher 
was $52.50 a month and salaries for the same class of teacher now rise 
as high as $90 a month. 

Mr. Canine in 1894 married Nannie C. Lucas of Brazil, Indiana. 
They have a son, Ralph, who is now in his first year in the medical 
department of the Northwestern University of Chicago, and a daugh- 
ter, Margaret, attending Indiana University. 

Superintendent Canine is of an old and distinguished American fam- 
ily, originally of Dutch ancestry. His great-grandfather, Ralph Canine, 
moved from Kentucky in 1821, and became one of the early settlers 
in Montgomery County, Indiana, taking up Government land. One of 
the farms entered by this pioneer near the old homestead is now owned 
by Professor Canine, and is valuable, both as agricultural property and 
also for its family associations. This pioneer Indiana settler was the 
son of Peter Canine, who enlisted at Philadelphia and saw active serv- 
ice in the War of the American Revolution. On the strength of this 
ancestor's record, Mr. Canine is a member of the order of the Sons of 
the American Revolution. Since he was twenty-one years of age he 
has been affiliated with the Knights of Pythias, and has held all the 
chairs in the lodge; is a Royal Arch Mason; is independent in politics, 
and a member of the Congregational Church. While his chief work in 
East Chicago has been as an educator, he has interested himself in allied 
movements for the social welfare. He has served as president of the 
Associated Charities since its organization, and is a member and chair- 
man of the educational committee of the East Chicago Commercial 
Club. 

Central Investment and Realty Company. An important com- 
mercial service has been rendered to the community of East Chicago and 
vicinity through the Central Investment and Realty Company, which 
has been in existence for the past five years, and has not only handled 
in the usual manner real estate on a brokerage business, insurance, 
negotiated loans, but has also undertaken independent development and 
building activity in the city. 

This company was organized in 1909, and the organizers were Peter 
W. Meyn, Giles T. Warner, George W. Lewis, who was the first secre- 
tary treasurer, and Reverend Mr. Lauer. Mr. Lewis and Reverend Mr. 
Lauer sold their interests in 1912, and were succeeded in the company 
by Joseph W. Dunsing and Julius Meyn. Mr. Dunsing is now secretary 
and treasurer, and G. T. Warner is president, At the present time the 
company is promoting a subdivision of 100 lots, located between One 
Hundred and Fiftieth and One Hundred and Fifty-first streets and 
Reading and Northcot streets. The real-estate holdings of this com- 
pany aggregate in value a quarter of a. million dollars, and are situated 
in various parts of East Chicago, but chiefly in the business district. 
The best office building in East Chicago, and one of the largest in the 
county, is the Calumet Building, constructed by this company in 1909, 



650 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

and its offices are located in that handsome structure. The company 
also put up in 1913 the Lyric Building. 

Joseph W. Dunsing, secretary and treasurer, was born in Strassburg, 
Illinois, in 1881, a son of Reverend Julius and AVilhelmina (Schnoeker) 
Dunsing. His father, a minister of the German Lutheran Church, 
moved to Wanatah, Indiana, where he had charge of a church, in 1891 
returned to Illinois and located at Clayton, and in 1894 was placed in 
charge of one of the large churches of Hammond. 

In these various localities Joseph W. Dunsing acquired a public 
school education and also had a course in business training, and his 
talent and industry have afforded him a progressive rise to independent 
position among the leading business men of his community. For sev- 
eral years Mr. Dunsing was connected with the G. H. Hammond Com- 
pany at Hammond, later with the Lake County Savings and Trust 
Company of that city until 1909, was in business at Gary until June, 
1912, and after six months of traveling salesmanship, became actively 
identified as secretary and treasurer of the Central Investment and 
Realty Company of East Chicago. 

Mr. Dunsing has had a part in local public affairs, and has the dis- 
tinction of having served as the first city comptroller after the incor- 
poration of Gary, holding that office for eight weeks. He is affiliated 
with the lodge and chapter of Masonry, the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, belongs to the East Chicago Club, the Commercial Club, 
the Gary Y. M. C. A., and in politics is a democrat. 

Samuel Herskovitz, M. D. Few American young men have gone 
farther in profession and business than Dr. Samuel Herskovitz. A poor 
immigrant fourteen years ago, he paid his way through school, prepared 
for his profession, made himself proficient in a special branch of medi- 
cine and surgery, and since locating at Indiana Harbor five years ago, 
has gained a practice that taxes his energies, is proprietor of two pharma- 
cies, and one of the prominent men of affairs in the city. 

Samuel Herskovitz was born in Roumania, one of the Balkan states, 
February 14, 1884, a son of Joseph L. and Pearl Herskovitz. His 
father died in his native country, and the widowed mother, since de- 
ceased, came with her children to the United States. Doctor Hersko- 
vitz attended the public schools in Roumania and was sixteen years old 
when he came to the United States in 1900. Here by hard work he con- 
tinued his education, and while employed in the daytime at wages of 
one or two dollars a week, spent his nights in study. Doctor Hers- 
kovitz received his professional training in the medical department 
of Washington University at St. Louis, from which he was graduated 
M. D. in 1908. After several months of practice in St. Louis, he took 
postgraduate work at Chicago in the diseases and treatment of the eye, 
ear, nose and throat, and with this thorough equipment for both gen- 
eral practice and his specialty, came to Indiana Harbor in March, 1909. 
The scope of his work soon broadened beyond the strict lines of his 
profession, and in 1910 he established the Calumet Drug Store, and in 
February, 1913, the Red Cross Pharmacy was opened under his pro- 
prietorship. These are now two of the best equipped and best known 
pharmacies in the city. 

Doctor Herskovitz has membership in the Lake County and the 
state medical societies, and the American Medical Association. On 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 651 

October 8, 1908, lie married Nettie D. Sachs of New York. Their three 
children are: Pearl, Joseph L., and Bernard. 

Doctor Herskovitz affiliates with the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, the Knights of Pythias, the I. 0. B. A., the Fraternal Order of 
Eagles, is a member of the Indiana Harbor Commercial Club, and in 
politics is republican. During 1912-13 he has given an important pub- 
lic service as secretary of the board of health of East Chicago. He is 
also secretary and director of the Twin City Sentinel. All these rela- 
tions and activities indicate his prominence as one of the leading young 
men of affairs in the Calumet region. 

The Standard Oil Company of Indiana. The progress of Whiting 
as an industrial center has been chiefly due to the establishment there 
of the great refineries of the Standard Oil Company. Its operations 
have touched the city at so many points that no account of Whiting 
could be written without frequent reference to the chief industrial 
institution, and at this point it is only necessary to group the more 
salient points concerning the company in the form of a brief sketch. 

The Whiting Standard Oil Company is an Indiana corporation, and 
construction work on the original plant was started in February, 1889, 
and operations of refining began in October, 1890. The grounds 
acquired by the company were 360 acres, and the great and complex 
plant, refineries, storage plants and warehouses, offices and other con- 
spicuous features of the industry now cover all of 428 acres. 

It would be impossible to enumerate in detail all the varied products 
of the Whiting plant. There are over a thousand brands of lubricat- 
ing oils, besides gasoline, illuminating oil, petroleum asphalt, wax, 
greases and candles, and a large catalog would be needed for even a 
brief description of its products. The raw material comes to Whiting 
through a pipe line from the different states of Oklahoma and Kansas, 
and about thirty-six thousand barrels per day are worked through the 
refineries. The capacity of the plant is about forty thousand barrels per 
day when cheaper products are made. During tbe construction of the 
plant the company employed 2,000 men, and in March, 1914, there were 
2,700 men on the payroll, 500 of whom were engaged in new construc- 
tion. The noted Owl Club of Whiting, which was established about 
twenty years ago by Mr. Burton, now vice president of the company, was 
designed as the social center for the company's employes in Whiting, 
and is now the largest and most popular club of the city. 

This company has its own docks and boats at Whiting, and also at 
Detroit, Marquette and Hancock in Michigan, and at Green Bay and 
Superior, Wisconsin. Branch establishments are found at Wood River, 
Illinois, at Sugar Creek in Missouri, and at Casper, Wyoming. During 
1913 the company transported by boat to its various stations refined oil 
and gasoline in an aggregate of over seventy-five million gallons. Besides 
the chief refinery at Whiting and the three branch establishments, the 
company maintains distributing stations in eleven different states of 
the union. 

Beaumont Parks, who is general superintendent of the Standard 
Oil Company at Whiting, was born in Cleveland, Ohio, December 25, 
1868, son of Joseph and Jane Parks, farming people. He was well 
educated, graduating in 1890 from the Western Reserve University at 
Cleveland, and on July 26, 1890, arrived at Whiting and found employ- 
ment as timekeeper over the workmen employed in the construction of 



652 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

the refining plant. Since then his employment has been continued, and 
his own ability has advanced him through nearly all the grades of 
service. He has served as foreman in most of the departments, and 
from the fall of 1904 until September, 1914, was assistant superin- 
tendent of the plant, when he was appointed general superintendent. 
Mr. Parks was married October 25, 1892, to Helen M. Ograin, of 
Cleveland. They have one son, Donald B., who is now taking a course 
in chemical engineering in the University of Wisconsin. Mr. Parks 
is affiliated with the Masonic Order, and member of the Hudson Chap- 
ter of the Alpha Delta. Phi (A A <J>). In polities he is a democrat. 
He is also a member of the Hammond Country Club, and was presi- 
dent six years of the Whiting Board of Education, and recently retired 
from the office of mayor of Whiting, his service having continued from 
January, 1910, to January, 1914. Having been identified with AVhiting 
since the beginning of its industrial importance, Mr. Parks has been 
successful in business, and has been able to serve and assist in the 
advancement of his community. 

Clahence C. Smith. That East Chicago has become one of the 
most thriving and enterprising industrial and commercial centers of the 
state is due to such men as Clarence C. Smith, who represents a pion- 
eer family in Lake County and who has been closely identified with 
business affairs in the Calumet region for many years. His efforts in 
advancing the material interests of the city are generally recognized, 
and his relationship with several real-estate and other business organi- 
zations has been fruitful in contributing to the present solid position 
of East Chicago. 

Clarence C. Smith was born at Mason, Michigan, October 5, 1863, 
of an old New York family. Gideon Smith, his father, was a native 
of New York, took up the trade of shoemaker, located in Michigan 
about 1862, and in 1864 established an early home in Lake County, 
Indiana, about one mile west of Deep River postoffice, where for some 
years he was associated with farming and also kept a small shop in his 
home for boots and shoes. Gideon Smith married Mrs. Anna L. (Marble) 
Ilanna, whose father, Simeon Marble, was a settler of the late '50s in 
Lake County. Mrs. Gideon Smith died about 1880, and her husband 
passed away in December, 1902, at East Chicago, aged eighty-two years. 
They had six children, three sons and three daughters. 

The early career of Clarence C. Smith was spent on a farm, most 
of his early recollections being associated with the old homestead west 
of Deep River. The district schools afforded him his educational advan- 
tages, ami his first regular employment was as a farmhand at monthly 
wages. At the age of twenty-one Mr. Smith ventured out into the 
broader avenues of life, learned telegraphy, and in 1885 was employed 
by the Pennsylvania Railway Company as an operator, a service con- 
tinued until 1889. In that year he was sent to East Chicago as assis- 
tant station agent, and in March, 1890, was appointed agent at Ham- 
mond. I lis relations with East Chicago have thus been of a pioneer 
character, since he was on the ground practically at the beginning of 
that now prosperous city, and in January, 1893, was appointed agent 
at East Chicago, and continued to represent the railway in that capacity 
until December 29, 1903. For several years after that Mr. Smith was 
a member of the firm of Smith & Clapper Bros., engaged in the livery 
and transfer business, and subsequently he became president of the 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 653 

East Chicago Transfer Company. His interests gradually broadened, 
and he gave active attention to the transfer company until selling out 
all his stock therein in January, 1914. 

Mr. Smith for several years had acted as agent for the East Chicago 
Company, and on April 15, 1906, opened an independent office for real 
estate, and has since been one of the largest operators in that field. Mr. 
Smith is president of the Smith-Miller Company, which was organized 
in 1910, for the object of building homes and selling them on easy 
payments. Its capital stock is $100,000, and since its organization two 
hundred or more houses have been constructed under its management 
and its capital, and most of them are high-class residences. The com- 
pany has also put up several large business blocks in Indiana Harbor. 
As president of the Indiana Harbor Realty Company, Mr. Smith is also 
known in that community. The Indiana Harbor Realty Company was 
organized in 1909 with a capital stock of $50,000, and it owns forty- 
two acres of ground on Kennedy Avenue between Indiana Harbor and 
East Chicago, and this is as yet only partly developed. Mr. Smith is 
treasurer of the East Chicago Land Association, which owns 107 lots, 
and that property is being rapidly developed, fifty houses having already 
been erected and sold. Other of his individual relations with the busi- 
ness community are as director of the First National Bank of East 
Chicago, as stockholder in the Northern States Life Insurance Com- 
pany. In the general insurance and real-estate field, Mr. Smith has for 
several years been regarded as one of the most important operators in 
East Chicago. His business headquarters are at 802 Chicago Avenue. 

Mr. Smith has not neglected his community obligations in spite of 
his growing burdens of private business. For six years he has served 
on the East Chicago School Board, and his name appears among the 
school officers on the cornerstone of six of East Chicago's school build- 
ings. He has membership in the Indiana Harbor and East Chicago 
Commercial Club, and in Masonry has taken both the Lodge and Chap- 
ter degrees. In politics he is a republican, and his church is the Con- 
gregational. 

On May 21, 1893, Mr. Smith married Miss Maude Holmes, daugh- 
ter of Milton D. and Helen (Turner) Holmes. The four children born 
to their marriage are: Leonard C, Beulah (deceased), Irene and Rol- 
land. 

Thomas Y. Richards. From the ranks of the industrial workers of 
East Chicago, Thomas Y. Richards was elevated to the position of city 
clerk at the election of November 4, 1913, and moved his office to the 
city hall and began his administration on January 5, 1914. Mr. Rich- 
ards became a worker in the iron and steel mills of Indiana when a 
boy, and has been identified with the great industries of East Chicago 
for nearly ten years. 

Born in the City of Indianapolis, July 22, 1874, Thomas Y. Rich- 
ards is a son of Robert Q. and Emma (Youtsey) Richards. His father 
has likewise followed the iron and steel industry for a long period of 
years, and since 1908 has been employed by the Green Engineering 
Company as special policeman. The early youth and the business career 
of Thomas Y. Richards began and were passed for a number of years 
in Muncie. He finished his education in the grammar and high schools 
there, and subsequently took a course in the Muncie Business College. 
As an employe in the iron works of that city he learned the occupation 



654 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

of weighman, became an expert in that line, and followed the industry 
of iron and steel working for seventeen years. It was in the Indiana 
Rolling Mill Company's plant at Muneie that he began his career in 
1893, and remained at Muneie until 1905, since which date he has been 
in East Chicago. His first relation was with the Interstate Iron & Steel 
Company and then with the Republic Iron & Steel Company. 

Well known and popular, both in labor circles and among all classes 
of citizens, Mr. Richards' election to the office of city clerk was an honor 
which he well deserved, and everyone recognizes his preeminent quali- 
fications for the responsible duties of his trust. In politics he is a pro- 
gressive republican. Mr. Richards has affiliations with the Improved 
Order of Red Men, the Junior Order of United American Mechanics, 
and the B. P. 0. E. In 1901 he married Fannie Nelson, who had been 
a schoolmate of his in Muneie. 

Joseph A. Meade. That part taken by Joseph A. Meade in the 
affairs of Northern Lake County has been that of an able and conscien- 
tious lawyer, whose affiliations have always been straightforward and 
honorable, and whose practice, of an extensive and important charac- 
ter, has brought him into connection rather with the common people 
than with the large corporate and wealthy clients. Mr. Meade is one 
of the popular members of the East Chicago bar, and has rendered many 
important services through his professional activities. 

Joseph A. Meade was born at Industry, Kansas, January 17, 1886. 
His parents were Nathan and Laura (Baker) Meade. His father, who 
was for some years a stockman in Kansas, finally returned to his original 
home state of Illinois, in 1888, locating at Marion, and there continued 
business as a stock breeder, buyer and seller. Two years of age when 
the family returned to Illinois, Joseph A. Meade grew up in that state, 
and had an education in the grammar and high schools, but has worked 
his own way to professional success and his tuition and living expenses 
while a student at Valparaiso University, where he took courses in law, 
oratory, and part of the curriculum leading up to the Bachelor of Science 
degree. Mr. Meade was admitted to the bar at Chicago, in 1908, and for 
several months had valuable experience in the office of Senator Wil- 
liam E. Mason of that city. Since August 18, 1908, his home has been 
in East Chicago, where his practice as a lawyer has been of increasing 
scope and influence. His work has led him more and more to special- 
ize in the line of real-estate, criminal and personal injury practice. In 
1913 Mr. Meade represented East Chicago at the Waterways Conven- 
tion in Washington, D. C. Probably more than any other local attor- 
ney, Mr. Meade appears as counsel and is retained in the interest of a 
large number of labor unions. He has a place on the membership com- 
mittee of the Lake County Bar Association. 

In October, 1912, Mr. Meade married Alberta J. Campbell, of Marion, 
Illinois. They have one child, Jackson Nathan Meade. Mr. Meade is 
chairman of the house committee of the East Chicago Elks Club, is 
president of the Fraternal Order of Eagles, and also has affiliations 
with the Knights of Pythias and the Loyal Order of Moose. He is one 
of the charter members of the East Chicago Commercial Club. A repub- 
lican in politics, he was chosen city chairman of the republican organiza- 
tion in 1914. Prosecuting Attorney Greenwald made him his deputy, 
and in 1910 prosecuting eighteen felonies, he made the remarkable rec- 
ord of securing seventeen convictions. 




^y%2f 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 655 

Walter L. Spencer. Though one of the younger business men of 
East Chicago, "Walter L. Spencer has had a long and varied experience, 
has been working since boyhood, has found his opportunities for inde- 
pendence, and is one of the best known citizens of East Chicago through 
has active relations with public affairs. 

Walter L. Spencer was born in Chicago, March 7, 1884, a son of 
Thomas A. and Mary Spencer. His father was a steel worker who moved 
to East Chicago, in 1892, when the steel mill was established there, and 
died April 11, 1912, while the mother is still living. There were four 
sons and four daughters in the family, and Walter was the fifth bora. 

With a public school education, he quit attending school at the age 
of thirteen, became an office boy in the Republic Iron & Steel Company, 
was soon promoted to timekeeper, worked in that capacity two years, 
and at the age of sixteen found a similar position with the Inland Iron 
Works. At the age of eighteen he found another line of work as deputy 
city treasurer, serving four years, then was deputy city clerk four years, 
and held the office of city clerk for a similiar period. Early in 1914, 
Mr. Spencer bought an interest in the garage, which had been conducted 
by J. P. Lewis, and together they organized the East Chicago Garage and 
Sales Company. 

On July 23, 1905, Mr. Spencer married Elizabeth E. Schwab, daugh- 
ter of John Schwab of Hammond. They have a daughter now six years 
of age named Eunice Marjorie. The family reside in East Chicago, 
where Mr. Spencer has affiliations with the Blue Lodge and Chapter 
of Masonry, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Com- 
mercial Club, and is well known and popular in both civic and social 
circles. He is a republican, and at the present time is a member of the 
board of school trustees. 

James Clements. A successful East Chicago merchant, who has 
built up a good business on the basis of his mechanical trade, thoroughly 
learned when a young man, James Clements now has one of the best 
hardware establishments in the city. 

Born at Mishawaka, Indiana, in 1875, he is a son of George and 
Emma Clements, his father a blacksmith. As a boy he learned the 
tinner's trade, brought his mechanical skill to East Chicago in 1896, 
and for several years was employed by the East Chicago Hardware 
Company. In 1900 he bought from this company its tinshop, and since 
then has been in business for himself. Mr. Clements did the tinwork 
on the first two important buildings erected at Indiana Harbor, the 
Harbor Hotel and the office of the Inland Steel Company. In 1906 he 
opened a hardware and tinshop on Olcott Avenue, and in 1911 moved to 
his present location at 4708 Forsyth Avenue. His store has a ground 
space of 20x85 feet, and he still maintains a tinshop on Olcott Avenue. 

Mr. Clements was married in 1904 to Minnie May McDonough of 
Mishawaka, Indiana. They have a young son, James Buford. Mr. Cle- 
ments is a republican, has affiliations with the lodge of the Masonic 
order, also the Royal Arch Chapter, the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

S. W. Ogden. Among the manufacturing concerns of the East Chi- 
cago district one of the largest and most important in contributing 
to the resources of the city and in giving the Calumet region publicity 
over the United States through the distribution of its goods is the 



656 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

Grasselli Chemical Works, further reference to which industry is found 
on other pages. The works are a branch of the central establishment 
at Cleveland, Ohio, and were started at East Chicago in 1892. The 
location of the plant is at Kennedy Avenue between 151st Street and 
the Calumet River, and the grounds contain four hundred acres. About 
five hundred and fifty people find employment at the works, and it can 
be easily seen that this contributes one of the largest siugle items to 
the prosperity of the community. The output of the Grasselli Chemi- 
cal Works are all kinds of heavy C. C. chemicals for both industrial, 
laboratory and medicinal purposes. The product is shipped to every 
state in the union. 

S. W. Ogden, who has been superintendent of the East Chicago works 
since May, 1902, came to this city from Olean, New York, and has his 
home in East Chicago. The family comprises two children, Willard L. 
and Dorothy A. Mr. Ogden is a republican, has affiliations with the 
Knights Templar Masonry, the Shrine, Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, the East Chicago Club, the Indiana Harbor Commercial 
Club, the Hammond Country Club and the Chicago Automobile Club. 
He is a director and vice president of the First Calumet Trust & Sav- 
ings Bank. 

Charles B. Donovan. Seldom has a public appointment been 
received with better general satisfaction than that of Charles B. Dono- 
van to the office of postmaster of East Chicago. Mr. Donovan has spent 
uearly all his life in East Chicago, has been known to the people as 
a hard-working and honorable young business man, and since the begin- 
ning of his service in the postoffice, has demonstrated his efficiency and 
competence for the responsibilities of his position. 

Charles B. Donovan was born in Chicago, April 26, 1880, a son of 
Charles B. and Emma Donovan. His father was an iron molder by 
trade, moved to East Chicago in 1892, and was for a number of years 
employed in one of the foundries there. Charles B. Donovan had a 
public school training, was for four years in the Grasselli Chemical 
Works, learned the trade of molder, and was assistant foreman for the 
Green Engineering Company at East Chicago until his appointment by 
President Wilson as postmster at East Chicago on July 1, 1913. 

Mr. Donovan is a loyal democrat, heartily in sympathy with the 
policies of the present administration, is a member of the Commercial 
Club, and has taken both lodge and chapter degrees in Masonry. In 
1903 he married Catherine Farrington of Chicago, and they are the 
parents of five children, three sons and two daughters : Charles B., Jr., 
Edward C, Florence G., Charlotte B., and Woodrow Wilson. 

C. M. Gillespie, M. D. Though one of the younger members of the 
Lake County medical fraternity, Doctor Gillespie has brought to the 
active work of medicine and surgery an exceptional equipment, gained 
both from the schools and from the resources of his own mind and adapt- 
ability for his chosen vocation. 

Dr. C. M. Gillespie is a native of Belfast, Ireland, born May 4, 1879, 
the son of a Presbyterian minister and missionary, Rev. Robert Gilles- 
pie, whose wife was Kate Waters. His father, who is now deceased, 
was for many years a missionary in India, and Doctor Gillespie lived 
in that country from 1881 until 1887, and then was sent back to Eng- 
land for his education. His early advantages were of a very superior 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 657 

nature, and besides his high school training in London, he was a stu- 
dent of medicine four years in Edinburgh University. Coining to the 
United States in 1904, Doctor Gillespie later took a course in the Ben- 
nett Medical College of Chicago, and received the M. D. degree in 1910. 
Doctor Gillespie did some of his first "professional practice at Whiting, 
but afterwards practiced six months in Wisconsin and a, year in Iowa. 
He returned to Whiting as his permanent location on April 1, 1913, 
and now has a large general practice. He is a member of the different 
medical societies, is a member of the Catholic Church, belongs to the 
Catholic Order of Foresters, and in politics is independent. On July 
4, 1910, Doctor Gillespie married Alexis Biesen of Whiting, daughter 
of James Biesen, who is connected with the Standard Oil Company 
there. 

First National Bank of East Chicago. In what is. known as the 
old town of East Chicago, the largest financial institution is the First 
National Bank, with a capital stock of $100,000, a surplus of more than 
$20,000, and $500,000 in deposits. Its total resources aggregate nearly 
$700,000. The First National Bank, which opened for business under 
that title February 9, 1905, succeeded to the business of the old Lake 
County State Bank. The bank owns the northeast corner of Chicago 
Avenue and Forsyth Street, a ground 75x150 feet, and a handsome 
bank house will in the near future be erected. The officers and direc- 
tors of the First National are: G. J. Bader, president; J. G. Allen, 
vice president; William J. Funkey, Jr., cashier; W. R. Diamond, Charles 
Johns, C. C. Smith, T. F. Donovan, directors. 

The financial experience of William J. Funkey, Jr., began before he 
became of age, and with several years of training in subordinate posi- 
tions in Chicago, he came to the Calumet district six years ago and has 
been an energetic factor in local banking. 

Born in the state of Ohio, in 1883, William J. Funkey is a son of 
William J. and Elizabeth (Schroeder) Funkey, his father a minister. 
His education was acquired chiefly in Parsons College at Fairfield, Iowa, 
and coming to Chicago in 1902, at the age of nineteen, he was employed 
in the Chicago Savings Bank and Trust Company, and with one or 
two other Chicago banks. Mr. Funkey has lived in the Calumet district 
since January 1908, when he became connected with the Indiana Har- 
bor State Bank, and was made cashier of the First National Bank of 
East Chicago in February, 1909. When Mr. Funkey first took up his 
duties with the First National its deposits were approximated one hun- 
dred and sixty-five thousand dollars, and since then they have almost 
tripled, being now over half a million. 

Mr. Funkey was married in 1908 to Eveline M. Packer, of Chicago. 
They are the parents of two children. Mr. Funkey affiliates with the 
Masonic Lodge and Royal Arch Chapter, belongs to the Congregational 
Church and is secretary of its board of trustees and has charge of the 
church music. Politically his attitude is independent. 

James J. Nejdl. As a general brick and paving contractor, Mr. 
Nejdl has been in the business at Whiting for ten years, and a conspic- 
uous fact that makes his business of interest to the public, is that he has 
performed most of the paving work done in Whiting during that time, 
and that amounts to saying that he has done most of the paving of the 
city, since that form of improvement was negligible up to ten or fifteen 



658 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

years ago. Mr. Nejdl has also made a name iu public affairs, and has 
served with the city council and also as postmaster. 

A native of Bohemia, James J. Nejdl was born November 24, 1874, 
a son of Martin and Catherine Nejdl. The family emigrated to America 
in 1879, and his father has been a contractor in Chicago for the past 
thirty-five years. The son received his education in the public schools 
of Chicago, and learned his trade with his father. His home has been 
in Whiting since 1896, and the first eight years were in the employment 
of the Standard Oil Company as a bricklayer. In 1904 he engaged in 
business for himself as a contractor, and now employs on the average 
through the season one hundred workmen. 

Mr. Nejdl was married July 3, 1895, to Mary Swatek of Chicago. 
To their marriage have been born three children, and the two living 
are Lambert and Daisy. Mr. Nejdl is affiliated with the Fraternal 
Order of Eagles and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and 
in politics is a republican. 

As to his public career, it should be mentioned Mr. Nejdl repre- 
sented the Third Ward in the city council following the granting of a 
city charter to Whiting. His service as postmaster was from 1908 to 
1913, and it is the consensus of opinion that the postal affairs were 
never better administered than under his capable direction. 

Peter J. Moser. The Moser Hardware Company is one of Whit- 
ing's stores that furnish real service to the people, and the city has no 
more enterprising business man than its active maanger, Peter J. Moser. 
The store is situated at the corner of White Oak and One Hundred 
and Ninteenth Street, where it has a thirty-five foot frontage, and since 
the Moser Bros, bought the old store of Allen Skellenger at Whiting, on 
June 1, 1910, they have more than doubled the stock, and another evi- 
dence of their success was the recent establishment of a new store at 
Robertsdale, a suburb of Hammond. The firm consists of Peter J. and 
Matthew Moser, and while the former looks after the Whiting store, 
his brother is manager of the Robertsdale branch. 

Peter J. Moser is a native of the Calumet district, born at Ham- 
mond, July 19, 1882, and is a son of the late Peter and Barbara Moser. 
His father, who was a contractor, died in 1913, and the mother is still 
living. Peter J. Moser, the third of their nine children, was reared 
at Hammond, attended the parochial schools and also the public high 
school, and at the age of sixteen began earning his own living and get- 
ting an experience to serve him in his independent career. Two years 
were spent in the employment of J. J. Ruff, and then for two years he 
was with the Lion Store at Hammond. T.ien followed two years with 
the H. Channon & Company in their wholesale hardware house in Chi- 
cago, and the firm then sent him on the road selling goods over a ter- 
ritory comprised within a radius of 500 miles about Chicago. Mr. 
Moser spent three years as a traveling salesman, and then engaged in 
the machine shop business at Hammond, with Daniel Brulin, but sold 
out a year later. In 1908 he was appointed record clerk in the lower 
house of the Legislature at Indianapolis, and spent nine months as 
clerk of the water department at Hammond. In 1909 he took charge of 
the Jones Dishwasher Company of Hammond. Resigning in 1910, he 
engaged in the hardware business, and his progress in that line has 
already been indicated. 




CJ^c^^L^^JC^Lc^h^. 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 659 

In 1910 Mr. Moser married Loretta Wolf of Indianapolis. Their 
two children are Richard and Margaret. Mr. Moser affiliates with the 
Knights of Columbus, the Catholic Order of Foresters and the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks, is a member of the Catholic Church 
and in politics is a democrat. 

RxVLeigh P. Hale, M. D. In East Chicago one of the physicians 
who can claim a patronage of exceptional numerical strength and value 
is Dr. Raleigh P. Hale, who has practiced here for the past five years, 
and while looking after a private practice of growing strength and im- 
portance has also served in several important public offices which have 
increased his reputation in the community. 

Raleigh P. Hale was born at Columbia, Missouri, January 10, 1883, 
a son of Levi and Robena (Robinson) Hale. His father was an oil 
producer and superintendent in various oil fields and later had charge 
of oil leases in Ohio. 

Doctor Hale attended the public schools of North Baltimore, Ohio, 
and on June 4, 1908, graduated M. D. from the Northwestern Medical 
College. Six months were spent in practical experience in the Monroe 
Street Hospital of Chicago and also in St. Margaret's Hospital at Ham- 
mond. Doctor Hale came to East Chicago in April, 1909, and has since 
conducted a general practice. He is a member of the County, State 
and National Medical societies, was formerly president of the City 
Board of Health, and is now county health commissioner. He was 
president of the East Chicago Club two years, and has affiliations with 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and 
in politics is a republican. On September 9, 1913, Doctor Hale married 
Harriet S. Phillips, of East Chicago. 

Reuben H. Spurrier. A business man with long and varied expe- 
rience in merchandising, Reuben H. Spurrier has been a resident of 
Whiting for the past five years, and is now one of the active members 
of the H. P. Spurrier & Company, hardware dealers. This firm was 
established by his brother, Harvey P. Spurrier, in March, 1906, with 
store at 438 One Hundred and Nineteenth Street, The firm carries a 
large stock of general hardware and furniture, and has a two-story 
building with twenty-five foot frontage. 

Reuben H. Spurrier was born in Perry County, Ohio, August 21, 
1860, a son of Louis and Hannah C. Spurrier. His father was a farmer, 
and the son grew up on a farm, attended the local schools, and as a boy 
left the farm to take a clerkship in a local store. In 1889 he opened 
a stock of groceries on his own account at Logan, Ohio, and was in 
business there until 1896. The following three years he sold dry goods 
for a jobbing house at Portsmouth, Ohio, and in 1898 assisted in estab- 
lishing the Goldthw r aite & Company cloak store at Columbus, Ohio. 
Mr. Spurrier remained with that firm until 1901. and then engaged in 
the hat business at Columbus. In 1909 he came to Whiting, bought an 
interest in the hardware business, which up to that time, had been 
conducted by his brother, Harvey P. 

William H. Spurrier was married in April, 1907, to Jessie H. 
Towns of Columbus. Mr. Spurrier is affiliated with the Masonic order 
and the Knights of Pythias, is a republican in politics, and in 1913 was 



660 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

elected on the citizens ticket for the office of alderman of the Second 
Ward. 

His brother, Harvey P. Spurrier, was born December 22, 1877, in 
Ohio, and was likewise reared on a farm and was educated in the public 
schools. Coming to Whiting in September, 1895, his services were given 
to the Standard Oil Company there until 1906, in which year he started 
the hardware business as above noted. While with the Standard Oil 
Company he was assistant engineer and in various other positions. Mr. 
Spurrier was married April 30, 1909, to Edith Brown of Valparaiso. 
He is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, is a pro- 
gressive in national politics, but goes with the citizens party in local 
affairs. 

Winfred W. Holliday. The public school system of Whiting ranks 
in efficiency of practical results, if not material equipment, along with 
the best schools of the state, and the chief features of the city schools 
are described on other pages of this publication. Attention is here given 
to the superintendent, Winfred W. Holliday, who has been identified 
with the local schools for nearly ten years, first as principal of the high 
schools and now as superintendent. Mr. Holliday has made education 
his life work, has a broad experience and a long record of successful 
results to his credit. 

Winfred W. Holliday was born at Chester, Ohio, November 26, 
1869, a son of J. T. and Angeline (Wamsley) Holliday. His father was 
a Methodist minister. Mr. Holliday attended the public schools of 
Ohio, graduated at the Valparaiso University in 1897, and subsequently 
took postgraduate studies in the Indiana University, where he graduated 
in 1903. His work as a district teacher began in Indiana in 1894 and in 
1897 he was principal of the high school at Guthrie, Oklahoma, was 
principal of the Bringhurst schools in Indiana, from 1898 to 1900, was 
superintendent of schools at Upland, Indiana, from 1900 to 1904, and 
the following two years was teacher of science in the Frankfort High 
School. With this broad and thorough equipment Mr. Holliday came 
to Whiting as principal of the high school, held that position four and 
a half years, and has since supervised the entire public school system 
of the city. 

Mr. Holliday was married October 10, 1893, to Mabel Floyd, of Mid- 
dlefork, Indiana. Their oldest son, Floyd T., now nineteen years of 
age, a graduate of the high school, who is on a ranch in Western Texas, 
Geraldine is thirteen years of age, and Winifred is aged seven. Mr. 
Mr. Holliday is master of Whiting Lodge, No. 613, A. F. & A. M., is a 
progressive in politics, and he and his wife are regular attendants at 
the Plymouth Congregational Church. 

The First National Bank op Whiting. Some of the most promi- 
nent capitalists and financiers in Northern Indiana were the organizers 
in 1902, of the First National Bank of Whiting, which is the only insti- 
tution operating under a national charter in that city. The establish- 
ment of the bank was due chiefly to Gallus J. Bader, whose name figures 
in the bank directors and official lists of a number of Lake County insti- 
tutions, and Fred J. Smith, who is now president of the First National 
Bank of Whiting. The other officers at the present time are W. E. 
Warwick, vice president ; John M. Thiele, cashier ; Charles D. Gainer, 
assistant cashier ; Joseph J. Chilla, manager of the foreign department ; 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 661 

while the directors are Gallus J. Bader, John M. Thiele, Fred J. Smith, 
John Schaub, W. E. Warwick, James A. Gill and F. R. Schaaf. 

The First National, since its establishment, has occupied the corner 
at One Hundred and Nineteenth and Oliver streets, but during the 
present year, 1914, a modern new banking house has been erected at the 
corner of One Hundred and Nineteenth Street and New York Avenue, 
with the lower floor handsomely fitted up for banking quarters and 
with nine suites of offices upstairs. It is a stone-faced and absolutely 
fireproof building. The First National has a capital of $50,000 and 
surplus and profits amounting to about $45,000. The total resources 
aggregate about $725,000, and the deposits in March, 1914, were nearly 
$580,000. A good index of the bank's growth is found in the increase 
of deposits, which in February, 1903, were about $40,000, four years 
later had passed the two hundred thousand mark, in February, 1913, 
were $460,000, and during the next year increased to more than half a 
million dollars. 

John M. Thiele, the cashier of the First National is a young banker 
of broad experience, and has been connected with banking for fifteen 
years. He was born at Goshen, Indiana, July 18, 1877, was educated 
in the parochial schools and graduated from the University of Notre 
Dame, of South Bend, in 1897. In 1898 he became an employe of the 
Schrage Bank at Whiting, and since 1903 has been cashier of the First 
National of that city. Mr. Thiele was married in 1904 to Catherine 
W. Crawley of Whiting, and they have a family of two daughters. Mr. 
Thiele affiliates with the Knights of Columbus, the Catholic Order of 
Foresters, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, is a member of 
the Catholic Church, and in politics is independent. 

George Berg. The people of Lowell have a very high esteem for 
George Berg, both as a business man and citizen. This is proved by the 
extensive trade which his store has always enjoyed, and Mr. Berg is 
always counted upon in the public-spirited movements for the advance- 
ment of the town and vicinity. 

George Berg was born at Dyer, Indiana, March 25, 1876, a son of 
Nicholas and Elizabeth Berg. His father was born in Lake County, a 
member of a pioneer family, June 1, 1847, and died June 30, 1911. 
The mother, who was born May 10, 1852, is still living. 

George Berg had his first schooling at Goodenow in Will County, 
Illinois, where his parents lived for several years. They returned to 
Lowell on March 25, 1886, and the schools of that town provided him 
with further advantages until he was fifteen, at which early age he 
began work for George Kimmell in the grocery trade. At the age of 
twenty-three Mr. Berg transferred his services to George M. Deathe, 
and for six years worked in his hardware store. Mr. Berg then bought 
out the old established business owned and conducted at that time by 
Mr. John Berg, and since then has been the active proprietor of this 
well-known mercantile house. This business has been in existence at 
Lowell about twenty-five years, having been founded by John Nash- 
wonder, who was succeeded by Eckhart Bixeman, who after about five 
years sold out to John Berg, who in turn was proprietor for eleven 
years, until the stock and fixtures were sold to Mr. George Berg. Since 
the latter took control it illustrates his progressive character as a mer- 
chant to state that the stock has been increased five different times, 
and he now sells goods to an extensive trade throughout the township. 



662 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

Mr. Berg was married at Lowell, October 18, 1900, to Matilda Meiers, 
who was educated in the Hanover Center parochial school, and is one 
of the active workers in the Lowell Catholic Church, and a member of 
the Married Ladies' Sodality. They are the parents of four children, 
one daughter and three sons : Sabena, Paul, Jordan and Walter, the old- 
est being eleven years and the youngest one year, and the two older are 
in school. Mr. Berg is affiliated with the Independent Order of For- 
esters, and is a republican in politics. 

George McKinley Deathe. For practically half a century the 
name of Deathe has been prominently associated with mercantile affairs 
at Lowell, and the hardware business, which had its beginning about the 
close of the Civil war as a small tin shop, is now a large and nourish- 
ing establishment conducted by George McKinley Deathe, a son of the 
founder. 

George McKinley Deathe, who is one of the youngest business men 
in Lowell, was born in that city in 1893, was graduated from the high 
school in 1911, and was then taken into his father's store, learning all 
the details of the business, and has since been its active manager. 

The business was founded by his father, the late George M. Deathe. 
in 1865, as a small tin shop. Out of that grew by gradual stages a 
hardware store, and at the present time it is one of the largest and 
best concerns of its kind in the county. The large stock is housed in 
a building of its own, a two-story brick structure, 30x90 feet, and the 
two floors and basement furnish a large floor space. George M. Deathe, 
the founder, died July 19, 1911. He was one of Lowell's oldest and 
best known citizens, was born in Rush County, Indiana, January 17. 
1841, grew up in Henry County, received his education in the common 
schools, and at the age of fourteen, began learning the trade of tin- 
ner. In 1859 he came to Lake County, spent the following year on a 
farm, then taught school for two years at Merrillville, and subsequently 
clerked in a dry goods store at Lowell until engaging in business on his 
own account. The senior Deathe married Miss Margaret Johnson, a 
native of Canada. They became the parents of four children : Minnie, 
deceased; May, Winifred and Jessie. In 1883 the mother of these chil- 
dren died, and the senior Deathe was left with three children to care 
for. In 1885 he married Emma Buchanan of Hebron, and they are the 
parents of six children. The late Mr. Deathe was a prominent republi- 
can, was a charter member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
also a member of the Masonic Order, and was one of the first board of 
directors of the Lowell National Bank. A man of high moral character, 
his career was much appreciated by his fellow citizens, and his name is 
one that will not soon be forgotten in the community. His business has 
been continued in able hands under the management of his son. Mr. 
Deathe 's mother, Mrs. Emma. Deathe, is now living at Lowell at the age 
of fifty-eight, 

J. T. Wachowski. Engaged in the practice of law at Chicago and 
Gary for more than twenty years, Mr. Wachowski 's career has been 
characterized by the usual accomplishments and rewards of the success- 
ful lawyer, and at the same time by various distinctive services such as 
only a leader at the bar can perform for his community. Mr. Wachowski 
is one of the early members of the Gary bar, and is one of the fore- 
most representatives in the profession of his nationality, which is so 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 663 

liberally represented in the citizenship of Gary. His office is at 690 
Broadway in Gary. 

J. T. Wachowski was born in the Province of Posen, Poland, in 
1867, and when seven years of age, in 1874, was brought to America. 
His family settled in Chicago, and his early education was acquired 
by attendance at the public schools, followed by a collegiate course in 
St. Stanislaus College of that city. While Mr. Wachowski is a man 
of liberal education, it is proper to say that most of it was acquired 
as a result of his own efforts and at the expense of his own earnings. 
After his college work he took a course in the Metropolitan Business 
College of Chicago, and in 1891 was graduated from the Illinois Col- 
lege of Law. Admitted to the bar, he formed some profitable connec- 
tions with his profession in Chicago, and practiced regularly in the 
courts of that city until 1907. In that year he came to Gary with the 
advance guard of population in this city, and both among his fellow 
countrymen and the community at large has acquired a splendid prac- 
tice. He is a member of the Lake County Bar Association. 

Mr. Wachowski 's parents are both deceased. He married Verincia 
Bogucki at Milwaukee. Mr. Wachowski has membership in the Polish 
National Alliance of America, with the Masonic Order, and is a republi- 
can. He is the owner of considerable property in Gary, comprising 
a residence in the First subdivision at 815 Adams Street, and also busi- 
ness property at the corner of Eighteenth and Washington. He has 
a brother prominent in Chicago business affairs and president of the 
Wachowski Building and Loan Association, a company which J. T. 
Wachowski represents as attorney. 

A. T. Elliott. Lake County's prominent educators include Pro- 
fessor Elliott, the superintendent of the Lowell public schools, where 
his work has been marked by many improvements, and the Lowell High 
School is now one of the best equipped and one of the strongest in the 
Calumet district. 

A. T. Elliott was born in Randolph County, Indiana, November 18, 
1885. His early education was acquired in the village schools at Spartan- 
burg, he graduated from the Richmond High School in 1902, from the 
Richmond Business College in 1905, and was given the degree Bache- 
lor of Science at Earlham College, at Richmond, in 1911. His work 
from early youth has been along educational lines, and in addition to 
the training already described, he was for three terms in the normal 
training courses at the State Normal and Marion Normal. His first work 
as a teacher was in the grade schools for three years at Arba and Bos- 
ton, Indiana. In 1907-10 he was principal in the commercial depart- 
ment of the Richmond Business College, and in 1911 took charge of the 
Lowell High School, and has been superintendent of the local schools 
for the past three years. Some of the noticeable improvements since 
he took charge should be mentioned. He has added a domestic science 
course for three years, a manual training course, and has done much 
to make gymnastics and athletics an essential part of the curriculum. 
The Lowell High School has had an exceptionally strong basket ball and 
track team. In 1911 a three year course in agriculture was added, and 
for this purpose the school has eight acres of land. In 1911 the school 
was improved with a new heating system, and in 1915 a new high school 
building was completed. The representative of the Lowell High School 
won first place in oratory in a contest among other schools at Hammond, 



664 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

and first place in 1913 at Gary. Mr. Elliott brings to his work thor- 
ough training and the enthusiasm and enlightment of the best modern 
educators. Fraternally he is affiliated with the Masonic order and has 
held offices in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His church is the 
Methodist. He is fond of motoring and hunting, and is a constant 
student of local conditions and in every way within his power is work- 
ing to make the school a factor in community life. 

Robert Klose. One of the fine old pioneers of the Calumet district 
was the late Robert Klose, who was one of the original settlers and 
landowners where City of AVhiting now stands. He was a substantial 
German-American, thrifty, hard-working, provided liberally for his 
family, and died with the respect and esteem of his community. 

Robert Klose was born in Germany, November 10, 1832, a son of 
Karl and Ernestine Klose. His youth and early manhood were spent 
in his native land, and in 1862 on emigrating to America he settled 
at Chesterton, Indiana. His next move was to South Chicago, in 1868, 
and in 1870 he established his home at what is now the City of "Whit- 
ing. While employed on the railway as a section foreman, he kept a 
nice little home and was the owner of three acres now included within 
the city limits of Whiting. Robert Klose died in 1896. 

In 1869 he married Augusta. Trowe, who was born in Germany, 
and came to the United States in 1863, having made the voyage in a 
sailing vessel and spending five weeks on the water. She was a daugh- 
ter of Gottfried and Christiana Trowe, who established their home at 
Chesterton. Robert Klose and wife had two children, Charles R. and 
Ella, the wife of Roy E. Green. The family, since coming to America, 
have been active members of the German Lutheran Church. 

Charles R. Klose. "While developing a large business that now 
offers a service familiar to all the people of Whiting, Charles R. Klose 
has never neglected his civic responsibilities, and deserves special credit 
for his work in developing the present public school equipment of his 
home city and is at the present time a member of the board of public 
works. 

Charles R. Klose was born in Whiting, August 21, 1880, a son of 
Robert A. and Augusta Klose. His father was for a number of years 
employed by the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railway, until his 
death, on May 24, 1896. The son grew up in Whiting, is a graduate of 
the first class in the high school, and had his business training by two 
years with the J. J. Donegan Coal Company. This was followed by 
two years with the Standard Oil Company, and on August 21, 1903, on 
his twenty-third birthday, he and Paul J. Scholz, started a small busi- 
ness, handling feed, poultry and produce. In 1909 they bought out 
the Robert Atchison coal yard, and that business is now conducted under 
the corporate title of the Northern Indiana Lumber & Coal Company. 
In 1910 the partners established the first automobile garage in Whiting. 

Mr. Klose was married July 14, 1904, to Lilian Wright of Chicago. 
They have two children: Norene and Lilian. Mr. Klose is affiliated 
with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and in politics is a 
republican. His service as a member of the Whiting School Board 
continued for six years, between 1906 and 1912, and during one year 
he was secretary and for the remaining five years was president of the 
board. It was during that time that the splendid high school build- 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 665 

ing was constructed at a cost of $140,000. In January, 1914, Mr. Klose 
was appointed commissioner of the board of public works in Whiting for 
a term of four years. 

East Chicago Company. It was in June, 1901, work was com- 
menced in the northeast part of the limits of East Chicago, but miles 
away from the factory and residence section of that city, on a new 
industrial city project, especially to provide a site for a large inde- 
pendent steel mill. It was in August, 1902, that the Inland Steel Mills 
was ready for operation, and already at that date Indiana Harbor was 
a town and almost a city. It is not the intention to tell the detailed 
history of Indiana Harbor here, but only an outline of facts concern- 
ing the great land company which has owned and controlled the local- 
ity and has been chiefly responsible for the upbuilding of a city at that 
point. 

The East Chicago Company was organized in 1901, and has suc- 
ceeded and taken over the properties and the business of several other 
land companies which had preceded it in the field. It was in 1887 and 
succeeding years that Gen. Joseph Torrence of Chicago, started the 
Calumet Canal and Improvement Company and the Standard Steel & 
Iron Company, and it was the latter organization which promoted and 
laid out the City of East Chicago. From that enterprise was developed 
the comprehensive plan which subsequently included and originated the 
Indiana Harbor project. The Chicago and Calumet Railway, now known 
as the B. O. C. T. Railroad, was likewise an early factor in the city's 
growth of that early date. In 1895 the Lake Michigan Land Company 
was organized by Owen F. Aldis of Chicago and associates, and they 
acquired the property now included within the limits of Indiana Har- 
bor, and began the first important development work and eventually 
made Indiana Harbor the seat of the Inland Steel Company. This 
company's operations were followed by reorganization in 1901, of the 
East Chicago Company, and in 1903, three other companies were absorbed 
and their land holdings acquired. 

The East Chicago Company has the following officers: Robert E. 
Tod, of New York, president ; C. A. Westberg, whose home is in Chicago, 
but with business headquarters in Indiana Harbor, vice president and 
treasurer; and Thomas F. Mooney, secretary. The company has a capital 
of $1,000,000, and its operation has been the mainspring in Indiana Har- 
bor's growth and development. General Torrence sold out his holdings 
about 1892, and Mr. Tod has since been the controlling factor in the 
enterprise. The company started with 7,000 acres, sold land to every 
factory and industrial project of Indiana Harbor, and still has some 
twenty-two hundred acres left. Under the auspices of the company the 
harbor was constructed during 1901-03, and in 1904 the Indiana Harbor 
Canal was started, and at the present time it has been opened for a dis- 
tance of six miles, and its channel has a depth of twenty feet allowing 
practically all the freight boats of the Great Lakes to enter and dis- 
charge and receive cargoes at the docks of Indiana Harbor. As the ac- 
tive executive in charge of the affairs of the company at Indiana Harbor, 
C. A. Westberg has a prominent place in local affairs. Born in Chicago 
in 1881, a son of P. A. Westberg, his father a contractor and builder of 
that city, Mr. Westberg is a graduate of the high schools in Chicago, and 
his early experience was acquired in the contracting business with his 
father until the latter 's death. His record with the East Chicago Com- 



666 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

pany, whose services he entered in 1904, has been one of unusual ad- 
vancement and indicates the aggressive energy and ability with which 
Mr. Westberg handles everything intrusted to his care. He began with 
the company as collector, and has since held every post in the company 's 
service but that of president. Mr. Westberg is a republican in politics, 
and has fraternal membership with the Masonic Lodge and the Royal 
Arch Chapter and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

Citizens Trust & Savings Bank op Indiana Harbor. As an insti- 
tution that meets the highest standards of financial service in an indus- 
trial and commercial community the Citizens Trust & Savings Bank of 
Indiana Harbor has fulfilled all the requirements of success. 

This bank was established in June, 1909, and with less than five 
years of history has resources and a record of service which places it 
among the strongest banks of the Calumet region. At the close of the 
year 1913 the total resources of the Citizens Trust & Savings Bank were 
$261,129.51. At that date the deposits aggregated over $200,000.00, and 
while the capital stock is $50,000.00, the surplus amounts to $4,000.00 
and undivided profits between $5,000.00 and $6,000.00. When first 
started the capital was $25,000.00 and was increased to its present amount 
in March, 1912. The first officers were J. R. Farovid, who was the 
organizer and is still president; A. G. Lundquist. vice president; and 
C. P. Packard, Jr., cashier. 

The banking house in which the bank has its quarters was erected in 
1908. Originally this was the Citizens State Bank, organized by a 
group of Chicago capitalists who subsequently sold their interests to 
Mr. Farovid. and under his direction the company was reorganized in 
its present form. 

It is not only a position as president of one of the strongest banks 
but also as a pioneer business man that J. R. Farovid occupies m Indiana 
Harbor. He was born in Council Bluffs, Iowa, in 1871, and in the same 
year his parents, James A. and Mary E. (Vincent) Farovid moved to 
Chicago. His father was in the wholesale hat and cap business. The 
Indiana Harbor banker was educated in the public schools, and in 1896 
graduated from Harvard University. After several years of business 
experience elsewhere, he identified himself with the Indiana Harbor 
enterprise in the fall of 1901, and as a real estate man sold the first lot 
on that new townsite. He represented the Lake Michigan Land Trustees, 
and after several years in looking after the interests of others he opened 
an office for himself in 1906. Thus Mr. Farovid had behind him a long 
and thorough experience in local business affairs and enjoyed the com- 
plete confidence of the community when he organized the bank in 1909. 

Mr. Farovid is affiliated with the Masonic Order, with the Knights 
of Pythias, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, has served as 
president of the Indiana Harbor library board, and in politics is a 
progressive republican. 

Frank W. Smith, M. D. While his ability and success in the medi- 
cal and surgical profession have given him rank among the foremost 
doctors in Lake County, Doctor Smith outside of his large private prac- 
tice is perhaps best known to the people of Northwestern Indiana as a 
courageous and brilliant public leader, and has been active and a use- 
ful worker in public affairs for a number of years. It was with Doctor 
Smith as a leader that the City of Gary recently effected a complete 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 667 

change in its municipal administration, and brought about the over- 
throw of the old regime, inaugurated a new government with com- 
petence and economy, efficiency and honesty, as its basic principle. His 
many enthusiastic friends in the tenth district say that Doctor Smith 
will be the next congressman from this part of Indiana. 

Frank W. Smith is a native of Clinton County, Indiana, where he 
was born September 20, 1867, a son of J. W. and Sarah A. Smith. His 
father was for many years a lumberman and is now living retired. Since 
the years of his early manhood Doctor Smith has been in the ranks 
of social service workers, first as a teacher, then as a physician and 
surgeon, and at the same time as a public leader. He is a man of 
splendid education, went through the public schools as a boy, graduated 
from the Indiana State Normal, took post-graduate work in the Univer- 
sity of Chicago, studied medicine at Rush Medical College at Chicago 
and in the Marion Sims College of Medicine at St. Louis and also in 
the Indiana School of Medicine. While his practice at Gary is of a 
general nature, he has been called upon as a surgeon so much that 
surgical work now constitutes perhaps the major part of his profes- 
sional activities. Doctor Smith has membership in all the local, state 
and national medical associations. 

In 1892 he married Gertrude E. Mattix, of Clinton County, Indiana. 
Their two children are Lucile, aged twenty, and Robert, aged seven. 
Doctor Smith has fraternal membership in the following orders : Knights 
of Pythias, Independent Order of Foresters, Ancient Order of United 
Workmen, Improved Order of Red Men, Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, the Loyal Order of Moose. His wife is an attendant 
of the Methodist Church. 

Since casting has first vote Doctor Smith has been a republican, 
and at the present time is in his second two-year term as county coroner 
of Lake County. It was in 1913 that Doctor Smith took the lead in 
the organization of the Citizens Party of Gary, of which he was chair- 
man. At the same time he is chairman of the republican party organiza- 
tion in the city. The citizens party conducted a compaign to "clean 
up Gary," and its incidents and results are still fresh in the memory 
of all citizens in the Calumet region. The party drew its supporters 
from all classes and the campaign was so well organized and conducted 
so evidently for the best interests of the community at large, that prac- 
tically the entire voting element interested in good and clean local 
government was enlisted for its success. As a result of the campaign a 
new mayor was elected, and great results are to be expected from the 
present municipal government. Doctor Smith for several years has 
been a co-worker with Fred A. Sims in the ninth district. For fifteen 
years before entering upon the practice of medicine, Doctor Smith was 
a teacher, and supported himself and paid his way through higher 
schools by his work in that profession. He has taught in every grade 
of school from a country district to instructor in the St. Louis University. 

Fred Gastel, Jr. The relations of Fred Gastel, Jr., with Indiana 
Harbor, which have subsisted pleasantly and profitably for the past ten 
years, are chiefly through insurance, loans, and general brokerage lines. 
He is one Of the successful and popular business men, has worked hard 
for all he has got, and has well merited his success. 

While perhaps the majority of successful men in the Calumet region 
today were born in other localities and have been drawn into this field 



668 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

by the presence of its great industrial and commercial resources, Fred 
Gastel, Jr., acknowledges Lake County as his native home and can claim 
a pioneer relationship for his family with this section. Fred Gastel, Jr., 
was born at Hammond, November 20, 1883, and is a son of Fred and 
Gertrude (Hilbrich) Gastel. His father, who is now a retired real estate 
dealer, came to Tolleston in Lake County in 1861, from there moved to 
Hammond in 1872, thus being an early settler in two points that have 
since become centers of industrial development and population in the 
Calumet region. 

Fred Gastel, Jr., spent his early boyhood in Hammond, attended the 
public schools, and after finishing a commercial course in Valparaiso in 
1900 was employed by the firm of Libby, McNeill & Libby of Chicago 
one year as paymaster, and on coming to Indiana Harbor in 1903 was 
made paying teller for the Indiana Harbor State Bank. Since 1904 Mr. 
Gastel, Jr., has been engaged in independent operations as a real estate 
and insurance broker. He handles real estate, insurance, commercial 
paper, bonds, and acts as a general broker and financial agent. 

On June 20, 1906, Mr. Gastel married Ida D. Joern of Crown Point. 
Their two children are Fred the third and Dorothy Marie. Mr. Gastel 
has membership in the Masonic Blue Lodge of Indiana Harbor and in 
the Royal Arch Chapter at East Chicago, is independent in his political 
relations, and a member of the Commercial Clubs of Lake County. 

Indiana Harbor Lumber and Coal Company. This, one of the most 
extensive concerns of its kind in the Calumet region, was established in 
1902, the year in which the great steel mills began operation and when 
Indiana Harbor became an industrial city in fact as well as in name. 
However, the first lumber from the yards was sold by the Greer- Wilker- 
son Lumber Company, under which name the business was first estab- 
lished, and it has been conducted as the Indiana Harbor Lumber and 
Coal Company since 1903. Mr. C. V. Gough, now of Gary, was the first 
manager of the business, and was succeeded in 1907 by Mr. E. E. Dubbs. 
Mr. Dubbs is an old hand in the lumber trade, and was promoted from 
the office of assistant manager to his present responsibilities. The com- 
pany's yards and sheds cover 2y 2 acres of ground, located conveniently 
on the Indiana. Harbor Belt Railway and the Chicago, Indiana & South- 
ern line. The business is one of extensive proportions, and all kinds of 
lumber, building material, coal and wood are the chief commodities 
handled. 

E. E. Dubbs was born at Peru, Indiana, in 1881, a son of Edward E. 
and Alice (Williams) Dubbs. His father was for many years an active 
business man at Peru, engaged in the hotel and other lines of enterprise. 
Mr. Dubbs is the example of the college man who has succeeded in busi- 
ness affairs, and after spending four years in Wabash College at Craw- 
fordsville graduated from Purdue University in 1903. His first experi- 
ence was in the himber trade at Cincinnati, Ohio, with the C. Crane 
Lumber Company. Later he was with the C. E. Fouts Lumber Company 
at Zanesville, Ohio, and in 1904 came to Indiana Harbor to become assist- 
ant manager to Mr. Gough, whom he succeeded as manager in 1907. 

Mr. Dubbs on October 14, 1911, married Kathryn McGrath, of Chi- 
cago, who was born in Leachburg, Pennsylvania. They have one child, 
Jane McGrath, born July 11, 1914. Mr. Dubbs has membership in the 
Phi Kappa Psi College fraternity, the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, the Masonic Order and belongs to the lumbermen's organization, 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 669 

the Hoo Hoos. His church is the Presbyterian, and in politics he 
supports the republican party. 

B. C. Lukens. The Central Drug Store was established at Indiana 
Harbor in 1908 by B. C. Lukens, an old and established druggist, and 
under whose capable management the store lias gained the confidence 
and patronage of the best class of people in the city. Mr. Lukens has 
been acquainted in a practical manner with the drug business since he 
was a boy, and his enterprise and progressive ideas have made him one 
of the successful merchants of this thriving city in the Calumet region. 
His store building is at 3410 Michigan Avenue, has ground dimensions 
of 25x100 feet, and his stock is complete in a supply of pure drugs and 
all the general commodities usually carried in an up-to-date establish- 
ment of the kind. 

B. C. Lukens was born at LaGrange, Indiana, in June, 1865, a son of 
Moses and Margaret (Boyd) Lukens. His father was a miller, and died 
in 1867 when the son was an infant. His mother died in 1882. Mr. 
Lukens was reared in the family of his grandfather Boyd, attended the 
public schools so far as his opportunities permitted, but was only twelve 
years old when he did his first work in a drug store and served a thor- 
ough and long apprenticeship in every phase of the business. In 1890 
Mr. Lukens bought a half interest in a store at Huntington, Indiana, 
and from there moved to Indiana Harbor in 1908. 

In 1890 Mr. Lukens married Ora Draggoo, of LaGrange, Indiana. 
They have one son, Boyd. Mr. Lukens affiliates with the Masonic Order, 
the Knights of Pythias, the Knights of the Maccabees, and the Royal 
League. He also belongs to the Commei-cial Club, and in politics is 
independent. 

David J. Lewis. The Monarch Hardware and Furniture Company 
was established in Indiana Harbor in 1907 by David J. Lewis, who is 
president and treasurer of the corporation. The secretary is J. II. Lewis 
and the other director of the company is II. Moffat. In seven years the 
business has grown to one of flourishing proportions, and is one of the 
best managed and best patronized establishments of its kind in East 
Chicago. Its location is at 3339 Michigan Avenue, and the stock is 
housed in a two-story building 25x80 feet. A full line of furniture and 
hardware is carried, and the proprietors have been close students of the 
mercantile problems involved, have maintained an excellent credit, and 
every year since the beginning has seen a satisfying increase in the total 
volume of business done. 

David J. Lewis has had a varied career, was in the service of the 
United States navy about the time of the Spanish-American and Phil- 
ippine wars, and came into his present success after a long experience in 
the school of adversity and hard knocks. Born in the City of Milwau- 
kee, Wisconsin, in 1875, he was a son of John G. and Margaret (Wat- 
kins) Lewis. His father, who was an iron worker, was killed as a result 
of a boiler explosion in 1888, and the mother, being left with nine young 
children, in the same year moved to East Chicago, where the children 
grew up and all members of the household had to bear their part in 
earning enough for food and shelter. David J. Lewis when eleven years 
old did his first work in a mill, and had very limited opportunities for 
schooling. He continued as a mill worker until seventeen years old, when 
he learned the bricklayer's trade, but on reaching his majority enlisted 



670 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

in the United States navy in the engineering service as yeoman. For 
some time he was employed largely in clerical and secretarial work for 
the chief engineer and captain of the vessel on which he served. His 
command was engaged in some of the campaigns and in garrison and 
other duties during the Philippine war, and later was a part of the 
American forces sent to China during the Boxer rebellion. Mr. Lewis 
while in the navy encircled the globe, and for his efficient conduct re- 
ceived two medals. On returning to East Chicago in 1901, he spent six 
years in work at his trade, and then engaged in his present line of 
business. 

In October, 1911, Mr. Lewis married Mrs. Jane Young, of Akron, 
Ohio. They have one son. Mr. Lewis is active in Masonic circles, being 
past master of East Chicago Lodge No. 595, A. F. & A. M., has taken 
the Knights Templar degrees, thirty-two degrees of the Scottish Rite, 
and belongs to the Mystic Shrine. Other affiliations are with the Frater- 
nal Order of Eagles, and the Commercial Club. In politics he is a 
progressive republican. 

Daniel W. Dupes. Following many years of active service as a rail- 
road man, the duties of which service had already brought him to 
Indiana Harbor, Mr. Dupes has for the past four years been one of the 
enterprising real estate men of that city, and now operates one of the 
best known and most liberally patronized agencies and brokerage houses 
in the city. 

A native of Ohio, Daniel W. Dupes was born in Williamstown August 
31, 1869, a son of Adam and Keziah (Edgar) Dupes. His father was a 
farmer. His ambitions early caused him to long for things beyond the 
horizon of the farm, and after finishing the course of the Dunkirk high 
school in Ohio he learned telegraphy and became a regular operator 
with the Pennsylvania railway. During the following years he served 
as operator, as extra agent and as agent, for a total period of twenty-two 
years, during which time he was stationed in Ohio, Illinois and Indiana. 
For several years he was agent at Hegewisch, Illinois, and for two years 
at Indiana Harbor. 

It was in 1905 that Mr. Dupes came to Indiana Harbor as agent for 
the railway, but in December, 1907, resigned after his long career which 
made him a veteran railroad man, and in June, 1908, became a salesman 
for the J. R. Farovid Company. He remained with that concern until 
October, 1910, and then engaged in the real estate business under the 
firm name of Saric & Dupes Company. Since June 1, 1913, Mr. Dupes 
has had his office alone at 3401 Michigan Avenue, and now looks after 
an extensive business in the handling of several large properties in 
rental and collection branches, and in general real estate brokerage. 

On December 1, 1890, he married Winifred Haldeman, of Dunkirk, 
Ohio. At her death in December, 1897, she left three children named as 
follows : Karl, Oretchen and Winifred. In April, 1900, Mr. Dupes mar- 
ried for his second wife Nellie F. Rogers, of Boscobel, Wisconsin. The 
four children of this marriage are: Marion; Lowell; Carmen, deceased; 
and Bonnie Madeline. Mr. Dupes affiliates with the Royal League, is 
independent in politics, ami his church is the Methodist. 

Frank Zawadzki. In introducing some statistics and other informa- 
tion concerning the Polish people of Gary, it is appropriate to begin with 
Mr. Frank Zawadzki, who is commissioner for the State of Indiana of 




<&. 



^ WVLAAhVu)fS^ 




LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 671 

the National Polish Alliance, and a former treasurer of that organization. 
Mr. Zawadzki is one of the most prominent Poles in Northern Indiana, 
and as commissioner of the State Alliance has thirty-two lodges or indi- 
vidual organizations under his supervision. He has also made a splendid 
record of business success at Gary, and on January 5, 1914, was appointed 
to the important office of membership on the board of public works. 

In many ways his career is typical of other successful Polish Ameri- 
cans. He was born in Russian Poland, November 29, I860, came to the 
United States in 1879, spent six years in New York, then moved west to 
Chicago, and after one year as a laborer got on the police force, and was 
a Chicago policeman for sixteen years and four months, with a record of 
bravery and efficiency that often brought him commendation from his 
superiors. Most of his service on the police force was on the west side, 
and for five years he served as interpreter for the Chicago Department 
of Health. Coming to Gary in 1906, the year that city, was founded, 
Mr. Zawadzki opened the Hotel New World, at the corner of 12th and 
Broadway. After three years in that location he opened a new place 
under the same name at 1120 Broadway, and a year and a half later, 
in November. 1912, opened his present hotel at the corner of 15th and 
Broadway. 

Mr. Zawadzki was married in 187!) to Mary Malinowska, who was 
born in the same section of Poland as her husband. They are the parents 
of six children, three of whom are now deceased. Mr. Zawadzki and 
wife are members of the Catholic Church, and in politics he is independent, 
and it was his vigorous record as a business man and citizen and well- 
known independence and integrity, which brought about his appoint- 
ment as a member of the Gary Board of Public Works. 

When the Polish people celebrated the anniversary of their revolu- 
tionary days of January 22, 1831, and November 29, 1863. on January 
22, 1914, the Calumet published an interesting article on Gary's Polish 
citizens, with particular reference to Mr. Zawadzki. and the greater 
part of that article is quoted herewith for its value as local history. 

There are some three thousand Poles in Gary, according to this arti- 
cle, and they are a sturdy people. As a rule they are laborers, having 
come to free America with nothing but brawny arms to work with and 
good brains, although uneducated. Just why these agricultural people 
drift, into the cities and mills is a problem for the sociologist to solve, 
but they have come to America in great numbers, three thousand of 
them to Gary, and most of these found employment in the steel mills. 
On immigrating, what little money they had accumulated shrunk amaz- 
ingly, for, to take Austria for an example, the equivalent of $25 is 
worth only $7.50 in our money. Considerable property in Gary is now 
held by the Polish people. Perhaps the most conspicuous success is that 
of Frank or Franciszek Zawadzki. who came to America from Russian 
Poland and has become not only a leader among the local Poles, but a 
national leader as well. In the appointment of Mr. Zawadzki to the 
Gary Board of Works, Mayor Johnson recognized Mr. Zawadzki 's 
acknowledged ability, and at the same time his appreciation of the Polish 
vote. Not more than twenty Poles in the recent municipal election voted 
the customary democratic ticket. They were all for Johnson. 

The Poles' belong to the great Slavic race. Of the large foreign-born 
population of Gary, fully 65 per cent are Slavs and their natural increase 
is very rapid. The Servians and Croatians number about, five thou- 
sand ; Bohemians, three thousand; Poles, three thousand; Slavonians, 



672 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

two thousand five hundred to three thousand; Hungarians, one thou- 
sand five hundred ; Macedonians, one thousand. These seven nationalities 
of the Slavic race constitute half of Gary or more, and they are a power 
which must be reckoned with. Considered as ancestors only, they pre- 
sent some interesting angles for study. Nationality is hardly recognized 
in the second generation. Out of their assimilation will spring a strong 
race. 

The Poles are an intensely patriotic people. They love their Father- 
land, and are hoping and waiting for the moment to come when their un- 
happy country can strike off its fetters and become an independent nation 
once more. It is with that in view that the anniversary is celebrated — 
to keep alive the national spirit in the children. Unlike America's 
Fourth of July, Poland's celebration commemorates a defeat. The 
unavailing January insurrection took place in 1831, and the November 
revolt in 1863, in Russian Poland. For more than a year Polish blood 
poured over that unhappy country. Almost a thousand skirmishes 
and battles were fought, and some thirty-five thousand were killed or 
wounded. Many thousands were exiled. 

The organizing power of this people in America has been wonder- 
ful. Thirty-one years ago a movement was started in Philadelphia, 
which resulted in the Polish National Alliance of America. More than 
one hundred thousand loyal sons and daughters of Poland are in the 
organization, and are working faithfully for their beloved country. As 
the chief of the information bureau of the alliance expresses it, "they 
are earnestly enlightening and educating themselves; they are uplift- 
ing themselves morally and spiritually, so that they may become worthy 
of the moment when their country calls to them for help to liberate her 
from the chains of Austria, Russia and Germany." 

There are thirty-two societies in Indiana which are branches of the 
Polish alliance, the national headquarters of which are in Chicago. The 
alliance has built up an enormous property, has paid out $4,500,000 to 
widows and orphans, has established weekly and daily papers, and has a 
surplus today of $1,700,000, of which $10,000 has been loaned in Gary 
to help build up the city. As state commissioner and ex-treasurer of 
the alliance, Mr. Zawadzki has succeeded in securing the adoption of a 
measure setting apart one cent a month from each member's payment 
as a fund for the care of old and disabled members. With a membership 
of 101,000 a large fund will result. 

The Poles are Catholics. They built the first church in Gary, on 
Connecticut Street, between 17th and 18th avenues, and a sketch of the 
Catholic Church in Gary will be found elsewhere in this work. 

Commenting on the patriotism of the Poles, Mr. Zawadzki in the 
Calumet said: "The Polish people love America. They are trying to 
absorb her spirit and the spirit of her institutions. But there is no harm 
in their thinking of the Fatherland once in a while. Should the Ameri- 
can flag ever be in danger, you will find that of all nationalities, the 
Poles will furnish the biggest percentage of its defenders. ' ' 

Lazar W. Saric. Probably no business man of Indiana Harbor has 
a more definite and practical knowledge of real estate values and busi- 
ness generally than L. W. Saric, who during the past seven or eight 
years has had an important part in developing the city and handling 
real estate for a large group of citizens. 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 673 

Lazar W. Saric is a native of Slavonia, born July 14, 1874. His 
early life was spent in his native land, and in 1903 he came to the United 
States, worked in a hank at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, one year, spent 
two and a half years in the real estate and foreign exchange business at 
Youngstown, Ohio, and then after eight months at Detroit arrived at 
Indiana Harbor in 1907 and went to work for Mr. Farovid, head of the 
Citizens Trust and Savings Bank. He was associated with Mr. Farovid 
for two years, and since then has engaged in real estate business inde- 
pendently, with his office at 3448 Guthrie. Since then Mr. Saric has 
built more than a hundred houses, and has introduced a number of 
families from different parts of the country to the home owning and 
thrifty population of Indiana Harbor. Besides his individual transac- 
tions, some of the large property owners have regular relations with 
him for the handling of their business and residence property as agent. 
He was admitted to the bar October 22, 1914. 

In 1900 Mr. Saric married Maria Cochisa, who was born in Slavonia 
of Roumanian descent. Mr. Saric has affiliations with the following 
fraternal orders: the Fraternal Order of Eagles, the Royal League, the 
Servian National Globe of America, He is a republican, and quite 
active and influential in local affairs. 

Frank Jerome. Soon after the commercial center of Indiana Harbor 
was established, Frank Jerome, who for many years has been identified 
with business in the City of Chicago, opened a furniture store in the 
new town, and as one of the pioneer merchants has enjoyed a successful 
trade increasing with the population, and at the same time has been one 
of the energetic spirits in community affairs. 

Mr. Jerome was born at Ellicottville, New York, in July, 1856, and 
belongs to the same family of which the former district attorney of New 
York City is a representative. The Jeromes have been prominent in 
America since the early colonial days and some of the ancestors served 
as soldiers in the American Revolution. Mr. Jerome's father, Charles 
Jerome, was a minister of the Presbyterian Church. The mother's 
maiden name was Elizabeth Reed. Frank Jerome's boyhood was spent 
in the Village of Clinton, New York, famous as the seat of Hamilton 
College, and he began a commercial career before reaching his majority. 
In 1874 he moved to Philadelphia, and came west to Chicago in 1876, 
and has lived in this vicinity ever since. For many years he sold goods 
on the road and was also in the brokerage business in Chicago. In 1902, 
the year which saw the opening of the Great Inland Steel Mill at the 
new town of Indiana Harbor, Mr. Jerome established what was known 
as the "Wigwam," and put in a stock of furniture. His store is a build- 
ing 50 by 90 feet with a basement, and his increasing trade has necessitated 
expansion and in 1907 he bought what he calls the Annex, which is also 
filled with a large and varied stock of furniture equipment. The 
"Annex" was built in 1901 by Joseph Place, of East Chicago, and is 
therefore one of the landmarks of Indiana Harbor. For several years 
it was used as a meeting house and since it came into the possession of 
Mr. Jerome has afforded additional space for his business. 

In August, 1909, Mr. Jerome married Amalie Hofer, of Iowa. Mr. 
Jerome has fraternal affiliations with the Masonic Order, including the 
Knight Templar degree and membership in the Mystic Shrine, and is 
also a member of the Order of the Sons of the American Revolution. 



674 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

Pie belongs to the City Club of Chicago, the Chikaming Country Club 
of Michigan and tbe local Commercial Club. In polities he is republican. 

Wolf Marcovich. One of Indiana Harbor's most successful men is 
"Wolf Marcovich, who came to the United States a dozen years ago, 
located at the new center of industry in the Calumet region in 1904, and 
by extensive dealing and development in real estate has become one of 
the largest factors and at the same time has probably done as much as 
any other individual to upbuild his community in a material way. 

Wolf Marcovich was born in Roumania, one of the little countries 
comprising the Balkan Confederacy, in 1868. In 1902, emigrating to 
the United States, he located in Chicago, and two years later moved to 
Indiana. Harbor. There he opened a place of business as a dealer in 
foreign exchange, real estate, and the sale of steamship tickets, at 3716 
Center Street. His most important activity has been the buying and 
selling of property, and the building of many homes in this city. His 
contracts, always conducted on a high plane of honorable dealings, has 
made him one of the wealthy men of the city, and at the present time 
he pays taxes on local property probably as high as any other individual. 

On March 12, 1894, Mr. Marcovich married Buna Herskovice of 
Roumania. Their six children are: Gazelle, who is assisting his father 
in business ; Fannie ; Paul ; Michael ; Eva ; and Abraham, the only one 
of the children born in Indiana Harbor. The family are members of the 
Jewish Church. Mr. Marcovich affiliates with the B'Nai B'rith and the 
I. 0. B. A. In politics he is a progressive republican. One of the chief 
thoroughfares in Indiana Harbor is Hunter Street, on which Mr. Mar- 
covich first located on coming to Indiana Harbor, and the development 
of that street as a business avenue has been influenced as much by Mr. 
Marcovich as by any other citizen. 

M. Clifp\)rd Wiley. More than any other profession perhaps is the 
architect known by his works, and by that standard M. Clifford Wiley, 
East Chicago architect, is easily one of the leaders in his profession in 
the Calumet district. 

M. Clifford Wiley was born at Lowell, in Lake County, Indiana, son 
of Wilson and Clarinda Wiley. The Wiley family came from Ohio to 
Lake County during the early times, and the father was a farmer here. 
Mr. Wiley was thoroughly educated, but chiefly from means supplied by 
his own labor, and until entering his present profession was engaged in 
teaching. He attended school at Valparaiso University, also the Cook 
County Normal School in Illinois, and during his work as teacher was 
principal of the Lowell public schools from 1894 to 1896. Mr. Wiley 
received a thorough training and experience in architecture and practi- 
cal building work in Chicago, which was his home until 1911, in which 
year he moved to East Chicago and opened an office. Mr. Wiley de- 
signed the First National Bank Building of Whiting, which is perhaps 
his most conspicuous achievement in the Calumet district. Other im- 
portant buildings of which he is architect are a bank at Dubuque, Iowa, 
a theater at Burlington, Wisconsin, and a number of lesser buildings in 
tbe Calumet region and elsewhere. 

Mr. Wiley is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
tbe Knights of Pythias, the East Chicago Club, the Commercial Club, 
and in politics is independent. 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 675 

St. Mary's Catholic Church of East Chicago. Prominent among 
the influences necessary to the highest civilization of any country are the 
church and school. Whatever success the individuals lacking these in- 
fluences may achieve, a community can never prosper without them. 
St. Mary's Catholic Church of East Chicago, of which Father George 
Lauer is pastor, has performed a notable service both in religion and in 
education in that community, and a brief sketch of the church and parish 
have an appropriate place in the history of the Calumet region. 

It was Father II. M. Plaster who built the first church in 1889 at a 
cost of $3,500, he bought six lots from the East Chicago Land Company 
for $900, the company donating three other lots. Father Plaster as the 
first pastor celebrated the first mass in the old Tod Opera House. 
Ceneral Torrence, who was such a prominent figure in the founding and 
upbuilding of Hammond and East Chicago, donated the first bell, which 
had originally belonged to the first public school, the sehool building 
subsequently becoming the city hall. Father John Tremmel, who was 
assistant to Father Plaster, succeeded him in the parish when the latter 
moved to Plymouth. Indiana, and Father Tremmel was succeeded by 
Father Lenz, who after four months was followed by Father M. J. 
Byrne. Father Byrne was the first stationary pastor, St. Mary's having 
up to that time been a mission. He remained two years and was then 
transferred to the Sacred Heart parish at Whiting. Once more St. 
Mary's became a mission and was served by Father Byrne once a 
month, he making the trip from Whiting in a buggy. Father S. Kobelin- 
ski, who had charge of St. Adalbert's parish at Hammond, was the next 
missionary priest at St. Mary's, and after him came Father H. Kappel, 
who was assistant at St. Joseph's of Hammond, but remained only three 
months. 

The record thus far brings St. Mary's up to the year 1898. At that 
time there were only about twenty-four families in the parish, and some 
of them are still there, including J. S. Reiland, Edward King, Mrs. M. 
Flack, Andrew O'Girr, Freman Fife, Mrs. Harry Smith, Peter Whelan, 
Sr., James Durkin. Joseph French, Sr., Thomas Kennedy, Henry and 
Elmer Bourque. 

In February, 1899. Father George Lauer took charge of St. Mary's. 
He had confronting him a heavy responsibility, since the parish had 
never been in a flourishing condition, and in the past fifteen years he has 
practically founded and built from the ground up the flourishing church 
organization now represented by St. Mary's. At the beginning he had 
about thirty families, twenty-two children in the Sunday school, and 
practically no services had been held there for three years. A debt of 
$2,700 increased the difficulties of his pioneer work. The first bill paid 
out was $165 for street improvements on Forsyth Avenue. The people 
living within the parish limits promised him their support, and through 
a bazaar the sum of $1,078 was netted. The priest's house was built, but 
later was converted into a sisters' convent. At the same time additions 
were placed on the church at a cost of $950. St. Mary's first organist 
was Mrs. A. P. Brown, and assisted by Catherine and Ella Sheets and 
Carrie Reiland as singers. The following year Josephine Flack took the 
organ, and four years later was succeeded by Miss Eva Kennedy, and 
her long service of eight years was followed by that of Miss Lillian 
Artibey, the present organist. 

In 1901 the schoolhouse was built, a two-story frame building 



676 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

40x52 feet, costing $2,350 and located just north of the church. The 
fall of 1901 saw 170 children in attendance under the charge of the 
►Sisters of Providence of St. Mary of the Woods of Indiana, near Terre 
Haute. At the present time St. Mary's parish comprises ahout one 
hundred and sixty families or 850 souls. There are five teachers 
in the school, instruction runs through eight grades, and the very 
highest standards of scholastic work are maintained. A new rectory for 
the priest was huilt in 1902, and his old home given to the sisters. About 
the same time five additional lots were purchased at a cost of about two 
thousand dollars. The present rectory cost $6,500. Another item in the 
financial record of the church is that during the last ten years about 
forty-five hundred dollars have been paid out for street improvements 
around the church and school grounds. 

On May 17, 1913, construction was begun on a new schoolhouse, and 
it was finished in October, containing eight class rooms and a large 
auditorium with stage, capable of seating 350 pupils, heated by steam, 
and has all modern improvements. At the same time the rectory was 
changed to a sisters' convent, and the priest now resides in a temporary 
flat which has been fitted up in the school building. The total cost of 
the schoolhouse was $24,300. 

During the past year through the efforts of the Willing Workers 
Society the church funds have been increased by the sum of $9,850. 
Mrs. Charles Dewey was chairman in 1913 of the Willing Workers, and 
was also sub-chairman of three* other circles, and with other prominent 
women members of the parish has secured the greater part of the means 
by which the many improvements have been effected. One feature of 
the varied activities of the parish in which Father Lauer is particularly 
interested is the Dramatic Club. 

Father George Lauer was born at Fort Wayne, Indiana, August 24. 
1872, received his early education in St. Mary's school of that city, and 
after finishing there in 1886 entered St. Lawrence College at Mount 
Calvary, controlled by the Capuchin Fathers and located near Fond du 
Lac, Wisconsin. He completed the course in 1891, and concluded his 
theological studies in St. Mary's of the West at Cincinnati in 1896. His 
ordination as a priest occurred on June 30, 1896, and he said his first 
mass July 5th of that year at St. Mary's at Fort Wayne. His successive 
stations as a priest or assistant have been at Goshen, Indiana, Earl Park, 
La Porte, in the Cathedral at Fort Wayne, at Avilla, Indiana, at Rome 
City, was then stationed at Ligonier and had charge of the Kendallville. 
Wawaka and Millersburg missions. Following this he was sent to St. 
Joseph's at Hammond as temporary assistant, and at the same time was 
given charge of the East Chicago Church of St. Mary's, and his energies 
have since been directed to the latter charge, with what fruitful success 
has already been described. 

Father Lauer 's father is Justin Lauer, a native of Germany, and now 
sixty-six years of age. The mother's maiden name was Gertrude Wyss. 
She is a native of Indiana and of Swiss ancestry and now sixty-two years 
of age, and both live in the old home at Fort Wayne, being among the 
oldest members of St. Mary's Church in that city. Father Lauer 's 
brother Nicholas is a contractor at Fort Wayne, and married Margaret 
Happ of that city. They have three children. Father Lauer also has 
three sisters, as follows: Gertrude, now Mrs. Oscar Sprenger, of Port 
Clinton, Ohio, where the husband is engaged in tailoring and they have 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 677 

four children ; Matilda, widow of Joseph Neuman, and living at Elyria, 
Ohio ; and May, who is single and living at home. 

Father Lauer is a devoted churchman, has made his life one of benefi- 
cent service, and in East Chicago is esteemed both as the leader of a 
great church organization and as a citizen interested in every movement 
for the improvement of his community. 

Clarence 0. Sefton. A lawyer of broad experience and successful 
practice at Gary is Clarence 0. Sefton, who has been identified with 
the Gary bar since 1907. 

Born in Louisville, Illinois, December 9, 1876, Clarence 0. Sefton 
had the inestimable advantage of being born in the country and reared 
in the wholesome environment of an Illinois farm. His parents were 
James S. and Elizabeth (Golden) Sefton, and they represented pioneer 
families in Illinois. His early life was divided between the planting 
and harvesting labors of the farm, and attendance at the' local schools, 
and his ambition early led him to seek those opportunities which lie 
above the plane of commonplace effort. His education was acquired 
in the Orchard City College, Austin College, and in 1905 he graduated 
from the law department of Valparaiso University. In the meantime 
seven years had been spent as a teacher, and his earnings from the 
schoolroom defrayed most of his expenses during the time he was fitting 
himself for law practice. His first year as a lawyer was spent at his 
native village of Louisville, followed by one year in South Bend, Indiana, 
and in 1907 he came to Gary. Mr. Sefton, in 1912, was democratic 
candidate in Lake County for the office of prosecuting attorney. His 
popularity in the county and the aggressive campaign which he made, 
resulted in his receiving 2,400 votes more than the normal democratic 
strength, and while he failed of election, it was a gratifying compli- 
ment to his personal standing. He has been unswerving in his loyalty 
to the democratic party. 

Allen P. Twyman. The legal profession of the Calumet region has 
one of its ablest representatives in Allen P. Twyman of East Chicago, 
and his position in that community as a rising young lawyer is already 
well established. His work has given much promise of distinctive 
achievement, and his service as temporary incumbent of the office of city 
judge a year or so ago is especially remembered to his credit. 

A Kentuckian by birth, Allen P. Twyman was born at Louisville, 
December 9, 1885. His parents are Buford and Bettie (Piatt) Twyman. 
His father was also an attorney, one of the older members of the Louis- 
ville bar, and died in 1901. 

Allen P. Twyman grew up in Louisville, was educated in the public 
schools, and early in life found a position as deputy circuit clerk in the 
Jefferson County courthouse at Louisville. His six years' service in that 
office gave him a wide knowledge of public affairs, and prefaced his study 
of law. Mr. Twyman graduated from the Jefferson School of Law at 
Louisville in 1910, and the following year was spent in the Louisville 
Title Company. On May 1, 1911, he arrived in East Chicago, and has 
since been associated in practice with Mr. Ottenheimer. For five months 
of 1912 he served as city judge. He has membership in the Lake County 
Bar Association, is affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, belongs to the Commercial Club and in politics is a democrat. 



678 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

Mr. Twyman on May 21, 1912, married Agnes F. Meihle, of Ham- 
mond. They have two sons, Buford M. and Hugh Allen. 

Goldschmidt Detinning Company. A business that is considered 
one of East Chicago's growing and prosperous firms and supplies an 
important industry to the city is the Goldschmidt Detinning Company. 
Its business is based upon the chemical process of separating the tin and 
steel contained in the waste of can factories, and manufacturing the 
separate metals into pig tin and scrap steel. It is an industry that has 
grown up through the utilization of formerly waste products, and the 
East Chicago plant is one of three operated by the Goldschmidt Detin- 
ning Company, which has its head offices on Wall Street in New York. 
The discoverer of the process of detinning was Dr. Hans Goldschmidt, 
a German scientist of Essen, Germany, who secured patents on various 
processes for detinning. The Goldschmidt Detinning Company now 
operates under his patents. The president of the company is William 
Graham, formerly president of the American Can Company. Besides 
the East Chicago plant there are two others at Detroit, Michigan, and 
Chrome, New Jersey. The company in its present form was organized 
in 1908. 

The business at East Chicago was started in 1911. The plant has a 
site of fifteen acres, and operations were begun in 1912. About one 
hundred and fifty men are employed, and 30 per cent of them are 
skilled labor, the most important department of the plant being a large 
chemical laboratory. The company uses electric power, and it is claimed 
that the equipment for power distribution is the best found in any 
factory in the state. 

The local officers are Charles Lindmueller, superintendent ; J. Gens- 
heimer, assistant superintendent ; C. A. Anderson, chief clerk ; and H. 
E. Biedinger, mechanical engineer. Mr. Lindmueller is a graduate of 
the Case School of Applied Science at Cleveland, is an expert chemist, 
and is largely responsible for the successful operation of the local busi- 
ness. On February 22, 1910, he married Miss Catherine Johnstone, a 
native of Warsaw, Illinois, and they have one child, Elizabeth, now four 
years of age. He has membership in the Commercial Club, the Ham- 
mond Country Club, the American Chemical Society and is one of the 
leading men in industrial affairs at East Chicago. 

The E. B. Lanman Company. The products that are shipped out 
from the East Chicago plant of this concern comprise wrought washers, 
special steel stampings and a number of specialties in carriage hard- 
ware. The business is a large one, employs about one hundred persons, 
and the factory is a two-story building 80x200 feet. Its mechanical 
equipment is of the very best, and electric power is employed. 

The industry was started in 1880 at Columbus, Ohio, by the late E. B. 
Lanman, after whose death in 1897 the company was incorporated under 
its present title. E. B. Lanman is president and C. B. Lanman, secre- 
tary and treasurer. In April, 1912, the company acquired 3^ acres of 
factory grounds in East Chicago, and the plant was put up during 
1912-13. It has unusual shipping facilities, with ready access to the 
Pennsylvania, the Indiana Harbor Belt, the Wabash, the Elgin, Joliet 
& Eastern and the Baltimore & Ohio tracks. The products go all over 
the United States, and the plant has a capacity of 200 tons of washers 
per month, besides its other products. 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 679 

E. B. and C. B. Lanman were both born in Columbus, Ohio, and C. 
B. Lanman is a graduate of Harvard University. E. B. lives at Indiana 
Harbor. He married Ethel Weyant, and they have two children, 
Georgiana B. and E. B., Jr. Mr. E. B. Lanman is a member of the 
Hammond Country Club. 

William E. Warwick. The Standard Oil Company at Whiting as 
the nucleus of that city's power and influence as an industrial center, 
has always furnished the city some of its most progressive and public- 
spirited citizens. Among these are Mr. William E. Warwick, who has 
been connected with the refining plant since its establishment, and has 
rendered important public service as mayor and in many other ways to 
the growing community. 

William E. Warwick was born in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, January 13, 
1862. After his graduation at the Iowa State College in 1888 with the 
degree Mechanical Engineer, he soon came to Whiting, and in the fall 
of 1889 became a draftsman in the office of the Standard Oil Company, 
which was then beginning construction work for the great refinery. For 
ten years Mr. Warwick was head of the paraffine department, was ad- 
vanced to the position of assistant superintendent of the plant in 1903, 
and is now active superintendent. Mr. Warwick is also one of the 
officials of the First National Bank of Whiting. 

In 1893 he married Ella Fredenberg, of Evanston, Illinois. Frater- 
nally he is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the 
Masonic lodge, belongs to the Hammond Country Club and in politics 
is a democrat. A distinction that will always attach to his name in the 
annals of Whiting as a municipality is the fact that he was chosen the 
first mayor after the incorporation of the city. As mayor Mr. Warwick 
served from 1903 until 1907 and under his supervision many of the 
important improvements were inaugurated and completed. 

Harry W. Sommers. To the local and traveling public at Gary, 
Harry Sommers has for the past four years been known as the popular 
and able landlord of the Gary Hotel, the best place of accommodation 
and entertainment of its kind in the city. Mr. Sommers has had a long 
and thorough experience in all the departments of hotel management, 
and his experience has enabled him to meet the wants of the traveling 
public so successfully that the Gary Hotel has few equals in the Calumet 
region. 

Born at Germantown, a suburb of Philadelphia, November 11, 1872, 
Mr. Sommers is a son of Harry W. and Angeline Sommers, and his 
father was also a popular hotel man. In 1892 Harry Sommers, after a 
public school education and considerable training in hotel work, went to 
Chicago and was employed as assistant steward in the Virginia Hotel, 
and later became steward of the Metropole in the same city. For two 
years Mr. Sommers was superintendent of the dining car system on the 
Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railway. This was followed by nine years as 
assistant manager of the Kimball House at Davenport, Iowa, a hotel of 
which his father at that time was manager. From 1899 to 1902 he was 
in charge of the Hotel Sommers at Moline, Illinois, and next became 
superintendent and manager of the Anthony Wayne Club at Fort 
Wayne, Indiana. When Mr. Sommers left the Anthony Wayne Club 
its members, in token of his efficient services, presented him with a beau- 
tiful loving cup. He came to Gary in 1910, and has since been proprie- 



680 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

tor of the Gary Hotel, a well built and equipped hostelry with fifty 
rooms, and maintained with the best of facilities and service for its 
guests. 

Mr. Sommers on April 19, 1897, married Clara Kehoe, of Davenport, 
Iowa. Their two children are Claire and Harry W., Jr. Mr. Sommers 
is a popular member of the Gary Lodge of Elks, is a member of the 
house committee in the Commercial Club and in politics is independent. 

J. Kalman Reppa engaged in the practice of law and in real-estate 
and insurance business, is also secretary of the Twin City Savings and 
Loan Association, an institution organized September 2, 1914, with a 
capital of $500,000. Mr. Reppa is one of the younger business men of 
East Chicago. He has had a successful experience in banking, and 
his general business qualifications are unmistakable and have brought 
him to a substantial position when most men are struggling for an open- 
ing in the world of affairs. 

J. Kalman Reppa was born in Austria, February 1, 1886, a son of 
John and Anna Reppa. His father was a school teacher by profession, 
and brought the family to Whiting, Indiana, in 1903, but now lives retired 
in East Chicago. 

J. Kalman Reppa received a very high education; he finished pub- 
lic school under his father, and at the age of ten, started the gymnasium 
(college) in Budapest, where he took a five-year course. At the age of 
fifteen he was admitted to the State Preparandium of Znio, Austria, 
and before leaving Europe, graduated from same. He was eighteen 
when he took up his new home in Amei'ica, and in 1904 received a diploma 
as a professor of mathematics in the public schools of Austria. After 
coming to this country he took a commercial course in St. Joseph's Col- 
lege, at Rensselaer, Indiana, and from the age of twenty-one his expe- 
rience was exclusively identified with banking, until March, 1914, when 
he started in the real-estate and insurance business. In 1907 Mr. Reppa 
began work for the First National Bank of East Chicago, and in 1908 
came to Indiana Harbor and was taken on the staff of the Citizens Trust 
and Savings Bank. In 1910 he became cashier of the First Calumet 
Trust and Savings Bank of East Chicago, and resigned that office to 
devote himself to the increasing responsibilities of an independent career 
in other lines. In the meantime he took up the study of law, being ad- 
mitted to the bar in November, 1914. 

Mr. Reppa was married on September 5, 1910, to Verna B. Benyo- 
vitz, of Houtzdale, Pennsylvania. They are the parents of two children : 
Kalman and Vernon. Mr. Reppa is a member of the Foresters, the 
Knights of Columbus, the Catholic Church, and is one of the most promi- 
nent leaders in local politics. 

Andrew Volcsko. Seventeen years ago Andrew Volcsko came to 
America, a new immigrant, with practically no knowledge of the English 
language and American customs, and started work as a common laborer 
in the steel mills at Braddock, Pennsylvania. He is one of the men of 
fine birth and training who in the melting pot of America have devel- 
oped as successful men in the new world, and he has for several years 
been one of the successful prosperous business men of Gary. 

Born in Hungary, February 22, 1877, he came to the United States 
in 1896, and spent the first ten years employed in the steel mills and 
machine shops at Braddock, Pennsylvania. For several years he was 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION €81 

with the Westinghouse Company. For a short time he was in the ma- 
chine shops of the B. & O. Railway Company, and finally returned to 
Braddoek and engaged in the grocery business. Mr. Volcsko has been 
a resident of Gary since 1907, and was one of the early real estate deal- 
ers to locate in the new city. He has bought and sold large quantities 
of local property, enjoys the thorough confidence of all classes of 
citizens, and his success has been well won. 

In November, 1899, he married Barbara Hugyak. They are the 
parents of four children, three sons and one daughter. Mr. Volcsko 
votes independently in politics and is one of the live members of the 
Gary Commercial Club. 

The Petrolene Company. A somewhat unique industry in the 
Calumet region is the Petrolene Company of Whiting. Its chief product 
is oil cloth, and the factory in Whiting is said to be the only one west 
of the Allegheny Mountains. It was established in 1902 and the busi- 
ness was incorporated under its present title in 1903. The partners in 
the original enterprise were J. E. Wadsworth and Starr Stowell. Its 
first title was Elarite Paint Company, but on February 27, 1903, the 
present corporate title was adopted. The company has a group of well 
constructed and thoroughly equipped factories, warehouses, power 
plants and offices, and though early in its career the company lost heav- 
ily by fire, its flourishing business transactions have given it class among 
the most substantial industries of the Whiting district. The company 
began in 1903 with only 284 feet of floor space, and at the end of seven 
years the area devoted to the various departments had increased more 
than eighty times over the original. In the past four years the output 
has more than doubled, and the buildings have been increased by the 
erection of a warehouse, two machine rooms and a storeroom. 

In 1905 the company began the manufacture of floor cloth, and this 
is now the distinctive product of the company, and the demand for the 
output is such that it is shipped to all parts of the United States and 
also to Canada. The trade mark Petrolene now has a standard signifi- 
cance among all dealers in oil cloth. The process of manufacture simply 
stated begins with burlap, specially imported from Scotland, which 
serves as the base upon which paints and varnishes and other filling are 
applied, through a long process of machinery drying, baking and print- 
ing until the finished product is ready for shipment in bolts or rolls, 
each containing fifty lineal yards of cloth. Most of the output is now in 
printed floor cloth, and the most popular brand is that in which a natural 
wood design is printed, giving an excellent imitation of oak wood. 

The officers of the company are F. N. Gavit, president ; L. II. Mattern, 
vice president ; Starr Stowell, secretary ; and F. J. Smith, treasurer. 

Starr Stowell, who was one of the originators of this important in- 
dustry, like many successful men, was born on a farm. His birth oc- 
curred in 1868 at Coldwater, Michigan, and when he was twelve years 
of age his parents moved to a farm near Valparaiso, Indiana. He 
received a public school training, had more than a satisfying share of 
hard labor, and finally left the farm and came to Whiting in 1898. He 
was engaged in the grocery business there under the firm name of 
Stowell & Shafering for three years, but ill health compelled him to re- 
turn to the old homestead, and he lived there until the death of his 
father. In 1903, returning to Whiting, he gave all his energy to the 



682 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

business which has been above described. He now stands as one of the 
leaders in the Whiting business community. 

Mr. Stowell in 1901 married Mabel Lee, and they are the parents of 
two children. Mr. Stowell is affiliated with Whiting Lodge No. 613, 
A. F. & A. M., with the Elks No. 1273, and also has other relations with 
social and fraternal orders. 

Tittle Bros. Packing Company. It is in the handling of the neces- 
sities of common life that Tittle Bros. Packing Company of Gary has 
developed a business second to none of its kind in the Calumet region. 
Nothing is more important than the feeding of the people, and to supply 
good food to a community is a more important service than can be ren- 
dered through any of the professions, and is deserving of the very best 
efforts and enterprise of which men are capable. The Tittle Bros. Pack- 
ing Company has its headquarters at 624 Broadway. The company was 
founded in 1907 by Joseph and Frank Tittle, who were the first meat 
and grocery dealers on Broadway. The record of the company is one of 
progressive growth from small beginnings, though their first store was 
fully in keeping with the City of Gary as it existed seven years ago. 
They first sold goods from a small building at 640 Broadway, but their 
trade in a short time had outgrown the capacity of their quarters, and 
they moved into a larger place, and nearly every year has seen some 
important extension or new branches established. The main store now 
occupies space 50x100 feet, and they also own and operate a store at 
528 Broadway, in a building 25x100 feet, another at Fifth Avenue 
and Harrison Street, 50x80 feet, and the company own the meat and 
grocery department in the Boston Department Store. The firm is 
incorporated at a capital stock of $30,000, all paid up, and do an 
extensive wholesale and retail business, employing thirty-six clerks and 
managers, besides a number of delivery wagons in its service. The 
officers of this company are : Joseph Tittle, president ; Fred Tittle, vice 
president ; James A. Tittle, secretary ; and Frank Tittle, treasurer. Be- 
sides the local trade in Gary and immediate vicinity, their service is 
extended to Michigan City, Indiana Harbor, and other communities in 
the Calumet region. The firm own considerable property in the City of 
Gary. 

A little more than twenty years ago Joseph Tittle came, a poor boy 
from a foreign land, to try his fortunes in the new world. The brief 
outline of the Tittle Bros. Packing Company shows how well he has 
realized his ambition. He was born in Bohemia in 1877, came to the 
United States in 1891, had already acquired such training in books as 
he needed for a business career, and after spending several years in 
Chicago, he made his first independent venture as a farmer out in Min- 
nesota. Two years of that experience was apparently enough to satisfy 
him, since he returned to Chicago and went into the meat business. Mr. 
Tittle has had experience in practically every department of the meat 
and grocery trade, and has filled all the positions from a cutter at the 
retail block to president of a concern which supplies goods to thousand* 
of people. Selling out his interests in Chicago, Mr. Tittle came to Gary 
in 1907, and has since been at the head of the enterprise above sketched. 

Mr. Tittle married Bertha Tagl, who was also a native of Bohemia. 
Their four children range in ages from fourteen to about two years. 
Mr. Tittle affiliates with the Masonic Order, the Benevolent and Protec- 
tive Order of Elks, belongs to the Gary Commercial Club, is a republican 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 6S3 

in politics, and served on the advisory board during the construction 
of the Mercy Hospital in Gary. 

Charles T. Bailey. Here is a name that has been identified with 
Lake County and northern Indiana for three-quarters of a century. It 
has become honored and respected through long years of successive in- 
dustry, business integrity and Christian and moral character. Few fam- 
ilies have been longer established and none have borne their part in 
community affairs with greater credit to themselves and with more prac- 
tical usefulness to the community than the Baileys. 

The first and chief representative of the name in Lake County was 
the late Josiah B. Bailey, who was for many years one of the most reliable 
and substantial citizens of West Creek Township, and who passed away 
November 25, 1902. He was born at Door Village in LaPorte County, 
Indiana, October 23, 1835. He lost his father in childhood, and then 
made his home with his grandfather, who finally settled in Lake County, 
and they all had a share in the early development of this wilderness. 
Josiah B. Bade}' during his lifetime was regarded as one of the largest 
hand holders in Lake County, and while this indicates his thrift and 
business foresight, it was also the consensus of opinion in his community 
that few men better deserved success, since, he was eminently public 
spirited, charitable, and a helpful cooperator in every community enter- 
prise, josiah B. Bailey was married in March, 1857, to Nancy Kile, who 
was born February 22, 1838, and died April 18, 1876. Their children 
were Levi E., Charles T., Grace and George B. Josiah B. Bailey in 1877 
married Mrs. Amelia Sanger. 

Any mention of the Bailey family would be incomplete without ref- 
erence to Reuben Chapman, who was one of the earliest pioneers of Lake 
County, having come from Connecticut by canal and lake and on foot 
in 1836. His first shanty was located on an Indian trail, and it is said 
that he rafted the timber for the erection of the first sawmill at Momence 
on the Kankakee River, and also the first grist mill. Reuben Chapman 
married the widowed mother of Josiah B. Bailey, and was in the truest 
sense a grandfather to the Bailey children. He had an honored and use- 
ful place in Lake County while he lived, and his memory is revered by 
those still living. He was" generous, high-minded and industrious, and 
it was through his efforts that Josiah B. Bailey got his start in life. At 
the age of eighty Grandfather Chapman was killed by the fall of a tree 
he had cut with his own hands. 

Charles T. Bailey, who now continues the honored name of his fam- 
ily, was born during a brief residence of his parents in Kankakee County, 
Illinois, April 12, 1862. Soon after his birth the family returned to Lake 
County, where he was reared and educated in the schools of West Creek 
Township. His father owned over a thousand acres and gave to Charles 
260 acres as his start in life, and he subsequently added 233 acres and 
for many years has been regarded as one of the most successful stock 
raisers in Lake County. He has made a specialty of Hereford cattle 
and Shropshire sheep. He also bred coach horses for a number of vears. 

On April 23, 1888. Mr. Bailey married Tillie E. Grimes, of Kankakee 
County, Illinois, who died January 3, 1898, leaving two sons and two 
daughters. These children are Barbara May, W. Ray, Earl J. and Hilda 
Grace, the oldest twenty-five and the youngest twenty. All have finished 
the courses of the high school and May is a graduate of the University of 
Indiana and now one of the instructors in the Crown Point High School. 



684 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

Hilda holds a teacher's certificate as an instructor in music, and is now 
a student at Northwestern University. The boys are active assistants of 
their father on the farm. On September 4, 1899, Mr. Bailey married for 
his second wife Miss Esther Starkweather of Michigan, in which state 
she finished her education in Romeo public schools. 

At one time the postoffice was located on Mr. Bailey's land and was 
known as Lanthus, and that name is now retained as the title of Mr. 
Bailey's homestead, which is called the Lanthus Stock Farm, C. T. Bailey 
& Sons, proprietors. The farm is noted among raisers of Hereford cattle 
and Shropshire sheep. Mr. Bailey has been active in local affairs, and 
at the election just held was elected to the county office of councilman- 
at-large. He is a republican, lias served as road commissioner and is 
now on the township advisory board and one of the men most active in 
the erection of the Lowell High School. He is a member of the West 
Creek Methodist Church. This was the first organized church in Lake 
County, and in early days its building was used as a schoolhouse, where 
Josiah B. Bailey and his sister Mary were both scholars. Mr. Bailey is 
one of the prosperous farmers of Lake County who enjoys automobiling 
and through his enterprise is able to maintain a first-class car. The 
family take a number of trips during the summer season in the car, and 
enjoys hundreds of comforts and luxuries which were undreamed of by 
their forefathers when they settled in this section of northern Indiana. 

The Gary Evening Post. J. Ralph Snyder. Now commanding one 
of the influential places among the newspapers of the Calumet region, 
the Gary Evening Post was established in 1909, and owes its origin to 
Mayor Thomas E. Knotts. It was started as a stock company, and 
in February, 1910, J. R. and II. B. Snyder bought the controlling in- 
terest, Mr. J. Ralph Snyder is business manager, and II. B. Snyder 
is managing editor. They are not only live and capable newspaper 
men, but are two of Gary's progressive younger citizens. The Post 
has a circulation of more than four thousand, is issued in form from 
eight to sixteen pages, and besides a thorough organization to cover 
the local news department, has the International News dispatches, 
the Hearst service. The Post Building, completed in October, 1913, 
is one especially designed for a home to a newspaper and publishing 
plant and the Post now has the largest and best equipped newspaper 
and job printing plant in Northwestern Indiana. The press of the 
Post has a capacity of 25,000 two to sixteen-page newspapers each hour. 

J. Ralph Snyder and H. B. Snyder were born at Waverly, Ohio, 
sons of H. R. and Minerva (Burgess) Snyder, who now live in Gary. 
Their father is a veteran newspaper man, and for years was identified 
with various papers in the state of Ohio. He was whole or part owner 
of the Dayton Journal, the Piqua Call, the Marion Mirror, the Urbana 
Citizen, and various other publications in Ohio, and for a time was 
proprietor of the Springfield Republican of Springfield, Missouri. 
There were four children in the family, as follows: II. R., Jr., who is 
advertising manager of the Gary Evening Post; Mrs. Oliver Starr, of 
Gary, II. B. and J. R. 

Mr. J. R. Snyder had a public school education, and was also a stu- 
dent in Drury College at Springfield, Missouri, and the Ohio State 
University at Columbus. His brother, H. B., is a graduate of Yale Uni- 
versity with the class of 1908. Both the Snyder brothers are vigorous 
and alert young newspaper men, have been thoroughly trained in the 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 685 

business, and conduct a clean and enterprising paper for the benefit 
of Gary and the vicinity. 

J. R. Snyder in 1910, married Edith Turner of Urbana, Ohio. 
Besides his newspaper work he has given considerable attention to local 
affairs, and in April, 1912, was appointed to the office of city clerk, 
which he held until the expiration of his term, January 1, 1914. Fra- 
ternally he is affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, is a member of the Commercial Club, the University Club and 
the Country Club, and his church is the Methodist. In politics he sup- 
ports the democratic party. 

Hon. Willard B. Van Horne. With offices and practice as a leading 
lawyer at Indiana Harbor, since 1902,, Mr. Van Horne has prestige as one 
of the ablest lawyers in Lake County ; a man of fine intellectual and profes- 
sional attainments, he has been an influential factor in connection with po- 
litical affairs, and his sterling character and genial personality has gained 
him unqualified popularity. He is present representative from his district 
in the State Legislature, and all his work in public office has increased the 
confidence placed in him by the people. His career has been one in which 
he has progressed from a youth of ordinary advantages and opportuni- 
ties, to a degree of well-won success though still hardly beyond the 
threshhold of settled manhood. 

Willard B. Van Horne was born at Grant Park, Illinois, June 4, 
1879, a son of George W. and Sarah (Mather) Van Home. His father 
has for many years been a competent physician and surgeon of Illi- 
nois, while the mother is now deceased. With his education acquired 
partly by attending an academic school at Hoopeston, Illinois, Mr. Van 
Horne took his degree, bachelor of science, from Valparaiso University, 
studied for two years in the Valparaiso Law School, and one year in the 
Chicago Kent College of Law. In 1902 he was admitted to the Illi- 
nois bar and selected the newly established industrial center of Indiana 
Harbor as his place for practice, in September, 1902, having been admitted 
to the bar of Indiana in June, 1901. Since then he has handled a large 
share of the more important litigation, and has become closely identified 
with the civic and material interests of Indiana Harbor. He was admitted 
to practice before the United States Supreme Court in December, 1912. 

On April 27, 1904, Mr. Van Horne was married to Laura Winslow, 
of Whiting, Indiana. Mrs. Van Home died November 15, 1909. Their 
three children are : Willard B., Jr., George W. and Helen Arene. A 
believer in the value of fraternal association, Mr. Van Horne is one of 
the leading workers, especially in Masonry, in the Calumet region. He 
is past master of East Chicago Lodge, No. 595, F. & A. M., and took the 
leading part in the organization of Indiana Harbor Lodge, No. 686, 
F. & A. M., of which he was first master. He is a member of Orak 
Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., at Hammond. He also assisted in the organi- 
zation of the Eastern Star at Indiana Harbor, and was the first worthy 
patron. His Masonic work includes Knight Templar degrees in the 
York Bite, and thirty-two degrees in the Scottish Rite, and membership 
in the Mystic Shrine. He assisted in organizing the Knight Templar 
Commandery at East Chicago. He is a charter member, and was the 
first secretary of the Knights of Pythias, at Indiana Harbor, and has 
membership relations with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 



686 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

As one of the prominent men of Lake County, Mr. Van Home has 
for a number of years been before the public as an unselfish and eager 
worker in the community interests, and in 1910, 1912, and also in 1914, 
was elected to the State House of Representatives. Mr. Van Home is 
president of the Commercial Club of Indiana Harbor and East Chicago, 
and both as representative, and in his local relations and as a private 
citizen, has manifested special interest and activity in behalf of the good 
roads movement in Lake County. 

H. D. Crawford. The leading fuel and general supply house of 
Gary is the Gary Supply Company. Something of the origin of this 
concern is told elsewhere in the sketch of C. T. Eadus, since the Gary 
Construction Company and the Gary Supply Company are both the 
outgrowth of the same capital. The Gary Supply Company has its 
yards at 1051 Broadway on ground 50x300 feet, facing Broadway 
and the Michigan Central Railway tracks. About five men are main- 
tained as the regular organization for handling the business, and as 
a prosperous growing concern its success is largely due to Mr. Crawford, 
who took charge in 1909, at which time he had his office in a little shack, 
while the prosperity of the firm is now evidenced by a substantial office 
building. Mr. Crawford is secretary and treasurer and manager, and 
through his own energies has chiefly built up the business. 

Hilary D. Crawford was born at St. Joseph, Michigan, in 1870, a 
son of Henry B. and Elizabeth Crawford. His father was for many 
years a leading attorney of St. Joseph. Like many successful business 
men, Mr. Crawford started in life to earn his way, when fourteen years 
of age, having received the advantages of the public schools, but fitted 
himself for business by practical experience. During the years from 
1893 to 1908 he was working for a hay and grain firm at Hammond. 
He became a cooper by trade, and followed that business for several 
years, finally moved to a farm in Michigan, and in 1903, engaged in 
the produce trade at Kalamazoo, which city remained his business head- 
quarters until he came to Gary, in 1903. 

Mr. Crawford was married September 5, 1891, to Maggie Webster 
of Scotts, Michigan. They have one son, Henry B., who has finished 
his education and is now a rising civil engineer at Gary. Mr. Craw- 
ford affiliates with the Modern Woodmen of America, and in politics is 
a republican. 

A. G. Gregory. The Calumet Supply Company, of which Mr. 
Gregory is active manager, does the largest wholesale and retail coal 
business, with a varied line of builders' supplies, in the city. The com- 
pany, which is an incorporated concern, was established at Gary in 
January, 1907, and Mr. C. B. Leland was the first manager, being suc- 
ceeded in 1909, by Mr. Gregory. The company have a fine office and 
yards with fifty feet of frontage on Broadway extending back several 
hundred feet along the Indiana Harbor and Wabash Railway tracks. 
In the different departments of the business twenty-five men are em- 
ployed, and besides selling coal both locally and by wholesale, they handle 
building materials, lime, plaster, cement, crushed stone, pressed brick, 
and various building specialties. Their trade extends not only through- 
out the immediate Gary district but all over the Calumet region and west 
as far as Joliet. 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 687 

A. G. Gregory, who though a young man, has made a very successful 
business record, was born in Canada in 1882, a son of George and Victoria 
Gregory. The father has been a brick manufacturer in Ontario for many 
years. The son attended the high schools and a business college at St. 
Thomas, Ontario, and after considerable experience in his father's brick 
plant went on the road to sell the product. In 1904 he transferred his 
employment to the Universal Cement Company of Chicago, and worked 
in their interests until he came to Gary about five years ago. 

He is affiliated with the Masonic Lodge, the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, and in politics is independent. 

Carl K. Schmidt. The first exclusive shoe store to be established in 
Gary was started by Mr. Schmidt early in 1907. He thus holds the posi- 
tion of being one of the pioneer merchants, and his enterprise has grown 
and extended in proportion to the development of the city about him, 
and he has an honored place in local business and civic affairs. He is 
now senior member of the Acker-Schmidt Company, a firm that was 
established April 1, 1909, by Mr. Schmidt and Walter Acker. They have 
a large store 50 feet frontage and 100 feet in depth, and occupy half of 
the basement. Their stock comprises a full line of men's furnishing 
goods, clothing, shoes and haberdashery, and they have probably the best 
trade in that line in the city. When Mr. Schmidt began business here 
seven years ago, their stock of goods occupied a space 40x20 feet. The 
firm then moved to 523 Broadway, where they had a store with eighteen 
feet frontage, and on December 16, 1912, moved to their present loca- 
tion at 561 Broadway, a location that is a landmark for the trade of 
men in this city. 

Carl K. Schmidt was born at Winona, Minnesota, in 1879, a son of 
H. G. C. and Ida M. Schmidt. His father has long been identified with 
the real estate business. With an education completed by graduation 
from the State Normal School of Winona, Mr. Schmidt gained an expe- 
rience in several lines of enterprise as a young man, and in 1904 went 
to St. Louis and was connected with a lumber firm of that city. In the 
following year he went to Chicago, and was deputy assessor of Cook 
County until 1907. In that year he came to Gary and opened a shoe 
store in the first building erected in Gary, and handling the first exclu- 
sive stock of shoes. Mr. Schmidt continued in the shoe business until 
the enterprise was enlarged by the formation of the present firm of 
Acker & Schmidt. 

On June 11, 1902, Mr. Schmidt married Helene Martin, of Elgin, 
Illinois. Their two children are Valentine and Carl, Jr. Mr. Schmidt 
affiliates with the Masonic Order, the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks and the Loyal Order of Moose, is a member of the Congregational 
Church, and politically maintains an independent stand. 

Roy G. Parry. One of the young officials connected with the Gary 
Land Company, Roy G. Parry, has lived in Gary since 1908, and before 
forming his present business relationship was in the newspaper business 
a couple of years. He is a wide-awake and enterprising citizen, and like 
the majority of Gary people always willing to go out of his way to 
promote the substantial welfare and prosperity of his community. 

Roy G. Parry is a native of Lake County, born at Crown Point, May 
2, 1883, a son of William and Annie (Gornall) Parry. His parents 
located in Lake County in 1881, and his father is a contractor and since 



688 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

coming to this country from England has been engaged in monumental 
and contracting business at Crown Point. Roy G. Parry was trained 
while a boy in the public schools, and had a few years' business experi- 
ence in association with his father. On coming to Gary in 1908. he 
became city editor of the Gary Times, and looked after the city news 
department of that paper for two years. In 1910 he was employed as 
chief clerk of the Gary Land Company. 

On September 6, 1913, Mr. Parry married Mildred L. Norton, a 
daughter of Capt. H. S. Norton, the resident manager of the Gary Land 
Company. The Parry home is at 701 Filmore Street, where he is owner 
of one of the most attractive bungalows in Gary. Mr. Parry affiliates 
with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and with the Masonic 
Order and in politics is a republican. 

Perry H. Stevens, who has been in Gary since 1908, and is inter- 
ested in several well known local companies, was born at Logansport, 
Indiana, in 1883, a son of R. D. and Clarissa D. Stevens. His father 
was in the lumber business, and the son had excellent training and is 
one of the many young college men at Gary. He finished his education 
in Lake Forest University in 1906, and then went into the lumber busi- 
ness with his father at Logansport. In December, 1908, he came to Gary, 
and besides his work as a building contractor as a member of the firm 
of Paine & Stevens, is also a member of the firm of Little & Stevens, 
being its secretary and treasurer. This firm has a large real estate busi- 
ness, and also built the Gary Furniture Company's building, the build- 
ing at 708 Broadway, and own several other vacant and improved prop- 
erties in the city. Mr. Stevens is secretary of the Logan Realty 
Company, which is developing a large acreage property on the west side. 
Fraternally he is affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, the Gary Commercial Club, the University Club, and the Y. M. 
C. A. In politics he is independent. 

Frank Callahan. The election of Frank Callahan, in 1913, as 
mayor of East Chicago, was a political choice characterized by excep- 
tional consistencies, since it elevated to the chief executive position of 
a large community, one of the men whose accomplishments in private 
business and whose varied relationship with affairs, had already thor- 
oughly justified such an honor. 

Frank Callahan was born at Flint, Michigan, December 11, 1876, 
a son of James and Ellen Callahan. His father, who is now deceased, 
was for many years a successful contractor and builder. After an edu- 
cation in the public schools, Frank Callahan learned his trade under 
the direction of his father, and was associated with the elder Callahan 
until he came to Indiana Harbor, in March, 1904. As a contractor and 
builder Mr. Callahan has a long record of successful experience in the 
Indiana Harbor District of East Chicago. Among other notable build- 
ings constructed by him and his organization, are the Commercial Club 
Building, the Methodist Church, the Christian Church, the O'Brien Block, 
the Farovid Block, the Gillette Building, the Barker Block, and many 
others, including flats and residences. The Jordan Power Plant was also 
constructed by Mr. Callahan. 

Besides his large business as a contractor, he is secretary and treas- 
urer of the Calumet Laundry, and is president of the Commercial Club 
Auxiliary Association, and was one of the organizers of the Commercial 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 689 

Club itself. It was as a democrat in politics, though more particularly 
in recognition of his eminent qualifications for the position, that Mr. 
Callahan was elected mayor of East Chicago, in 1913, and began his 
official duties on January 5, 1914. He is affiliated with the Knights of 
Columbus and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, arid his 
church is the Catholic. On April 6, 1905, he married Elizabeth Mar- 
wick, of Chicago. They are the parents of five children, all living, four 
sons and one daughter. 

H. Alschuler. The largest mercantile establishment at Gary is 
that conducted under the firm name of H. Alschuler Company. It is a 
high-class general mercantile establishment, and its successful upbuild- 
ing testifies to the truth of the saying that in concentration of effort lies 
success. Such concentration, combined with special ability for his work, 
with frugal conservation of funds at the beginning and judicious manip- 
ulation of them as they increased, Mr. Alschuler has employed with 
notable results, and though still a young man has accomplished a 
splendid success in the mercantile field. 

The H. Alschuler Company was organized in September, 1907, by 
Mr. Alschuler, and the history of the business has been one of progressive 
ascent ever since. The company leased its quarters in a building 50x125 
feet on Fifth Avenue and Broadway. In 1913, to accommodate the 
great increase in trade, the store was enlarged to a building covering the 
entire corner, 125x125 feet, with two stories and basement, all of it 
taken up by the large stock of goods handled by this department store, 
which supplies practically all the goods needed in the dry goods, cloth- 
ing and furniture lines, and for the household and for provisions. From 
sixty-five to one hundred persons are employed in the establishment and 
it is the largest and most popular emporium in Gary. 

H. Alschuler is a native of Ottawa, Illinois, where the family has 
long been prominent. In 1896 he engaged in the mercantile business at 
Waukegan, Illinois, and was a clothing merchant until he moved to 
Gary in October, 1907. Mr. Alschuler has a wife and two children and 
a fine home in Gary. 

Dr. John W. Higgins. During his long career at Crown Point, 
Dr. John W. Higgins was one of the most eminent physicians and citi- 
zens in Lake County. He was born in New York State, May 29, 1822, 
being a descendant of early pilgrims and puritans, his pilgrim ancestor, 
Richard Higgins, having landed in Plymouth Rock in 1621, while on the 
puritan side he was a descendant of Simon Sackett, who settled in 
Boston Colony in 1632. Sackett 's Harbor on Lake Ontario derives its 
name from this branch of the Sackett family. 

Doctor Higgins was graduated from the Indiana Medical College in 
1846, began regular practice at Crown Point in 1859, served as a physi- 
cian and surgeon in the Union army during the Civil war, and resumed 
practice at Crown Point in 1865. He was one of the sterling old doctors 
who practiced through all kinds of weather and answered the call of 
patients whether in town or at distant places in the country. 

Doctor Higgins died in Crown Point, April 7, 1904, when nearly 
eighty-three years of age. He married Diantha Tremper, who passed 
away in November, 1895. One of the stateliest homes in Crown Point 
is the Higgins-Youche mansion, which for many years was one of the 
centers of the county seat, and both Doctor Higgins and the late 



690 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

Julius W. Youehe died there. It is mow occupied by Doctor Higgins' 
only child, Mrs. J. W. Youehe and her son. 

Hon. J. W. Youche. In the passing of J. W. Youehe on January 
2, 1901, was closed the career of one of Indiana's leading citizens; in 
the Lake County bar was vacated the place of one of its ablest lawyers ; 
and his community was bereft of a strong character that had long occu- 
pied there a large sphere of usefulness and honor. Among the many 
tributes paid to him, one that came from an associate, declared that for 
many years Mr. Youche had easily been the leader of the bar of this 
county and a leading citizen of northwestern Indiana. 

Julius W. Youche was born March 4, 1848, in Saxony, son of Fred- 
erick William and Wilhelmine (Pfeifer) Youche. He was brought 
across the Atlantic when two years of age, grew up in the State of Ohio, 
was reared in the faith of the Lutheran Church, and after coming to 
Indiana completed a course of literary study in the University at Bloom- 
ington. It was in the capacity of a teacher that Mr. Youche came to 
Crown Point, and was principal of the local schools in 1870 when twenty- 
two years of age. He subsequently graduated as a law student from the 
University of Michigan in 1872, and then returned to Crown Point to 
begin a career as a lawyer which kept him busy for nearly thirty years 
until the close of his life. As a talented young lawyer he rose rapidly 
in his profession, was successful in his business affairs, enjoyed the use 
of one of the best law libraries in the county, and left a large estate at 
the time of his death. His district sent him to the State Senate, he 
served as trustee of the University of Indiana, and held the office of 
vice president in the Crown Point National Bank. 

The late Mr. Youche was married on January 1, 1873, to Miss Eunice 
Higgins. Their only child, Julian Higgins Youche, was born April 16, 
1883, had a high school education and also attended an academy at 
Bloomington, Indiana, and received a university training in the same 
city. After reaching years of majority he assumed active management 
of his father's large estate, and has since been employed in real estate, 
banking, and related lines of work. Mr. Youche has a number of the 
important interests in Lake County's financial affairs, and has large 
investments in East Chicago, Indiana Harbor and Whiting. He is an 
official in the Indiana Harbor Bank, the Gostlin, Meyn & Company, the 
First National Bank, the Lake County Trust & Savings Bank, all of 
Hammond, and has investments in other localities of the Calumet dis- 
trict. Mr. Youche is a member of the Chicago Athletic Club and the 
Hammond Country Club. 

Whiting Public Libraby. This is one of the institutions of which 
the City of Whiting is especially proud, and there is probably none other 
with greater possibilities for service in advancing culture and intelli- 
gence among the population that have free access to its reading room 
and book shelves. 

The Whiting Public Library Building is the result of the combined 
civic enterprise and the Carnegie fund for the establishment of libraries. 
Fifteen thousand dollars came from the Carnegie fund, and the Stand- 
ard Oil Company donated the three lots where the handsome structure 
now stands. After the library building was finished the library board 
issued bonds in the sum of $5,000, money therefrom being used for im- 
proving the grounds, sidewalks, furniture, etc. 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 691 

In this connection, in order to furnish a correct account of the origin 
of this institution, it will be appropriate to follow closely the minutes 
of the library board secretary. In 1904 a meeting of the Clean City 
Club was called for the purpose of discussing proposed civic improve- 
ments. At that meeting it was suggested that the necessity of a library 
seemed more urgent than other matters, and the secretary was instructed 
to correspond with the state commission relative to needful formalities. 
This communication brought to Whiting the commission's secretary, 
Miss Merica Hoagland, who addressed a meeting of representative citi- 
zens in Goebel's Hall, September 30, 1904, explaining the law as it 
pertained to the establishment of libraries in the State of Indiana. A 
committee of twenty-three was appointed at that meeting to carry on 
the project. The following day a sub-committee of three — G. H. Fifield, 
E. B. Green and J. D. Murphy — was appointed to present a petition to 
the mayor and common council of Whiting, asking a tax levy as required 
by law for the establishment of a library in the city. On October 14th 
the council considered the motion and carried it by unanimous vote. 
The next step was the appointment by the judge of the circuit court, 
the school board and the common council of a library board comprising 
seven members, viz: Frank N. Gavit, Eev. Charles H. Thiele, Hoyt G. 
Muffitt, William M. Greatrake, Mrs. Ada D. Davidson, Mrs. Isabella 
Curtis and Mrs. Besse E. Fifield. The members of the board having 
qualified, met November 17, 1904, for the purpose of organization, and 
elected officers as follows: F. N. Gavit, president; Rev. Charles H. 
Thiele, vice president; Besse E. Fifield, secretary. On December 12, 
the Pedersen Building was leased for library purposes, a librarian was 
engaged on December 17, her duties to begin January 1, 1905, and the 
library was opened to the public on March 22, 1905. Subsequently the 
books were removed from the Pedersen Building to the Putnam Build- 
ing, and remained there until the completion of the library in 1906. 

On January 9, 1905, a communication was received from Andrew 
Carnegie in response to a letter from President Gavit, stating his will- 
ingness to give the sum of $15,000 for the erection of a public library 
building. On May 8th the common council of the city passed a resolu- 
tion pledging at least two thousand dollars a year for the support of the 
library, and a certified copy of that resolution was sent to Mr. Carnegie, 
who then notified the board that $15,000 was on deposit with the Home 
Trust Company of Newark, New Jersey, available when the site was 
decided upon and title thereto acquired. On July 10th a deed was exe- 
cuted conveying two 40-foot lots on Oliver Street from the Standard 
Oil Company to the Whiting Public Library. On September 11th plans 
and specifications for the library building, prepared by Paul O. Moratz, 
of Bloomington, Illinois, were formally accepted by the board, and on 
the 25th of the same month the contract for erection of the building was 
let to John F. Rees, of Bloomington. The cornerstone was laid 
December 2, 1905, with appropriate ceremonies by Whiting Lodge No. 
613, F. & A. M. The opening of the library building to the public was 
on July 28, 1906, before the building had been quite completed. 

The first librarian was Miss Ellen Schaeffer, who was succeeded by 
Miss Florence Wing, who was librarian from 1907 to 1908. Miss Helen 
Calhoun served as librarian from 1908 until 1913, and since then the 
library work has been under the supervision of Miss Louise Randall, 
who is a graduate of the Library School of the University of AViseonsin. 



692 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

John C. Becker. A Hammond business man and citizen since 1890, 
Mr. Becker has grown up with this city, has earned a successful position 
in affairs, and has always been a leader, with the ability to inspire others 
with his ideas and plans, and has given valuable service to the commu- 
nity. Mr. Becker has a large acquaintance over this part of the country, 
acquired by years of travel in the wholesale grocery trade. He is an 
official in several banks and civic and social organizations, and has been 
honored with public office. 

Born in Lake County, within the limits of the present City of Gary, 
September 5, 1871, John C. Becker is a son of John and Christina 
Becker. His father was a farmer of Lake County. Both parents were 
natives of Germany, and on coming to America in 1860 landed first at 
New Orleans, and in the following year established their home in 
Chicago. That city remained their residence only a short time, and in 
1862 they moved to Tolleston, in Lake County, a village which has since 
been absorbed within the growing metropolis of Gary, and after a few 
years the parents had their home on what is now South Broadway in 
that city. 

Mr. John C. Becker attended the public schools of Lake County, and 
finished his education in the Valparaiso University. At the conclusion 
of his college career he came to Hammond, in 1890, and began his busi- 
ness career in the grocery trade. That was the chief line of his enter- 
prise until 1897. For a year he sold groceries on the road, then for two 
years was employed by the Street Car Company, managed a grocery 
house for a time, and once more went on the road in the interests of one 
of the large wholesale grocery houses. He continued as a traveling sales- 
man for nine years. Mr. Becker during his residence in Hammond has 
had many important relations with business affairs, and he is a demo- 
crat in his political affiliations. In 1903 he was elected a councilman 
from the Fifth Ward of Hammond, and continued a member of that 
body for six years. In 1908 he succeeded in overcoming the normal 
republican majority in North Township, and by forty-four votes to spare 
was one of the three democrats out of eleven in the county elected to the 
office of township trustee. His official term continued until 1914. In 
that year he was a candidate for the office of county treasurer. Mr. 
Becker is vice president of the East Side Trust & Savings Bank, of 
which he was one of the organizers. He was also on the first board of 
directors of the Citizens German National Bank. He is a member of 
the Lake County Board of Education, and while a trustee was active 
in the Indiana Trustees Association, being on the legislative committee. 
While in the city council he served as chairman of the finance committee 
and also as a member of the water committee. Mr. Becker was secretary 
of the Indiana State Trustees Association four years. He was the first 
president, an office he held two years, and is now secretary of the Ham- 
mond Gun Club, and is vice president and a member of the executive 
board of the Chicago League of Gun Clubs. Fraternally he belongs to 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Loyal Order of Moose, 
the Knigbts of Columbus, the Catholic Benevolent League of Indiana 
and has church membership in All Saints Church. 

On November 13, 1894, he married Mina Schreiber, a daughter of 
Ernest G. and Augusta Schreiber. Her father was a substantial farmer 
and later lived in the City of Hammond. To their marriage were born 
four children : Arthur Leonard, Florence Josephine, Josephine Gladys 
and Christina Claudia, but the last named died at the age of eleven years. 




&/%&*> tuhj^o 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 693 

E. Miles Norton. As a specialist in land law, Mr. Norton prob- 
ably stands in the front ranks of his profession in Northern Lake County, 
and during his practice at Gary since 1908, has enjoyed a large business 
and has made his services valuable to the people of that community. 
While skilled in the law, Mr. Norton is also a capable business man, 
and has made a splendid record of success at a time when many men 
are really at the outset of their careers. 

E. Miles Norton was bom in Cass County, Michigan, February 15, 
1879, a son of Perry and Elizabeth (Lucas) Norton. His father was 
a farmer, and it was in the country that Miles Norton grew up and 
acquired his first advantages in the way of schooling. During 1900- 
1901 he was a student at Olivet College, in Michigan, and in 1904 was 
graduated from the law department of the Valparaiso University. For 
one year he read law with Pealer & Miller, of Three Rivers, Michigan, 
that being one of the oldest and foremost law firms of the city. On April 
25, 1905, Mr. Norton was admitted before the Supreme Court of Michi- 
gan, and after a brief experience as a lawyer in his native state, came 
to Gary, in December, 1908. Since opening his first office, his business 
has grown to an extent where he is justified in maintaining two sepa- 
rate headquarters, one at 788-90 Broadway, and another at 1101 Roose- 
velt Street. His practice, besides considerable business in the intricacies 
of real-estate law, partakes of a general nature, and he has successfully 
prosecuted cases through the various courts in both civil and criminal 
trials. 

On August 21, 1906, Mr. Norton married Maude M. Hutchings, of 
Jones, Michigan. They have two children, Dana and Maxine. Mr. Nor- 
ton affiliates with the Tribe of Ben Hur, and in politics is a progressive 
republican. 

St. Stanislaus Church of East Chicago. A church whose growth 
in numbers and extension of usefulness are typical of the great develop- 
ment along other lines and in other branches of activities in the Calumet 
region is the St. Stanislaus Church of East Chicago. It is the social 
and religious center of the Polish Roman Catholic population of that 
city and is a strong and splendid institution, a fountain of spiritual 
influence and counsel, a capable factor in the education of the younger 
generation, and a power for morality and for wholesome social life. 

St, Stanislaus Church was founded in 1896, but the community had 
been visited beginning with 1888 by pastors from St. Casimir's Church 
in Hammond, Rev. Casimir Kobylinski and Rev. Peter Kahelleck. In 
1896 Father Kobylinski secured six lots on Baring Avenue and 150th 
Street, and founded the parish, the first church being a frame structure, 
80x30 feet, and erected in the same year under the supervision of Father 
Kobylinski. The number of souls at that time in the parish were about 
two hundred. 

The present church grounds were secured by Rev. John Kubacki in 
1901. and have an area of one block, 225x296 feet, fronting on Morgan 
and Forsyth avenues and 150th Street. Five lots additional, each 
25x110 feet, were secured by Father Kubacki in 1901 on Forsyth Avenue 
at a cost of about two thousand dollars. The church which stood on 
Baring Avenue was removed to its present site, after which it was en- 
larged and improved. Rev. Joseph Bolka took charge in November, 1904, 
and at a cost of $1,500 built an addition 36x30 feet to the church. The 
Rosary Society for women and St. Cecelia's choir in 1907 donated two 



694 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

side altars costing $240, and the church was also frescoed at a cost of 
$300. A lot situated some distance from the church was donated for the 
benefit of the congregation by the Bell & Hoffman Land Company. The 
building used for school purposes was erected by Father Kubacki in 
1901, a two-story frame structure 22x64 feet, at a cost of $1,800. It 
had four class rooms and would accommodate about two hundred and 
thirty children. The school was conducted then in six grades, with four 
Sisters of St. Francis in charge. The residence occupied by the sisters 
stood on the ground purchased in 1901, and is a iy 2 story frame build- 
ing constructed at a cost of about eighteen hundred dollars. In 1905 
Father Bolka expended about one thousand dollars in repairs and im- 
provements on the church property. The parochial residence also stood 
on the ground purchased in 1901, a building 22x56 feet and cost about 
two thousand dollars. In 1905 Father Bolka improved and enlarged the 
building at an expense of $2,000. 

The parish then had about two hundred and eighty families, num- 
bering 1,324 souls. St. Stanislaus Church had then the following 
societies: St. Michael, 125 married men; St. Stanislaus Kostka for 
single men with a membership of eighteen ; the Rosary Sodality for mar- 
ried women, with eighty members; and the Rosary Sodality for single 
women, numbering forty-five ; the Infant Jesus Society for children. 
with 183 members; St. Stanislaus Mutual Benefit, with fifty members. 

On June 8, 1907, Rev. Julian Skrzypinski was given charge pro tem 
during the absence of Father Bolka. From June 8, 1907, St. Stanislaus 
was under the supervision of Father Skrzypinski till March, 1909, when 
he was succeeded by the present pastor, Rev. Peter Budnik. Father 
Budnik built a school and church combined at a cost of $40,000, the 
building being 72x144 feet, with ten class rooms, and the church audi- 
torium on the main floor. Six hundred and sixty pupils are in the school. 
and attended by nine Sisters of St. Joseph. At the present writing it 
is planned to build a home for the sisters on Forsyth Avenue at a cost 
of $10,000. Since the advent of Father Budnik the membership has in- 
creased about 200 families, making the parish one of 600 families or 
about 3,500 souls. The old church has been changed into a parish hall, 
and the old school buildings are used as club rooms, equipped with gym- 
nasium and other facilities affording a place for social meetings and 
recreation. 

In 1912 Rev. Father Ladislaus Kubiak became assistant pastor, but 
after two months, owing to illness, went south, and then returned to his 
home in South Bend where he died in the latter part of December, 1912. 

Father Budnik is a native of the Province of Posen in German 
Poland, born in 1876. Brought to the United States at the age of eight 
years, his early schooling was in the parochial institutions of South Bend, 
followed by eight years at the Polish Seminary at Detroit, and two years 
in Mount St. Mary's Seminary at Cincinnati. Ordained to the priest- 
hood at Fort Wayne by Bishop Alerding in 1901, his first charge was at 
Walkerton, Indiana, for eleven months, followed by five years at Whit- 
ing, and was then at Terre Coupee, Indiana, until 1909, when he came 
to his present important duties at East Chicago. His mother resides with 
him. Father Budnik is a member of the Polish Catholic Union. 

Rev. Father Joseph A. Zielinski, assistant pastor of St. Stanislaus, 
was born in the Province of Posen in German Poland in 1881, was 
brought to the United States when three months old, the family living in 
South Bend, and his early training was received in St. Hedwig's paro- 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 695 

ehial school of that city. A few years were spent in work in a factory, 
followed by his entrance into the Polish Seminary in Detroit in 1902, the 
seminary about that time being removed to Orchard Lake, Michigan, 
where he finished his studies. He was ordained by Bishop Herman 
Joseph Alerding at Fort Wayne, June 21, 1912, and read his first mass 
in St. Casimir's Church in South Bend. On July 7, 1912, he was sent to 
East Chicago as assistant to Father Budnik. His mother now lives in 
South Bend at the age of fifty years. Father Zielinski is a member of 
the Priests Association of Fort Wayne. He is a highly cultured young 
churchman, and his special interest is in the training of young men, and 
he has proved his usefulness both as a spiritual adviser and a social 
leader. One phase of the church work which has been much stimulated 
under his leadership is the Literary Society which meets twice a month 
in the school hall. 

Calumet Laundry. A business which has realized the best anticipa- 
tions of its proprietors from the point of view of profitable success and 
which has prospered largely through the standards of excellent service 
set and maintained since the beginning is the Calumet Laundry of 
Indiana Harbor, which was established in February, 1912, by the firm of 
Callahan & Schock. The plant which comprises a full equipment of new 
machinery, manufactured by the Troy Company, occupies a plant at the 
corner of Michigan and Hemlock streets, in a building 50x125 feet in 
dimensions. The service of the Calumet Laundry now covers the entire 
territory for half a dozen miles around Indiana Harbor, and about forty 
persons are employed in the various departments. There are six wagons 
which collect and deliver the goods, and collections and deliveries are 
made by agents and by means of regular train express service through- 
out the entire county. It is generally conceded that the Calumet 
Laundry has the most modern and complete equipment of any similar 
establishment in Lake County. As one fact which illustrates the extent 
of its service it may be stated that more than eighteen thousand pieces 
of family washing are collected, laundered, and delivered to customers 
every week. Among other facilities a truck is employed to bring in 
laundry from Hammond to the plant. The power is used not only to 
drive the necessary machinery but also runs a dynamo furnishing light 
throughout the plant. While the highest standards of cleanliness and 
quick service are maintained in so far as the laundry department is con- 
cerned, the management has also taken pains to insure the most sanitary 
conditions and comforts for the employes, and there is no better provided 
industry in Lake County in this respect. 

James A. Patterson. While his position and accomplishment as a 
lawyer in the Calumet district are distinctive and highly creditable, the 
career of James A. Patterson is particularly interesting for reason of 
what he had to overcome in order that he could attain his ambition to 
follow a professional vocation. 

Born in Pennsylvania, August 31, 1867, a son of William C. and Polly 
(McAlpin) Patterson, both of whom were Scotch, his father a mining 
man, James A. Patterson was brought into the world in the semi-poverty 
which is so prevalent in industrial districts, and has known the stress 
of hard labor since childhood. When he was ten years of age he began 
working in coal mines as a boy helper, and practically all the education 
and privileges he has ever enjoyed has been paid for as a result of the 



696 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

sweat of his own brow. When he was about eighteen years of age his 
father was killed in an explosion in a coal mine in Oklahoma, and thus 
in addition to the necessity of winning his own livelihood he had his 
mother to support. At the same time a gun shot took away his own left 
hand. Mr. Patterson is a man who thrives on obstacles. After his in- 
jur.v he worked for the coal miners union, took a commercial course in 
a school at Leavenworth, Kansas, and then became bookkeeper at Coal 
City, Illinois. During his early boyhood he had worked in the same 
coal mine with John Mitchell, the famous labor leader, and they were on 
a plane of boyhood intimacy for several years. Mr. Patterson worked 
for five years as a bookkeeper, and then invested his savings in higher 
education, entering Valparaiso University in the fall of 1894, graduat- 
ing in the scientific course in 1896, and subsequently taking up the study 
of law. His later studies for the profession were pursued at Chicago, 
and in 1898 he graduated from the Chicago Law School and was admit- 
ted to the bar at South Bend, Indiana. After six months' practice at 
South Bend, Mr. Patterson moved to Hobart, taught school there for a 
time, and was one of the early lawyers to locate at Indiana Harbor in 
1902. Since then his hard work, his ability, and his successful handling 
of all classes of litigation have brought him more and more into prom- 
inence as one of the able lawyers of the Calumet district. Mr. Patterson 
maintains offices at Gary, Indiana Harbor and Hammond. 

It was in recognition of his exceptional qualities as a lawyer that 
led to his election in 1912 to the office of prosecuting attorney for the 
thirty-first judicial circuit, and he still handles the business of that im- 
portant office. Mr. Patterson is a republican in politics, and fraternally 
his relations are with the Masonic Order, the Knights of Pythias and 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, his wife being a member 
of the Eastern Star. During his college days at Valparaiso Mr. Patter- 
son met Miss May Wiles, who was born in Iowa and was a popular 
teacher, and on June 25, 1898, they were united in a happy marriage. 

Charles E. Bowen. The office of chief of police in such a commu- 
nity as East Chicago is one of the highest importance to all citizens and 
one of the greatest trusts with which any member of the community 
can be honored. The choice of Charles E. Bowen for that office in 1914, 
a man was selected in whom the people have the greatest confidence, and 
one whose personal rectitude, whose executive efficiency and industrial 
and commercial record will bear the closest scrutiny and tests of 
competence. 

Charles E. Bowen, who has given the greater part of his adult life 
to the iron and steel industry, was born at Arba, Indiana, December 19, 
1872, a son of L. C. and C. E. (Bunch) Bowen. His father is a miU 
worker in the steel works of the steel mills. As a boy Charles E. Bowen 
acquired a substantial education in the public schools. In 1892, at the 
age of twenty, he was employed at work in the steel mills at Muncie, 
and remained in that city until 1901. He was advanced to the respon- 
sibilities of soaking pit heater, and when he came to Indiana Harbor in 
August, 1901, Avas taken on to the staff of the steel mills in a similar 
capacity and remained with the Indiana Harbor company until 1906. 

While Mr. Bowen had demonstrated in various ways his qualifica- 
tions for official office, he was particularly well fitted for his present 
office since he possessed four years of practical experience in the lower 
grades of the police service. From 1906 to 1910 he was an active 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 697 

member of the Indiana Harbor police force and on leaving that depart- 
ment of the municipal government he was engaged in the country prod- 
uce business until 1914. Then came his appointment and the beginning 
of his duties as chief of police on January 5, 1914. 

Mr. Bowen is a democrat in politics and his fraternal affiliations are 
with the Masonic Order and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
In 1895 he married Liddie Knaff of Muncie. 

Frank Obth. Indiana Harbor grew in a little more than a decade 
from a sand waste to a closely built and populous center of industry and 
homes. Much of the early work in brick construction was performed 
by Frank Orth, and he could go about the city and point out in almost 
every block some instance of his enterprise as a building contractor. 
In ten years he has enjoyed a flourishing business and is one of Indiana 
Harbor's successful men. 

Born in Ontario, Canada, in 1867, a son of Henry and' Susan Orth, 
his father a farmer, Frank Orth spent the first sixteen years of his life 
in his native province, and in 1883 after coming to the United States 
learned the trade of brick laying. That was his regular work in a 
number of states, including Indiana, California, Florida and other points 
both east and west. Mr. Orth has been in the contracting line since 
1892, having began the business in the State of Washington. Return- 
ing to Indiana, in 1900 he engaged in business at Mathews, as both a 
contractor and brick manufacturer. The opportunities presented by 
the growing industries of Indiana Harbor caused him to move his busi- 
ness there in 1903, and his services and organization have been employed 
in many important contracts, while he has done much building on his 
own account. A number of business structures, flat buildings and 
private homes have been put up by him during the past ten years ; several 
of the churches of Indiana Harbor were also erected by him. Mr. Orth 
has made a practice of buying unimproved lots, putting up business or 
residence structures, and then renting or selling them, a feature of his 
work which has been on the whole quite profitable. 

In June, 1901, Mr. Orth married Mrs. Ella G. Taylor, of Boscobel, 
Wisconsin. By her first marriage Mrs. Orth has two children, Mrs. H. 
M. Lesh, of Chicago, Illinois; and Robert Lee Taylor, of Muskegon, 
Michigan. Mr. Orth is a member of the Royal League and Knights of 
Pythias, belongs to the Episcopal Church, is a charter member of the 
Indiana Harbor Commercial Club, and is independent in politics. "While 
his trade and building contracting has been his chief business in life, 
Mr. Orth perhaps deserves to be best known as an inventor, and has con- 
tributed several original improvements to the great technic of the indus- 
try. Several patents have been issued both in the United States and 
abroad for improvements on the open hearth furnace, and these patent 
improvements are now in use on open hearth furnaces in the United 
States and other countries. 

Lewis E. Barnes. While the business community of Hobart knows 
Mr. Barnes as a successful real estate man and dealer in coal, wood 
building materials and similar lines, it is his live enterprise as a citizen 
that makes him so vital a factor in that community. Mr. Barnes has 
for nearly six years served as trustee of Hobart Township, and anyone 
familiar with the progress of schools and good roads during that time 
needs no further evidence of his useful public spirit. As he has a 



698 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

record of progressive success in his own career, he stands for similar 
tendencies in his community. His present business was established 
at Hobart in 1909. He sells, both by retail and wholesale, tile, coal in 
carload lots, sewer pipes, building materials, and is also one of the 
leading dealers in real estate. His business organization comprises 
eight employes. Mr. Barnes has had the handling of all the large 
amount of Earl property in Hobart Township and in the Calumet dis- 
trict, and has laid out several subdivisions. 

Lewis E. Barnes was born at Wheeler, Porter County, Indiana, Octo- 
ber 27, 1875. His early education was acquired in the public schools 
at Wheeler, and as a boy he learned telegraphy and was an operator 
for fourteen years. On June 16, 1895, at Hobart, he married Agnes 
Fiester. Mrs. Barnes is one of the leading women in local club circles, 
a member of the Ladies' Reading Club, and is a graduate of the Hobart 
High School. They have three children. Mayme, aged eighteen, is a 
member of the class of 1914 in the Hobart High School ; Lola, aged six- 
teen, is in school ; and Merle, aged fourteen, is in the seventh grade. 
Both daughters are taking special musical courses. 

Mr. Barnes is an active member of the Masonic order, a member of 
the Mystic Shrine, and of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 
His substantial qualities of public-spirited citizenship are more promi- 
nent than his activities as a republican, though he has long been promi- 
nent in his party. In November, 1908, Mr. Barnes was elected township 
trustee. During his administration the splendid new addition to the 
high school building was constructed, making the Hobart consolidated 
schoolhouse one of the most commodious and best equipped school 
structures in Lake County. The contract was let in May, 1910, and the 
building completed in September of the same year, at a cost of $35,000. 
Also under his administration a new school building at Miller was con- 
structed at a cost of about $15,000. Mr. Barnes as trustee gave active 
supervision to the installation of the heating and ventilating systems 
in the schools, to the equipment of the gymnasium in the Hobart school, 
and was the chief factor in introducing drawing and oratorical work in 
the school curriculum. Another fact which should be noted of his 
administration was his working connection with the construction of a 
sewer system in the Town of Hobart and in connecting and in building- 
new township roads. Mr. Barnes was the first to agitate the public 
library question at Hobart, and is now a member of the library board. 
The movement for the establishment of a library at Hobart was begun 
in 1913, and an appropriation of $16,000 was secured from the Carnegie 
fund. The lot has been bought, and Mr. Barnes now has in his posses- 
sion the plans and specifications for the building which will soon adorn 
the city. 

Mr. Barnes is active in outdoor sports, and especially fond of motor- 
ing. He is a baseball fan, and is well remembered as having played 
the position of catcher for the old Hobart team, which defeated all com- 
petitors. Mr. Barnes is township president of that portion of the 
Lincoln highway through Hobart Township. He is a member of the 
executive board' of the Hobart Commercial Club. As a member of the 
old Earl family Mr. Barnes has in his office a safe which is 110 years 
old and was the property of a member of that family when he first came 
to this country. He also has a collection of miscellaneous papers and 
documents of more than ordinary antiquarian interest. 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 699 

Joseph G. Van Steenbergen. Though he came to the United 
States as a young man of twenty about ten years ago, and was confronted 
with the great difficulties of accustoming himself to American methods 
as well as the English language, Joseph G. Van Steenbergen has in that 
time worked his way from an employe at a butcher's block to a position 
as one of the leading merchants of Indiana Harbor, and is now propri- 
etor of a prospering grocery and market at 3418 Guthrie Street. 

Joseph G. Van Steenbergen was born in Rotterdam, Holland, Janu- 
ary 10, 1883, a son of John and Helen (Bouman) Van Steenbergen. 
In 1903, having spent his earlier life in the schools and in an apprentice- 
ship at hard work in his native land, Mr. Van Steenbergen came to the 
United States and after locating in Hobart, Indiana, found employment 
in the butcher's trade. In 1905 he came to Indiana Harbor, and opened 
his first shop on Pennsylvania Avenue, putting in a small stock of 
groceries and also selling meats. His business grew, he gave a reliable 
service to the community, and his prosperity justified his removal in 
1909 to his present location, where he has a fine store 25x60 feet, and 
handles the best groceries and meats sold in that particular community 
of East Chicago. 

Mr. Van Steenbergen was married on January 29, 1911, to Gertrude 
Middleton, of Berlin, Wisconsin. Their one child is Gerard Joseph. 
The family have membership in the Catholic Church, and Mr. Van 
Steenbergen is associated with the community of business men in the 
Commercial Club and is a democrat in politics. 

J. S. Clark. One of the young professional men who have selected 
Indiana Harbor as their field of work is Dr. J. S. Clark, who has recently 
established himself as a dentist and has already made a good start in 
a successful career. 

J. S. Clark was born in Chicago, Illinois, January 2, 1889, a son of 
William C. and Bertha E. Clark. His father, who is now deceased, was 
for a number of years superintendent of the rail mill in South Chicago. 
Doctor Clark grew up in his home city, attended the public schools, and 
in 1913 graduated from the Northwestern University Dental College. 
In July of the same year he established his office in Indiana Harbor, and 
already has a practice which demands practically all his time. Doctor 
Clark is a member of the Lake County Dental Association, affiliates with 
the Knights of Pythias and the Royal League and the Delta Sigma 
Delta college fraternity. In politics he is independent. 

Nate Shine. One of the most popular and best know T n mercantile 
enterprises in the retail trade district of Indiana Harbor is the men's 
furnishing goods store conducted by Nate Shine, who engaged in busi- 
ness in that city in 1909. His place of business is at 3425 Michigan 
Street, and occupies a fine store room 25x65 feet, his stock comprising 
practically all lines for the furnishing of men's attire from clothing to 
haberdashery and shoes and hats. 

Nate Shine is an enterprising young merchant who was born in 
Chicago, October 27, 1885, a son of J. and Sophie (Alschuler) Shine. 
His father lived in Chicago thirty years, kept a store for men's furnish- 
ings, on Madison Street, and died in that city in 1913. He was a member 
of the Knights of Pythias and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and the four children were : Nate ; Ed, who is employed by his older 
brother at Indiana Harbor; and Leah and Annie, who live in Chicago. 



700 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

Mr. Shine has heen in active business practically all his life, since 
he started at the age of twelve to work in a store selling men's goods in 
Chicago. His education has been of a practical rather than a theoretical 
nature, and he was already thoroughly versed in mercantile affairs when 
he came to Indiana Harbor and opened his stock of goods August 22, 
1909. On the day that marked the beginning of his business career in 
Indiana Harbor, Mr. Shine married Myrtle Lewin at Chicago, a daugh- 
ter of Marcus and Lena Lewin. Her father came to Chicago fifty-one 
years ago from Germany, and was in the cigar business in that city until 
he retired in 1910. Mr. Shine and wife have one son, Leroy, aged four 
years. His social affiliations are with the Masonic order, including the 
Royal Arch degree ; he is a member of the Indiana Harbor Commercial 
Club and is an independent in politics. 

Charles P. Packer, Jr. Cashier of the Citizens Trust & Savings 
Bank of Indiana Harbor, Charles P. Packer, Jr., is a young banker with 
experience in metropolitan financial circles beginning with the time he 
left public school in Chicago, and is one of the forcible younger business 
men of the Calumet region. 

Charles P. Packer, Jr., was born in Chicago, December 26, 1882, a 
son of Charles P. and Ellen M. Packer. His father was a well known 
Chicago banker and for many years was president of the Park National 
Bank of that city. Growing up in an atmosphere of finance, with excel- 
lent home and school advantages, after finishing in the grammar and 
high schools of his native city, Charles P. Packer, Jr., in November, 
1902, entered the Corn Exchange National Bank of Chicago, and while 
with that institution acquainted himself with nearly all the practical 
details of a large metropolitan bank. He was connected with the insti- 
tution four and a half years, was teller when he left, and in 1907 ac- 
cepted the place of bookkeeper with the Illinois Trust and Savings Bank, 
and was subsequently promoted to assistant stock transfer teller. On 
July 1, 1913, Mr. Packer came to Indiana Harbor to take up his duties 
as cashier of the Citizens Trust and Savings Bank, an institution whose 
history is recorded elsewhere in this publication. 

Mr. Packer is affiliated with Kilwinning Lodge No. 311, A. P. & A. 
M., has membership in the Kenwood Club of Chicago and the Hyde Park 
Department of the Y. M. C. A., and has his home in that city, while at 
Indiana Harbor he is an active member of the Commercial Club. In 
politics his affiliation is with the progressive republicans. 

Irvin Sheaks. An Indiana Harbor business man since 1911, Mr. 
Sheaks has been identified with the Calumet region during almost all 
of his active career, and his record is one of progress from employment 
under others to a good business of his own. 

Irvin Sheaks was born in Marshall County, Indiana, October 8, 1879, 
a son of Isaac and Jane Sheaks. His father was a farmer, and the son 
grew up in the environment of the country, received the advantages of 
the public schools, and early became a worker for his own livelihood. In 
February, 1904, Mr. Sheaks went to South Chicago, and was employed 
in a wholesale produce house until 1911. In the latter year his business 
enterprise was directed to Indiana Harbor, where he opened a feed store 
at 3420 Grapevine Street. His previous long experience and his natural 
adaptability for mercantile work quickly brought him a growing busi- 
ness, and in 1912 he bought property on Michigan Avenue and the 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 701 

Indiana Harbor Belt Railway tracks, and opened a large yard for the 
eoal and general feed business. He is now considered one of the well 
established and prosperous merchants of Indiana Harbor. 

On March 4, 1899, Mr. Sheaks married Lizzie McBride. of Marshall 
County, Indiana. Their two children are Earl and Lloyd. Mr. Sheaks 
has affiliations with the Royal League, belongs to the Commercial Club, 
and in polities is a republican. 

G. H. Thompson. One of the foremost educators of Lake County is 
the present superintendent of the Hobart schools, G. H. Thompson, who 
began his career as a teacher in a country schoolroom in Kansas when a 
boy, has been identified with the Hobart schools since 1895, first as 
principal and since 1905 as superintendent. Superintendent Thompson 
is doing much to give vitality and increased efficiency to the schools ot: 
his city, and is a large contributor to the modern progress of his section 
of the state. 

G. H. Thompson was born in Southwestern Missouri in 1869. When 
a child he was taken to Montgomery County, Kansas, and his early 
training was in the country schools of that locality. At the age of 
fifteen he began a course in the Normal school at Independence, Kan- 
sas, and taught between terms to pay his tuition. After finishing the 
course at Independence Mr. Thompson came to Northern Indiana, taught 
school in Porter County two years, and then moved into Lake County, 
where for two years he was located at East Gary, and in 1895 accepted 
the position of principal of the Hobart High School. His ability com- 
mended him to the local board as their choice for superintendent of 
schools in 1905. In 1907 Mr. Thompson was awarded the degree 
Bachelor of Science at Valparaiso University. 

Since becoming identified with the Hobart schools Mr. Thompson 
has seen the corps of teachers grow from five in 1895 to twenty in 1914, 
with an enrollment of about four hundred and fifty pupils. Mr. Thomp- 
son was a decided factor in bringing about the consolidation of the 
district schools in Hobart Township. Quoting from a recent educa- 
tional report of the Lake County schools: "A unique feature of the 
Hobart Township school system is that there is not a country school 
remaining. Consolidation was begun here more than fifteen years ago, 
and the results of that movement were so satisfactory that now wagons 
bring all the school children within a territory of seventeen square 
miles to the central township school in Hobart. In this centralized 
school there are sixteen teachers, besides the superintendent, having 
charge of some four hundred and fifty children. Eleven teachers are 
required in the grade work and the others are in the high school depart- 
ment. At the beginning of this movement five teachers were employed 
in the grades and two in the high school, but the country schools then 
maintained five other grade teachers and no special work could be done 
in any of the schools. Fifteen years ago the high school was commis- 
sioned. Since then the school has not only kept pace with the changing 
standard, but has gone far beyond the requirements of the State Board 
of Education." 

It has been a particular ambition of Superintendent Thompson to 
make the Hobart schools serve as a social center, an institution of con- 
tinuous benefit to the community, besides serving its primary purposes 
for the instruction of children. Alon^ this direction he has worked to 
organize a lyceum course, called the Hobart Lyceum Society, of which 



702 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

he is president. Through this society many notable speakers and vari- 
ous entertainments are given through the year in the school building, 
and thus many people who have been away from their text books for a 
great many years are brought back within the school atmosphere. 
Mr. Thompson has also been enthusiastic to develop the athletic depart- 
ment of the school, which won the leadership in athletics among the 
county schools in 1911. The Hobart school has always ranked among 
the best in that department. Several champions in athletics, both on 
the track and on the field, have been developed since he came to 
Hobart. 

In 1895 Mr. Thompson married Bertha Stilwell of Porter County. 
The.y are the parents of seven children, three daughters and four sons. 
Ruth, the oldest girl, is now a teacher in the Hobart school, and the 
others are still students except the youngest, who is three years of age. 
Mr. Thompson affiliates with the Masonic order and with the Knights 
of the Maccabees, having held chairs in both lodges. In politics he is a 
republican, and is a member of the Methodist Church. 

Otto C. F. Seehase. The distinction of being the pioneer hardware 
merchant of Indiana Harbor belongs properly to Otto C. F. Seehase, 
whose enterprise in that locality dates from 1901. As those familiar 
with the history of Indiana Harbor will recall, it was in the summer of 
that year that the first practical work was done on the harbor and the 
breaking of the ground for the first great steel plant, which were the 
preliminary steps in the founding of this new industrial center. Mr. 
Seehase, who had for a number of years been identified with business 
at Tolleston, came on the ground at once, and with confidence in the 
future development of the site put in a small stock of hardware and has 
grown up with the city, his business having increased in proportion to 
the surrounding development, 

Otto C. F. Seehase was born at Tolleston, Indiana, March 31, 1875. 
His parents, Adolph and Matilda (Kurth) Seehase, were among the 
first settlers at Tolleston, now included within the greater City of Gary. 
The mother died in 1900 and the father is still living. With a public 
school education, and a course of study at Valparaiso University during 
1891-95, Mr. Seehase was ready for his practical career, and for several 
years was in the building contracting work at Tolleston, Whiting, Ham- 
mond and his operations covered practically the entire Calumet region. 
Moving to Indiana Harbor in 1901, he opened his hardware store, and 
in 1903, his trade having justified considerable expansion and with a 
view to making the best of the growing opportunities, he put up his 
present store building, with 165 feet of frontage and running back 123 
feet. This at the time was one of the largest structures in the business 
district. Mr. Seehase has a large stock of general hardware, paints and 
also furniture and household supplies. Besides his mercantile enter- 
prise he is a director of the Citizens Trust and Savings Bank. 

On May 29, 1900. Mr. Seehase married Matilda Saager, of Clark 
Station, Indiana. Her death occurred August 22, 1913. Of the two 
children, Otto. Jr.. died September 23, 1912, and the daughter Helen 
is now twelve years old. Mr. Seehase worships in the Lutheran Church, 
is a member of the Commercial Club and in politics a democrat. 

St. John Cantius, Indiana Harbor. This parish of Polish Cath- 
olics at Indiana Harbor was founded by Rev. Peter A. Budnik in 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 703 

February, 1906. The first building used by the parish was a two-story 
stone structure, 44x65 feet, the first floor being used for school and pas- 
toral residence, and the second floor for church auditorium. It cost 
$7,500. The original grounds comprised nine lots, seven being bought 
by Father Budnik, at a cost of $900, and two other lots were purchased 
at a cost of $1,050 by Rev. Anthony A. Stachowiak in 1907. One of the 
first improvements was the addition of a belfry at a cost of $150. The 
school was at first taught by a lay teacher, with eighty-six children, and 
in September, 1907, two Sisters of St. Francis took charge, at which 
time the attendance had increased to 150 pupils. At that time 
the number of families in the parish was 140 or 900 souls. The church 
debt was $7,000. Since then the church roll has increased to about 500 . 
families or about 2,500 souls, and there are 400 children in the school 
with six teachers in charge. 

In 1907 Father Stachowiak started to build a rectory, a frame build- 
ing, costing $5,000, located on the first and second lots, but subsequently 
removed to lots Nos. 5 and 6, and now occupied by the sisters. In 1909 
it was found that both the church and school were too small and an 
addition was constructed, 42x64 feet, at a cost of $10,000. Both chureb 
and school have used one structure, and had six class rooms until re- 
cently, two class rooms being utilized by the sisters, but since new 
quarters were provided for them those rooms were converted into class 
rooms. The building is constructed of cement blocks and the entire cost 
of the building was $17,500. New altars and pulpit have been installed, 
the center altar costing $650 and the side altars $300, and the pulpit 
$125. The statues cost $200, and thus the entire cost of the building 
including furniture and fixtures was brought up to $22,000. The prop- 
erty owned comprises seven lots on Beach Street, six lots on Cedar 
Street, with a total frontage of 390 feet. In February, 1910, another 
lot was purchased costing $375, three more lots in 1912 at a cost of 
$1,600, and the parish now has some very valuable real estate. 

In the spring of 1913, on account of the school quarters being too 
small, it became necessary to find a new location for the sisters, and the 
old rectory was consequently moved as already stated and placed upon 
a new foundation, an improvement which cost $1,250. The new rectory, 
which cost $13,500 to construct, is one of the best residences in the city, 
and is arranged with every modern convenience, has sixteen rooms, fur- 
nished in oak, and the building stands on grounds 35x60 feet, with two 
large porches, one on the front and one on the rear. Father Stachowiak 
has one assistant, Father Ignatius Gapczynski, who succeeded Father A. 
Gorek. Until a year and a half ago Father Stachowiak had the entire 
responsibility of the parish. Father Gapczynski is director of the school, 
and Sister Zita is the superior. The societies of the parish are : Sacred 
Heart, of Jesus with a membership of 100 ; St. John Cantius with about 
fifty members; St. Casimir, with about two hundred; Polish Sharp 
Shooters, with about forty; St. Joseph's, with about fifty; Falcons, about 
thirty, all these being men's societies, while the women's societies are: 
Rosary Sodality, with a membership of about sixty ; St. Rose of Lima, 
about fifty ; Blessed Virgin Mary- of Perpetual Help, fifty ; Young 
Ladies' Sodality, sixty; Holy Angels for children, 180. Among the 
older members of the church are : Basil Dolorzycki, Frank Pucka, 
Frank Zurawski. Michael Gal, August Rakowski, Joseph Grachowalski, 
and John Hyzy. 



704 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

Father Anthony A. Stachowiak was born in the Daszewice, Arch- 
diocese of Posen, Germany, May 5, 1878. In 1883 his parents brought 
him to America and to South Bend, Indiana, and six years of age at the 
time he soon afterwards started to attend St. Hedwig's parochial school, 
and on completing his elementary course in 1893 went to Detroit and 
entered the Polish Seminary of Sts. Cyrill and Methodius, taking the 
classical course for four years and two years in philosophy. In 1899 
he began his theological studies in Mount St. Mary's at Cincinnati, and 
was ordained by Bishop Alerding at Fort Wayne on May 24, 1902. His 
first mass was said in St. Hedwig's at South Bend May 25, 1902. His 
first four years as priest were spent as assistant at St. Stanislaus in 
Michigan City, and in 1906 he came as pastor of St. John Cantius at 
Indiana Harbor. When Gary was started, as a city Father Stachowiak 
had a mission in that new community, and was one of the first, if not 
the first, priest to hold divine service there, when the entire town com- 
prised only a few rough board shacks. It remained a mission until 1909. 
Father Stachowiak saw the town grow, and had every opportunity to 
grow rich had he desired to invest in local real estate. His parents are 
both living and have their home in Indiana Harbor at the rectory. At 
the beginning of his pastorate he secured eight lots for the church and 
purchased five more one year later. His has been a life of service and 
one of important achievement in the Calumet region, and probably no 
parish has had a more interesting history and has grown more rapidly 
in material prosperity and spiritual influence than that of St. John 
Cantius. His father was born in the Province of Posen in 1852 and his 
mother in 1851. He has one sister, Mary Kasha, the wife of Martin 
Kasha, of Chicago. Father Stachowiak is a member of the Polish Roman 
Catholic Union, and while his has been a busy career in connection with 
his parish, he has always manifested much interest in civic affairs and 
in the broader benevolences of his community. He is a director of the 
board of charities. 

Father Stachowiak now has under way plans for the construction of 
a new church, to cost $80,000. The building will start as soon as $10,000 
in debt has been paid off. All members of his parish who donate $25 or 
more will receive a certificate bearing a picture of the church, with the 
name of the donor inscribed. The construction of the church will pro- 
ceed by installments, the basement first, with a seating capacity of 1,000, 
and as the building progresses the basement will be converted into a 
large hall to be used for social and other purposes. The architecture 
will be of the Renaissance style. 

The assistant of Father Stachowiak is Father Ignatius Gapczynski, 
who was born in Smogulec, Poland, Germany, in 1882. In his native 
land he had a year and a half of schooling, and in 1891 came to the 
United States, his family locating at South Bend. His schooling was 
continued in St. Hedwig's school in that city from September, 1891, 
until 1897. At the close of his elementary school days, he spent five years 
in the employ of the Studebaker Company, and in September, 1902, 
began his studies in Saints Cyrill and Methodius Seminary at Detroit, 
a school subsequently removed to Orchard Lake, Michigan. At the end 
of three years he finished his course of philosophy and theology, and 
was ordained by Bishop Alerding at Fort Wayne on June 21, 1912. His 
first charge was at St. Casimir's in Hammond as assistant. He assisted 
in the organization of the congregation at East Hammond, known as 
St. Mary's, and continued his work in connection with that church until 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 705 

January 18, 1913, when he was transferred to Indiana Harbor. He is 
a member of the Polish Roman Catholic Union, of the Priests Benevolent 
Association, is a man of thorough culture and training and of broad 
ideals both in his church and in community affairs. His parents, 
Stephen and Josephine, are both living at South Bend, his father being 
fifty-eight and his mother fifty-one years of age. He has one sister in 
the convent of the Sisters of Nazareth ; his sisters Ladislaw A., and An- 
geline, and brother Stanislaus, are also in South Bend, while his oldest 
brother, John, is connected with the Grand Union Tea Company at 
South Bend. 

B. R. Yasulis. What a young man of foreign birth can accomplish 
in America in a few short years is illustrated in the case of B. R. Yasulis 
of Indiana Harbor. Born in Russia in 1878, a son of Vincent and 
Rosalie Yasulis, his father a farmer and now deceased, B.'R. Yasulis 
spent his years until manhood in his native country and emigrated to 
the United States in 1900. In order to adapt himself to conditions and 
make the best of his opportunities he attended a business college in 
South Chicago, in which city he worked at his trade and established a 
barber shop, which was conducted six years. In 1906, on moving to 
Indiana Harbor, he expanded his enterprise, conducting a barber shop, 
a job printing shop, and also dealing in real estate. Finally his success 
justified him in specializing his business, and in 1913 the barber shop 
was sold, and in November, 1913, he completed a fine new brick building, 
two-story, with 25 foot frontage. His office is now a prosperous center 
for the sale and dealing in a great amount of foreign exchange, and he 
handles a considerable share of the local real estate business. His work 
as a job printer is also continued and is an important factor in his total 
income. 

Mr. Yasulis is a prominent man among his fellow countrymen as 
well as in the community at large and is a linguist. He has membership 
in the Lithuanian Alliance of America, belongs to the Lithuanian Pleas- 
ure Club, the Commercial Club, is a republican in polities and a member 
of the Catholic Church. 

Charles E. Fowler. About four months after the launching of the 
big development work which marked the beginning of Indiana Harbor, 
Charles E. Fowler left Chicago, where for ten years he had been in the 
real estate and insurance business, and opened his office in the same line 
at the new town. His place as a pioneer business man has been well 
secured by continued prosperity and enterprise, and he has not only 
watched but often taken a hand in the vast work of improvement going 
on about him. 

Charles E. Fowler was born in Ingham County, Michigan, October 
12, 1858, a son of Josiah and Mary (Barnes) Fowler. His father, now 
deceased, was for many years a minister of the Methodist Church. 
Charles E. Fowler spent the first twenty-one years of his life at Mason, 
Michigan, had the advantages of the public schools, and from early 
manhood to the present time has been more or less actively identified 
with real estate and insurance. For several years he pursued the study 
of law, was admitted to the Michigan bar, but has never practiced, 
though his knowledge of law has in many cases proved valuable to him 
in his business. In 1885 Mr. Fowler moved to St. Paul, Minnesota, and 
followed his regular line, and on July 1, 1891, located at Chicago. His 



706 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

experience in that city gave him familiarity with real estate and insur- 
ance on a large scale, and on October 13, 1901, he came to Indiana 
Harbor. Mr. Fowler has handled a great amount of property in the 
city and vicinity, and probably no other man has a more intimate knowl- 
edge of the change in values and of the many factors which have entered 
into the development of this section. 

On June 15, 1886, Mr. Fowler married Gertrude Pridham, of South 
Bend, Indiana. Their marriage was celebrated at Glasgow, Scotland, 
where Mrs. Fowler was at that time visiting a sister. Mr. and Mrs. 
Fowler have three children, Charles E., Jr., Lee B., associated with his 
father ; and Lucile, who married Ralph Briney and lives in Gary. Mr. 
Fowler has taken the Knight Templar degrees in Masonry, is a member 
of the Mystic Shrine, and is now master of Indiana Harbor Lodge No. 
686, A. F. & A. M. Other fraternal affiliations are with the Knights of 
Pythias and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the Royal 
League, while he belongs to the Commercial Club, the Baptist Church, 
and in politics is republican. 

Green Engineering Company. The Green Engineering Company 
was originally a Chicago industry, but after four years of operation in 
that city the plant was established at East Chicago in 1905. The factory 
grounds comprise twelve acres, and about three hundred and fifty men, 
mostly skilled workers, find employment and the means of their liveli- 
hood with that industry. It is one of the central institutions of pro- 
ductive industry which have given character to the Calumet region in 
general, and which are the mainstay of the resident population. 

The Green Engineering Company has a plant and its general opera- 
tions are those of a general foundry and machine works. The special 
line of manufacture which has given the company its widest reputation 
is mechanical stokers and pneumatic ash handling systems. The goods 
manufactured have a standing reputation among industrial managers 
and the company 's specialties are shipped all over the world. The plant 
is modern in equipment and has all the facilities for general foundry 
and machine works. 

The officials of the company are : P. A. Poppenhusen, president, a 
resident of Evanston. Illinois; II. A. Poppenhusen, secretary and general 
manager; and J. S. Dewey, superintendent of the works. Mr. Dewey 
has been with the company since 1900, and had supervision and active 
control of the erection of the plant at East Chicago. His home is in 
East Chicago, and his family consists of his wife and two children. Mr. 
Dewey is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, is a member of the Commer- 
cial Club and the East Chicago Club and the Safety First Association. 

Alwin Wild. Now one of the oldest merchants of Hobart, Alwin 
Wild has performed the kindly and efficient services of undertaker to 
the community for many years, is a prosperous furniture dealer, and 
his services are also recalled with appreciation for the work he did as 
township trustee and in connection with many other civic enterprises 
during the last quarter of a century. 

Alwin Wild was born at Shermerville, Illinois, in July, 1862. Edu-, 
cated in the country schools until sixteen years of age and reared on a 
farm, he spent his early career until twenty-two as a farmer, and then 
entered the employ of Peter Geisen in his furniture store at Crowu 




Ci&^^Ch^H^ 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 707 

Point. After two years, well equipped with experience, he engaged in 
the furniture and undertaking business for himself at Hobart. That 
was in 1886, and his name has been continuously associated with mer- 
cantile and civic affairs in that city ever since. His first location was 
in the building where the Hobart Bank now stands, and after two 
removals in 1893 he erected the building where Frank Reissig now has 
his place of business, and the building is still his property. In 1910 
Mr. Wild put up the new structure where his enterprise is still con- 
ducted, a two-story and basement building, 47x75 feet, a concrete and 
steel building, with all modern services and conveniences. The front of 
the upper floor is for apartments, while in the rear is a display room, 
the first floor being used for his stock of furniture, and the basement 
as a storage room and morgue. In the rear stands a two-story building, 
32x41 feet, used also for storage and for the shelter of his funeral equip- 
ment. The services of the Wild undertaking establishment extends in 
all directions about Hobart for fifteen miles. He keeps four hearses, 
an ambulance and an automobile, and in his furniture store carries a 
complete stock of household goods, besides paints and other lines. 

On January 18, 1888, Mr. Wild married Bertha Wischman of Hobart. 
Mr. Wild traveled with her through the South and East, but in spite 
of his devoted care she died July 27, 1911. She received her education 
in the Hobart schools. The five living children are : Mrs. Albert Wrob- 
bel, of Hobart ; Myrtle, sixteen years of age, and a student in the high 
school, who was the only Indiana girl who won the contest inaugurated 
recently by the Chicago American with a trip through Yellowstone 
Park as one of the prizes; Helen, aged fourteen ; Mildred, aged eleven; 
Almira, five years old. Mr. Wild has fraternal affiliations with the For- 
esters of America, the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. 

His civic relations have been of special importance. He is an active 
member of the Commercial Club, and was one of the charter members 
of the Hobart volunteer fire department, having been in the service 
for twenty-three years and for a time was assistant fire chief. In 1904 
Mr. Wild was elected township trustee of Hobart Township, serving until 
1908. He had the administration of the schools and the public roads, 
and is credited with starting the first stone road in his township. He 
was also instrumental in installing a modern heating and ventilating 
plant in the public school, and a water supply, favored and worked 
to get the manual training department organized, and did much to 
improve the athletic department of the school. His own pleasures are 
chiefly in the sports of motoring, fishing and hunting. Mr. Wild is a 
democrat. A few years ago he was a participant in the exciting pur- 
suit of the car-barn bandits through the sand dunes in the vicinity of 
Miller and Gary. Mr. Wild was in the depot where one of the bandits 
lay asleep, but was unaware of the outlaw's identity. He had his team 
and wagon there, later loaned it to the officers who carried the bandits 
to the station in his wagon. 

W. A. Miller. The Gary branch of Armour & Company was estab- 
lished in September, 1908, and opened for business on January 4, 1909, 
with W. A. Miller as manager. The office and warehouse now occupy 
a two-story and basement building, 75 by 125 feet, and all the facilities 
measure up to the high standards maintained everywhere by this great 
packing house. From the Gary plant the goods of Armour & Company 



708 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

are distributed at wholesale throughout the district for thirty or forty 
miles around Gary. Mr. Miller is one of the trusted and expert men 
who have been developed by the great house of Armour, and has had 
a long experience in the meat business, at one time as an independent 
retail dealer, and for a number of years with the present firm. At Gary 
the operations of the branch house were conducted at a loss for the first 
year or so, but Mr. Miller has since developed a business which classifies 
it at a high rank among similar houses throughout the country, and 
now has under him a staff of thirteen employees. 

W. A. Miller is a native of Indiana, born at Walkerton, May 7, 1875. 
and has an extensive acquaintance over this section of Indiana acquired 
since boyhood. His education was received in the public schools of 
Chicago, and he first learned the undertaking business. Later he was 
one of the employees of the Chicago Telephone Company, and was night 
manager of the company's South Chicago office eighteen months. This 
was followed by work as a stationary engineer with the Illinois Steel 
Company, and from that he went into the retail meat trade, selling 
meat over the block for four years. Armour & Company then secured 
his services as a salesman, and for four years before coming to Gary 
he was one of the handy men of the" Armour staff, and was sent to 
many different houses wherever needed as a relief manager. 

Mr. Miller was married June 15, 1898, to Winifred 'Donnell, 
daughter of Daniel 'Donnell. Daniel 'Donnell was for many years an 
employe of the Standard Oil Company, and was an oil worker in the 
early days of Western Pennsylvania, and a contemporary and associate 
of Rockefeller, and when the latter was still young and obscure, Daniel 
'Donnell once loaned him the sum of five hundred dollars. Mr. Miller 
and wife are the parents of five children : Edward, Cyrian, Margaret, 
Winifred and William Jr. Mr. Miller affiliates with the Masonic lodge 
and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and in politics is 
independent. 

Hubbard Steel Foundry Company. Established at East Chicago in 
1909, and beginning operations in January, 1910, the Hubbard Steel 
Foundry Company now occupies large grounds and is an industry worth 
noticing among the various manufacturing units in the Calumet region. 
Its plant is located with convenient access to the tracks of the Pennsyl- 
vania, Baltimore & Ohio and Indiana Harbor Belt Railway, and the 
grounds cover twenty-five acres. The output of the foundry is steel 
castings and chilled rolls for the rolling mills. The company also does 
a large amount of bridge and structural steel casting work, and special 
custom orders. The plant has a capacity of 1,600 tons per month, in- 
cluding 1,000 tons of steel work and 600 tons of chilled rolls. Its output 
is shipped all over the United States. 

The president of the company is Albert Pack, who also nils the office 
of treasurer, and W. L. Ronstrom is secretary. The Hubbard Steel 
Foundry Company is an Illinois corporation, with its head offices in the 
Railway Exchange Building in Chicago. 

Albert Pack was born at Alpena, Michigan, in 1889, a son of Albert 
and Cora (Maltz) Pack. His father was a lumberman, and moved from 
Michigan to Pittsburgh, where Mr. Pack received his education. At 
the age of fifteen he went into the steel mills and learned the business 
both in office and in the mills, and rose rapidly to responsible positions 
in the industry. He was at Canton, Ohio, with one of the large mills 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 709 

there for a time, and has been president of the East Chicago plant since 
1912. Mr. Pack has his home in Pittsburgh. 

0. C. Wicks, M. D. After half a dozen years of practice in his 
profession in Michigan, Doctor Wicks moved to Gary in 1908, and is now 
one of the leading physicians in the city, well known all over the com- 
munity and popular in all classes. He has a large private practice and 
is one of the prominent citizens of the Calumet region. 

Dr. 0. C. Wicks was born in Baltimore, Maryland, July 20, 1869, 
a son of Gardner A. and Sarah R. (Makinson) Wicks. His father was a 
cabinet maker by trade. Doctor Wicks began life with plenty of stimulus 
to accomplish all he could on his self-reliant efforts, since the family 
were not in a condition to supply him with funds for a leisurely educa- 
tion. From the public schools he became a student in the Polytechnic 
Institute at Baltimore, and having exhibited special proficiency in the 
mechanic art, did his first regular work as a teacher of drawing and 
manual training, and for ten years was employed in that vocation, 
namely, as a special supervisor. In the meantime he took up the study 
of medicine, and in 1902 was graduated M. D. from the department of 
medicine and surgery of the University of Michigan. His first six years 
as a physician and surgeon were spent in Muskegon, and from there he 
moved to Gary in 1908, and has since built up a large practice in 
general medicine. Doctor Wicks is a member of the Lake County and the 
Indiana State Medical societies and the American Medical Association. 

In August, 1891, occurred his marriage with Carrie M. Satterfield, of 
Easton, Maryland. They are the parents of one son, John S., now a 
student in the University of Indiana. Doctor Wicks affiliates with the 
Masonic order, is a progressive republican in his political sympathies, 
and belongs to the First Congregational Church at Gary. 

Harry Call. An active and successful attorney at Gary, Harry Call 
has had a varied and broad experience in his profession, and has been 
a member of the Gary bar since the first year of that city's existence. 
He is associated with Judge Greenlee in practice and his services have 
frequently been called in as an attorney for much important litigation 
in Lake County. 

Born in Grant County, Indiana, January 5, 1876, Harry Call is a 
son of John W. Call, the present postmaster of Gary, whose career is 
sketched elsewhere in this publication. It is a matter of note that John' 
W. Call constructed the first improved highway in Lake County, and 
his son was associated with his father in this work, and had charge of 
construction and the laying of the first gravel surface on a public road 
in Lake County. His education was acquired in the common and high 
schools, and after his experience with his father, he was employed in 
the steel plant for a year, and after that for seven years was in the mail 
service. While working for the Federal Government he pursued the 
study of law with Judge Greenlee, and was admitted to the Indiana bar 
in 1904, and to the Supreme Court in 1906. Since the latter year his 
home has been in Gary, and his practice has grown in proportion to the 
city 's rapid development. 

On June 23, 1903, he married Kathryn Gainer, of Greencastle, 
Indiana. Of their two children, one is deceased, and John Gainer Call 
is now about six years of age. Mr. Call affiliates with the Masonic 
lodge and the Knight Templar commandery, the Benevolent and Pro- 



710 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

tective Order of Elks, is a charter member of the Gary Commercial 
Club, also belongs to the Gary Y. M. C. A. and the Hammond Country 
Club. 

Don P. Van Liew. A young business man of Gary whose forte is 
real estate, and who has become known pretty generally throughout 
the city, is Don F. Van Liew, active manager of the large business 
conducted by the firm of Jeft'ery & Morgan. 

Don F. Van Liew was born at Lakeville, Indiana, August 17, 1879, 
a son of A. O. and Mary Van Liew. His father was a druggist at Lake- 
ville and the family had their home in Northern Indiana for many years. 
Don F. Van Liew, after getting a public school education, learned 
telegraphy and w r as employed as an operator by the Wabash Railroad 
for four years. From handling a telegraph key he turned his attention 
to a more active and independent line, and in 1905 entered the employ 
of Jeffery & Morgan at Chesterton, Indiana, and in a short time had 
so thoroughly gained the confidence of his superiors that when they 
opened a branch office in May, 1907, at Gary, Mr. Van Liew was elected 
to take charge of the business, and has successfully discharged those 
responsibilities ever since. The business is chiefly in the making of 
loans and realty, renting and insurance, and it has been built up to 
large proportions. 

Mr. Van Liew, in November, 1905, married Laura E. Ketring, of 
Chesterton, but who was born at North Webster, Indiana. They are the 
parents of two sons: Donald E. and John A. Mr. Van Liew affiliates 
with the Masonic order, has held all the chairs in the Knights of Pythias, 
and in politics maintains an independent attitude. 

C. C. Brink, M. D. Though one of the younger members of the 
medical fraternity of Lake County, Doctor Brink in ability and in the 
extent of his patronage ranks second to none of his competitors. Doctor 
Brink has brought to the active work of medicine and surgery an ex- 
ceptional equipment, gained both from the schools and from the resources 
of his own mind and adaptability for his chosen vocation. After an 
extended hospital experience in the East, Doctor Brink located at Hobart 
about two years ago. 

Born at Hammondsport, New York, July 1, 1883, Doctor Brink 
finished his course at his home high school, took his preparatory work 
in the Mercersburg Academy of Pennsylvania, entered Cornell Univer- 
sity, where he specialized in chemistry, and in June, 1910, was graduated 
M. D. from the Medico-Chirurgical College of Philadelphia. His clini- 
cal and hospital experience was unusually thorough. Eighteen months 
were spent after graduating in the Williamsport Hospital of Pennsyl- 
vania, in the Charity Lying-in-Hospital of Philadelphia and the Medico- 
Chirurgical Hospital of Philadelphia, and for eight months he was as- 
sistant to Dr. J. R. Carr, of Norristown, Pennsylvania. On coming to 
Hobart, Doctor Brink formed a partnership with Dr. E. R. Gordon, 
and at the death of Doctor Gordon on December 1, 1912, succeeded to 
the practice. 

Doctor Brink married Harriet E. Sadler, of Elmira, New York, on 
December 28, 1911. Mrs. Brink was born at Elmira August 28, 1886, 
and besides her education in the high school has developed her talents 
as a musician, both in piano and vocal. They have one son, John Cal- 
vin, now seventeen months of age. Doctor Brink has membership in the 





^^T^^^^-f ^5 ,XS2 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 711 

Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, is independent in polities, 
and a member of the Presbyterian church, of the Hobart Commercial 
Club, and his college fraternities were the Phi Gamma Delta at Cornell 
and the Phi Alpha Sigma in medical college. Doctor Brink is a member 
of the Lake County Medical Society, and the Indiana and American 
Association. He is now assistant coroner of Lake County and health 
officer for both East Gary and Hobart. 

The vigorous and wholesome out of doors has always been a factor 
in Doctor Brink's career, and while absorbed in his practice he takes 
his chief diversion in motoring, but also enjoys hunting and trap shoot- 
ing. In his early days he made a name in some of the minor leagues of 
baseball, was in the Wisconsin league of 1908, was pitcher for Oshkosh, 
and also with the Hudson River league and played with the Lake George 
team at Canandaigua, New York. 

H. W. Bennett. One of the recent additions to Gary's citizenship 
and business enterprise is H. W. Bennett, who in a short time has built 
up one of the finest undertaking parlors and service in Northern 
Indiana. Mr. Bennett has had a long and successful experience in his 
profession, and has as his associate his son Royal, a hustling young 
business man. 

H. W. Bennett was born in Medina County, Ohio, in 1869, a son of 
substantial farming people, Henry and Eunice Bennett. His training 
in the local public schools was followed by a course in the Northern 
Ohio Normal College at Ada, and for six years he was in the active 
work of teaching. That was followed by several years as a farmer on 
the old homestead, and in 1895 he engaged in the furniture and under- 
taking business at Wellington, Ohio. Subsequently he moved to Lima, 
was an undertaker there, and after a short experience in the same line 
at Elyria came to Gary on March 8, 1913, and opened his business. 

In 1890 Mr. Bennett married Ida Bauer of Medina County, Ohio. 
His three children are: Royal W., associated with his father; Edith 
L., at home ; and Mildred Y., also at home. Mr. Bennett affiliates with 
the Masonic Order, with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
is a progressive republican and a member of the Methodist Church. 

Royal W. Bennett, the son, learned the undertaking business in all 
its details, and has made a valuable partner to his father. He is also 
engaged in the hay and grain business at Gary. Their equipment for 
perfect service as undertakers includes everything modern. 

George Verplank. The rapid growth of automobile interests in the 
country during recent years has created an industry which has given 
a wide field of opportunity and enterprise to many young men of 
mechanical tastes and ability, and the establishment of Verplank Bros, 
at Gary is one of the oldest garages* and automobile sales agencies in 
the city. The brothers engaged in business January 18, 1909, the 
proprietors being George and Jerrett Verplank. Their garage was at 
117 W. 6th Street until the fall of 1911, and they then moved to 761 
Washington Street, where they occupy the ground floor and basement 
of a building 60 by 125 feet, and have all the facilities for first-class 
and reliable service. They handle the agency for the Moline and 
Studebaker cars and the White trucks, and have the only automobile 
funeral car in Lake County. 



712 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET EEGION 

George Verplank was born at Spring Lake, Michigan, May 18, 1886, 
a son of Joseph and Margaret (Brower) Verplank. His father, who is 
now retired after a long career as a farmer, was for four years sheriff 
of his county. Mr. Verplank learned the trade of machinist as a boy, 
and since his school days were over has more than made a living through 
the present prosperous establishment of Verplank Bros. 

On June 2, 1909, he married Adelaide Fetz of Marysville, Kansas. 
They have three children, Glen, Helen and Leone. Mr. Verplank 
affiliates with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and is independent 
in politics. 

William L. Farquharson. A resident of Gary since 1908, Mr. 
Farquharson served as assistant engineer and is now engineer in charge 
for the Gary Land Company. The part performed by this company in 
the initial work of improvement and development at Gary has been 
described on other pages, and the organization of the company and its 
personnel has also been made a matter of record. Mr. Farquharson is 
a skilled young Scotch engineer, who came to Gary about a year after 
leaving his native land, and in many ways has proved his ability and 
given excellent service to the corporation which employs him as chief 
engineer. 

William L. Farquharson was born in Scotland on April 27, 1887, a 
son of Donald and Margaret Farquharson of Glasgow. His father 
followed the business of valuator for a firm of chartered accountants. 
The son grew up in Glasgow, and from the common schools prepared 
for his profession in West of Scotland Technical College, which grad- 
uated him from the civil engineering department in 1907. In search 
of a field to apply his knowledge, Mr. Farquharson crossed the Atlantic 
and went to Winnipeg, Canada, but after about a year spent in Canada 
and other places came to Gary in June, 1908, and accepted the position 
of assistant engineer for the Gary Land Company. On January 5, 1914, 
he was promoted to the post of engineer in charge, and now has all the 
technical supervision of the varied works carried on by this company. 

Mr. Farquharson in 1911 married Margaret McGregor of New York 
City. She was born in Scotland and came to New York with her parents 
when a child. Their one son is William Henderson. Mr. Farquharson 
is financial secretary for Clan MacNeil No. 193 of the Order of Scottish 
Clans. His church is the Presbyterian, and his political support favors 
the republican principles. 

C. A. Huettner. That quality of enterprise which propels a small 
business into one of rapid prosperity and of ever-increasing strength 
as a factor in local commerce is well illustrated by the career of the 
People's Hardware Store of Gary, the oldest and largest establishment 
of its kind in that city, and without doubt the largest store for hardware 
in Lake County. The business dates its beginning in Gary April 20, 
1908, when C. A. Huettner opened the doors to the trade with a very 
modest stock of goods. Every month saw a substantial increase in the 
sales, the stock was enlarged to suit the demands, and in 1911 the busi- 
ness was incorporated with Mr. Huettner as president and manager, 
and F. Eibel as vice president and manager of the plumbing depart- 
ment. From twenty-five to forty people are now employed in selling 
the goods, handling the stock and looking after the various service per- 
formed by the company in its several departments. The store occupies 




/2#M4^yJ^~ 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 713 

a 25-foot frontage on Broadway and 50 feet front on Seventh Avenue, 
with 125-foot depth. The ground floor and basement are given up to 
the large and varied assortment of builders and general hardware, and 
there is also a large warehouse. 

The genius of this establishment from the beginning has been Mr. 
Hnettner, who. though a young man, had a long and practical expe- 
rience in this line of merchandising. Born at Joliet, Illinois, May 6, 
1884, a son of C. A. and Pauline Huettner, he attended the parochial 
schools while a boy, and early began work with the Barrett Hardware 
Company at Joliet. When he was nineteen years of age he had advanced 
so far into the confidence of his employers and had so well husbanded 
his earnings that he was able to buy an interest in a hardware store, 
but sold out his Joliet business in 1908 in order to establish himself 
as the pioneer hardware man of the rising City of Gary. 

Mr. Huettner was married October 17, 1911, to Cassilda Komp of 
Rock Island, Illinois. They are the parents of two sons, Carl A. and 
Donald Joseph. Mr. Huettner affiliates with the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks and the Commercial Club. 

Louis P. Kuss. One of the veteran business men of the Calumet 
region is Louis P. Kuss, now of Gary, and for many years one of Ham- 
mond "s business executives. Mr. Kuss now handles the insurance and 
rental department of the South Side Savings Bank, and as manager of 
this department probably produces more new business in the insurance 
line than any other individual in Gary. 

Louis P. Kuss was born in Laporte County, Indiana, in 1868, son 
of Christian and Matilda Kuss, his father one of the substantial Ger- 
man-American citizens and farmers of that county. Reared in the 
country, with a public school education, Mr. Kuss began his independent 
business career at Hammond in 1888, when twenty years of age. His 
home was in Hammond until 1908, and during the first five years of his 
residence he conducted a business of his own. During the subsequent 
fifteen years he had charge of the branch office at Hammond of the 
National Biscuit Company, and was general manager for all the territory 
of the Calumet district. On coming to Gary in 1908, Mr. Kuss became 
associated with Mr. CO. Holmes in the real estate and insurance busi- 
ness, and was one of the active factors in the organization of the South 
Side Trust & Savings Bank, and deserves the chief credit for having 
made the insurance department of this company the largest in the city. 
He represents twenty leading insurance companies, and for several years 
has collected in premiums about eighty-five thousand dollars annually. 
Mr. Kuss is also interested in several real estate concerns in Gary. 

On December 1, 1891, he married Sadie E. English, of Pennsylvania. 
They are the parents of three children : Bert, a law student in the 
State University, and lives in Gary ; Emma and Louis are both at home. 
Mr. Kuss affiliates with the Modern Woodmen of America, is a repub- 
lican, and his church home is the Methodist. 

Jake Kramer, Jr. Coming to the United States as a poor boy at the 
age of thirteeen, with no knowledge of the English language, with an 
indifferent education and without financial support, accepting whatever 
work he could find in order to get a start, and gradually working his 
way to a place for himself among the successful men of his community, 
such has been in brief the career of Jake Kramer, Jr., of Hobart. Mr. 

Vol. TI— 16 



714 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

Kramer is now owner of a handsome farm, of much property in Hobart, 
and his public spirit is an important factor in community affairs. 

Jake Kramer, Jr., was born in Flengen, Germany, July 5, 1867. 
His father, Jacob Kramer, who was one of the pioneers of Lake County, 
was born in Germany April 26, 1841, had his early education in his 
native country, and was married there July 5, 1866, to Maria Eigemann. 
Besides Jake, Jr., there are three sons and a daughter living, and the 
mother is still living and in excellent health. 

The Kramer family located at Hobart in 1880. Jake had to go to 
work to earn his own way at the age of thirteen, and consequently had 
little opportunity for schooling. His first employment was as a delivery 
boy for a grocery company at South Chicago, and after two years he 
went to the City of Chicago and was employed there four years. At 
the age of nineteen he went to North Judson, Indiana, and became man- 
ager of a large farm owned by a relative, and successfully handled its 
operations for two years. Returning to Chicago, Mr. Kramer then 
started a milk route, but after one year moved to Hobart in 1891. His 
first employer here was Charles Gruel, and after a year and a half 
he bought out his employer, and continued the business for two years. 
His next venture was the purchase of a farm in Porter County, but he 
rented the land and since then his career has been one of varied activities. 
With a team which he had purchased Mr. Kramer became one of the 
builders of the first gravel road in Lake County, a work which he regards 
with pride and satisfaction. In 1897 Mr. Kramer moved to the farm 
of his father-in-law, where he lived for six years, and in the meantime 
bought forty acres of his own. While conducting his farm he also 
engaged in the real estate business. Mr. Kramer bought property in 
Hobart, and erected a handsome residence which he still owns. Mrs. 
Kramer inherited considerable property from her father, including 
four store buildings on Main Street. Mr. Kramer for a number of years 
has shown exceptional public spirit in his community, and wherever 
possible has aided in the upbuilding of Hobart and vicinity. In 1914 
he laid out the Jake Kramer, Jr., Addition to Hobart. 

On March 4, 1893, he married Theresa Stocker of Hobart. They are 
the parents of four children: Helen, the oldest, is the wife of Everett 
Parks, a young lawyer of Hobart, and who has worked his way to success 
in his profession by his own efforts, having paid for his own schooling; 
Clara, George and Dwight. There is one grandchild, Jacob Parks. Jake 
Kramer, Jr., has attained to the Shrine in Masonry. He also belongs to 
the Hobart Commercial Club, and in politics is a democrat. 

Southside Trust and Savings Bank of Gary. Every item in the 
record of the Southside Trust and Savings Bank is an evidence of its 
soundness and perfection of service in every department. With a 
capital of $50,000 and a surplus and undivided profits of more than 
$10,000, this bank conducts a general banking business, acts as deposi- 
tary for public and postal savings deposits, has an abstract, department, 
and a department of property management, issues surety bonds, has a 
general insurance department, and as a trust company has all the 
powers to serve as administrator, guardian, trustee, receiver, etc. 

The officers of the bank are : C. O. Holmes, president ; William 
Feder, vice president; T. T. Snell, vice president; C. R. Kuss, secretary- 
treasurer ; L. P. Kuss, manager of the insurance and rental department ; 
and M. G. Kreinman, manager of the foreign exchange department. 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 715 

The Southside Trust and Savings Bank was organized in 1910, and its 
capital stock was increased from $25,000 in 1911 to $50,000. It occupies 
handsome quarters in a building of standard bank architecture, erected 
in 1911, and furnishing suites of offices upstairs. The building is located 
at 1112-1114 Broadway. 

C. R. Kuss, secretary-treasurer of this bank, has had a bi"oad and 
varied experience in banking, both in the Middle West and in the North- 
west. Born at Wanatah, Indiana, May 6, 1885, a son of Christian and 
Matilda Kuss, his father a farmer and business man, C. R. Kuss was 
educated in the public schools, and later provided himself with special 
training in his profession by a course in banking at the University of 
Chicago. In 1901, at the age of about seventeen, he was taken into the 
First National Bank of Hammond as a minor employee, and advanced 
to the place of receiving teller. Going to Chicago in 1905, he became 
connected with the American Trust & Savings Bank as receiving teller, 
and from 1907 to 1910 was assistant cashier in the Thomas Cruse Sav- 
ings Bank at Helena, Montana. On returning to Chicago in the latter 
year he took an active part in the organization of the Southside Trust 
& Savings Bank of Gary, and has since served as secretary-treasurer of 
the company. In 1914 he was elected president of the Lake County State 
Bank of North Chicago, Illinois. 

On October 10, 1911, Mr. Kuss married Hazel A. Arkwright of 
Helena, Montana. Mr. Kuss is a member of the American Institute of 
Banking at Chicago, belongs to the Gary Commercial Club, and his 
church is the First Methodist of Gary. 

William Pyatt. A business man of Hobart who has united fine 
success with a large public spirit is William Pyatt, whose home through 
practically all his life has been in Lake County, and whose practical 
accomplishment as a builder and contractor has so many illustrations 
in Hobart and in Gary as to require no further mention than this brief 
reference. Mr. Pyatt, while a successful business man, has not narrowed 
his interests into one groove, but is a man of an unusual intellectual 
range, and his collection of antiques and curios forms one of the most 
interesting and valuable in Northern Indiana. 

William Pyatt was born in Pennsylvania August 24, 1873, a son of 
Lafayette and Elizabeth Pyatt, his father now seventy-two and his mother 
seventy-four years of age. When he was an infant his parents moved 
to Lake County, and from the public schools he perfected himself in a 
mechanical trade, and was engaged in the wagon and carriage building 
business until 1905. In that year he established a shop as a building 
contractor, and has since developed a fine plant of his own, equipped 
with machinery and with all the facilities for producing the best kind 
of work in the finer grade of buildings. A great deal of his work has 
been done in Gary, though the examples of building constructions in 
Hobart and vicinity are very numerous. More than one hundred and 
twenty-five structures of different kinds bear the impress of the Pyatt 
name, and he has the distinction of having constructed the first bungalow 
at Hobart, and some of the finest buildings of that type in Gary. Besides 
a factory for the manufacture of much of his woodwork, he also handles 
builders' hardware. Mr. Pyatt affiliates with the Masonic Order, is a 
charter member of the Modern Woodmen of America, and has held offices 
in both lodges. In politics a republican, some years ago when William 
MeKinley was the candidate for president, he contributed substantially 



716 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

to the success of that statesman through his membership in a campaign 
quartette, headed by G. W. Scholler, and the quartette proved not only 
an effective campaign instrument, but gained a great reputation over a 
broad section of the country as singers. Mr. Pyatt has been an ardent 
sportsman, both fisherman and hunter, and in the early days was accus- 
tomed to kill ducks and quail by the hundred in this part of Indiana. 
His collection of relics comprises too many specimens for any individual 
mention. Among them are many tools and remains of Indian work- 
manship, and that part of his collection is said to be especially valuable. 
A part of what was called "the bridge of death" from the Iroquois 
Theater, destroyed by fire some eleven years ago, with a loss of about 
six hundred souls, also has a place in his collection. There is a flint- 
lock rifle handed down from the French and Indian war. A relic from 
the Lady Elgin, a Lake Michigan vessel that went down in 1869, is also 
found among a large number of other articles comprising a museum 
of great interest and source of valuable information and instruction. 

Andrew J. Smith. For nearly thirty years A. J. Smith has been 
one of the "forward-looking" and hard-working, practical-minded citi- 
zens of Hobart. Whether as a teacher, engaged in the work which gave 
Hobart its first graded school, or as editor or business man, it has always 
been his part to lead rather than to follow, and as editor and co-pub- 
lisher of the Gazette he has wielded an influence probably second to that 
of no other citizen of the town. There has never been a public improve- 
ment of any consequence inaugurated in this part of Lake County which 
has not first been advocated and insistently boosted by the Gazette. The 
Gazette proposed and kept at the proposition until it was realized, the 
building of gravel roads, and has also been in the van of such movements 
as those for the construction of sewer systems, waterworks, and other 
improvements which are at the basis of modern twentieth century 
municipalities. 

The Hobart Gazette is now one of the oldest newspapers with a 
continuous history in Lake County. For many years it was the only 
newspaper in the town, though several attempts were made to publish 
other papers, but all went down before the substantial competition of 
the Gazette. The Gazette was founded at Hobart in 1898 by George 
Narpass and A. Bender, but was soon in financial difficulties and was 
practically at the end of its usefulness when in the following December 
the plant was bought by Mr.' Smith under foreclosure, a number of citi- 
zens having persuaded him to take up the enterprise in order that the 
village might have proper representation in the newspaper field. P. S. 
Gristy was Mr. Smith's associate in the business for a few months, but 
sold out and in 1891 Mr. Smith took as a partner Nevin B. White, and 
the two have been proprietors and editors of the Gazette ever since. 
The Gazette has always been conducted on independent lines politically, 
Mr. Smith being a democrat and his partner a republican, and while 
thus regarding national politics from a bipartisan and impartial attitude, 
they have been unanimous on all questions of community and county 
concern, and have made their paper an exponent of everything that 
would help the substantial welfare of the city and tributary country. 

Andrew J. Smith was born at Mottville, in St. Joseph County, 
Michigan, March 20, 1861, a son of John A. and Emeline (Shellenberger) 
Smith. His father died in 1900, and there were two sons and three 
daughters in the family. In 1866 the family moved to a farm in Elk- 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 717 

hart County, Indiana, and his early youth up to eighteen was spent in 
the wholesome atmosphere of country life, with an education in the 
country schools. At Goshen during 1878-79 he prepared for teaching, 
and taught one term before he was eighteen. Farm work and other 
employment helped him to advance his education, and from 1879 until 
he graduated with the degree of B. S. in 1885 he was a student in the 
Valparaiso University as regularly as his means would permit. The 
lirst year after completing his college education was spent in Grant 
Park, Illinois, as a teacher, and in 1886 he came to Hobart, in August, 
and was placed in charge of the Hobart schools. The schools were then 
ungraded, and there were four teachers. He went to work to introduce 
many improvements, grading the schools, and inaugurated a two-year 
course in the high school. The lirst class graduated in 1899 consisted 
of only one graduate, Miss Carrie Banks, now deceased. Another year 
was added to the school curriculum, and the four years Mr. Smith spent 
at Hobart as an educator were the most fruitful of results and did more 
towards laying a good foundation for the future than any similar period 
either before or since. He has always continued a keen interest in edu- 
cational matters, and now has the satisfaction of seeing twenty-three 
teachers in the public schools of the town, with an enrollment of about 
five hundred scholars. Besides instituting the graded system, he also 
introduced the first school library. 

On July 7, 1884, Mr. Smith married Miss Elva L. Stiwald of Ohio, 
who died February 2, 1904. On December 30, 1905, he married Mrs. 
Ara Adella (Spray) Stroupe. Mr. Smith is active in Masonry, having 
served as secretary of the lodge for eight years and worshipful master 
for seven years, his home lodge being McClelland Lodge No. 357, A. F. 
& A. M. He is also affiliated with Valparaiso Chapter No. 79, R. A. M. ; 
Valparaiso Council, R. & S. M.; Gary Commandery No. 57, K. T. ; is 
high priest of the Orak Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Hammond; has 
recently retired from a service of seven years as patron of the Eastern 
Star Chapter at Hobart, and during the years 1914-15 was grand patron 
for the state. Other fraternal affiliations are with the Knights of Pythias 
and the Knights of the Maccabees. He is a charter member of the 
Hobart Commercial Club, and has always been a loyal democrat in his 
political affiliations so far as national affairs are concerned. He is an 
enthusiastic fisherman and hunter, and has been an official of the Hobart 
Gun Club. Religiously he was reared in the faith of the Dutch Re- 
formed Church. Besides his important position as an editor, Mr. Smith 
is also one of Hobart 's bankers, being president of the American Trust 
& Savings Bank. He is secretary of the Gary, Hobart & Eastern Traction 
Company, which, in 1913-14, constructed a line from Hobart to Gary. 

A. M. Blank. The commercial history of the little Town of Miller 
could not be written without reference to the name Blank, as the father 
of the present merchant was the founder of a store there forty years 
ago, and the people of that vicinity have bought goods from. Blanks 
through all those years, and have known them as reliable business men, 
and the prosperity of earlier years has been marked by increasing 
volume during the twentieth century, since the remarkable development 
of the lake shore region at Gary and eastward has been under way. 

A. M. Blank was born at Miller, January 28, 1886. He was educated 
in the common schools, was one year in the Hobart High School, a year 
in the commercial department of the Valparaiso University. Finishing 



718 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

his studies in 1902, shortly thereafter he became manager of the mes- 
senger department for the Western Electric Company. Returning to 
Miller in 1906, Mr. Blank bought the store of his brother, which was 
then located one block from the present large and well-equipped store 
building. The business was founded by Mr. Blank's father, Charles F. 
Blank, about forty years ago, and it has always been regarded as one 
of the cornerstones of Miller's importance as a trading center. In 1910 
Mr. Blank built the present store structure, a two-story brick building, 
costing about eight thousand dollars. It has a full-sized basement used 
for the storage of goods. Above the store is an eight-room flat. The 
store is equipped with all modern fixtures, is heated by furnace and 
lighted by electricity, and a perfection refrigerator has been built in on 
dimensions 8 by 10 feet with a capacity for ice of five tons. Mr. Blank 
carries a full line of meats and groceries, also dry goods, boots, shoes 
and notions, and has a trade not only in the Village of Miller, but as far 
as Gary and his custom comes from all over the township. There are 
six employees, with two wagons, and in its present prosperous condition 
the business is a monument to the enterprise of Mr. Blank. 

On February 1, 1905, he married Cora E. Gillett, who was born in 
Chicago and educated in that city. Her birth occurred September 28, 
1884. She has also had special musical training. She is a member of 
the Episcopal Church in Gary. There are two children : Mildred L., 
aged eight; and Gillett A., aged five years. The oldest child is now 
attending school at Miller. Mr. Blank owns a good car and takes great 
pleasure in motoring about the country, and has always been willing 
to put his shoulder to the wheel in connection with any cooperative 
enterprise for the development of this section. He foresees in the near 
future a great growth which will comprehend Miller and all the vicinity, 
since its unrivaled railway facilities make this entire region one which 
cannot be overlooked by capital. Mr. Blank is one of the parties who 
control a franchise for the construction of a street car line from Miller 
north to the lake shore, and as the lake front at the north is already a 
resort of growing popularity, the construction of such a road will do 
a great deal for Miller. 

J. O. Nelson. One of the oldest residents of the Town of Miller is 
J. O. Nelson, whose earliest recollections cover this locality as it was 
more than forty years ago, and whose individual enterprise has con- 
tributed to things as they are, and who is one of the honored public 
officials of the town. 

J. O. Nelson was born in Sweden, June 29, 1863, and came with his 
parents to the United States in 1869. They settled at once at Miller, 
and were among the pioneers of that portion of Lake County. J. 0. 
Nelson acquired his education in the Miller schools, and has been a 
hard worker and has made all the prosperity which he now enjoys, in- 
cluding a good home, and the satisfaction of having provided well for 
his growing family. For the past three terms he has served as town 
marshal of Miller.. 

On December 31, 1892, Mr. Nelson married Annie W. Nelson, who 
was born in Sweden. They are the parents of six children : Geneva 
Maria ; Florence ; Helen, attending the Gary High School ; Edward and 
Emily, aged, respectively, twelve and six, and in the Miller schools; 
Robert, aged four. Mr. Nelson owns a comfortable dwelling in Miller 
and has always been able to provide liberally for his family. He is a 




^J&^ a Tf^^rf 






LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 719 

republican in politics, is a Scottish Rite Mason, and his church is the 
Lutheran. 

John A. North. When John A. North settled at Miller in 1873, it 
was a location hardly deserving the name of a village, since it contained 
only three houses. Forty years of residence have made him one of the 
pioneers, and in proportion to the length of his abode he has enjoyed 
the esteem of a community which recognizes him as one of the most active 
factors in business affairs and in the improvements and introduction of 
modern means of living. 

John A. North is a native of Sweden, born November 15, 1849, and 
coming to the United States at the age of twenty-one in 1870. The 
schools of his native country had given him his early training, and he 
arrived in this country with no knowledge of the English language, and 
with only his industry and ambition to depend upon to advance him to 
fortune. Locating at Miller in 1873, he was a foreman in the construc- 
tion of the Baltimore & Ohio Railway through this section of Lake 
County. Later he engaged in the contracting business for himself, and 
for twenty years was superintendent of the Lake Shore Sand Company. 
The honor of the office of postmaster was given him, and after he had 
administered the office commendably for three years, he was succeeded 
by his daughter, Emma L., who was the capable head of the local office 
for twelve years. The first postmistress, Emma L. North, was succeeded 
by Marie Elizabeth. Mr. North also owns a farm of eighty acres in 
Southern Minnesota, land which he acquired some twenty-seven years 
ago, and rented out. 

His public service has been especially noteworthy. He was elected a 
member of the town board three times, and during that time some of 
the most important improvements were inaugurated and many of them 
completed. That of the greatest importance was the construction of a 
drainage ditch costing $19,000. Improvement of the highways in the 
town was also an important item of progress. The schoolhouse costing 
$16,000 and town hall costing $4,000, besides the installation of an electric 
lighting plant at a cost of $12,000, were all undertaken and completed 
during his administration. Mr. North deserves a great deal of credit 
for having led the way in the construction of durable sidewalks in the 
town. He put down an excellent walk in front of his own home, and his 
example was followed by others. His residence is one of the best in town, 
a nine-room dwelling with all modern improvements. Mr. North has 
sold a good deal of real estate in Miller, and is one of the active and 
aggressive business men. 

In May, 1874, he was married, and Mrs. North was born in Louisville, 
Kentucky, and educated in the schools of that city. They are the parents 
of seven daughters and one son — Gertrude, born in January, 1876 ; 
Thomas, born December 25, 1878; Marie Elizabeth, born September, 
1882; Emma, born August, 1884; Ellen, deceased; Agnes, born April, 
1886; Clara, born May, 1890; Ethel, born January, 1894; and Grace, 
born November, 1896. Gertrude is now the wife of Emil Nelson, living 
at Porter, Indiana, and the mother of seven children ; Thomas is married 
and living in Chicago ; Marie Elizabeth is the wife of Dwight Carpenter 
and has two children; Emma married W. D. Carroll of Newcastle, 
Pennsylvania, and has one child; Agnes is the wife of Al Johnson of 
Hobart and the mother of one child. Mr. North is a republican in 



720 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

politics, was for a number of years a deacon of the Lutheran church, 
and is known and esteemed throughout the country around Miller. 

William Kostbade. The people of Hobart feel that the local post- 
office was never under better management than at the present time, with 
William Kostbade as postmaster. Mr. Kostbade has been long identified 
with Hobart town and vicinity, has witnessed the village grow into one 
of the best resident towns of Indiana, and as a farmer and business 
man has enjoyed success and has been liberal of his means and influence 
in promoting the public good. 

William Kostbade was born in Germany in 1866, and when four years 
of age came with his parents to the United States. They lived one year 
in the State of Delaware, and moved to Chicago, just after the great 
fire. That city remained his home until he was seventeen, and in the 
meantime he attended the public schools, being in the old Clark School 
for two years and then in the Pickett School until finishing in 1879. 
Mr. Kostbade 's father died at the age of seventy-six and his mother at 
the age of sixty-five. The son learned the moulder's trade in Chicago, 
and came with his parents to Lake County on March 1, 1883. During 
most of the time until his marriage in 1889 he was employed at his 
trade in Chicago, and subsequently spent one year in the grocery busi- 
ness in that city. On returning to Hobart he was engaged in farming 
for two years. His wife owned sixty-five acres, and he increased that 
tract to 105 acres. After two years in personal supervision of his 
farm, he moved into Hobart and established an express and draying 
business, which at the end of three years was sold and he spent one 
summer on the police force at Robey. That was during the time when 
the Robey races were at their height, and were closed down by Governor 
Mathews. Mr. Kostbade afterwards bought some land at Waverly, 
Tennessee, moved from there to Johnsonville in the same state, and 
sold his first land to his brother. After one year in Tennessee and after 
selling out, Mr. Kostbade returned to Hobart in 1896 and was closely 
identified with the management of his farm until 1913. 

In that year Mr. Kostbade received appointment as postmaster of 
Hobart, and was one of the first, if not the first, postmasters appointed 
by President Wilson. He has brought the affairs of his office into excel- 
lent order and is doing all in his power to improve the service. 

At Hobart in 1889 Mr. Kostbade married Emma Passow. She was 
educated in the common schools of Hobart, and since her marriage has 
devoted her time to her family. They are the parents of eight living 
children, five sons and three daughters. The oldest son, Louis, is twenty- 
two years of age, has finished school and is now engaged in farming. 
The second son is Clarence ; William, Jr., took special training in busi- 
ness, and three, Raymond, Rose and Edward, are in school. The 
daughter, Mable, is assistant in the postoffice, and Helen, the yoiuigest 
daughter, is still at home. 

Mr. Kostbade has membership in the Commercial Club and the 
Lutheran Church, and is a democrat in politics. He allied himself with 
the cause of the democratic party during the administration of Hayes, 
at which time he became convinced that the tariff had no important 
relation to the wage problem. Mr. Kostbade has always been a great 
student of history and public affairs, and is regarded as one of the best 
informed men in his community. It is his opinion that in the course 
of years all the various towns through the Calumet region will become 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 721 

consolidated as one large city, and he believes that the future of Hobart 
is especially bright, He knew Hobart when it was a town of only a 
few houses, and few men have done so much to improve local conditions. 

William C. Jahnke. With all the years of his adult life spent in 
the Calumet district, William C. Jahnke has been a witness of history 
in the making in this district, has with credit and honor borne his own 
share of citizenship duties, and is one of the highly esteemed and pros- 
perous business men of Hobart. 

William C. Jahnke was born at Tolleston, now a portion of the City 
of Gary, in May, 1865. There was a time in his own experience when 
he could have bought lots in South Gary at $5 apiece, and the pre- 
vailing price for this property at this time is $1,500 a lot. Mr. Jahnke 
has a brother and two sisters living, besides four half-sisters. His 
brother is Lewis, of Boston, Massachusetts; and one sister lives in East 
Gary, and the other at Tolleston. 

After an education in the schools of Lake County, concluding at the 
age of thirteen, William C. Jahnke worked as a farm boy, paid his 
tuition for a more thorough schooling, and lived on a farm until he was 
twenty-one. At that age he began service for the Michigan Central 
Railroad at Lake Station, spent one year there, one year at Wheeler, 
and was with the Grand Trunk at Ainsworth for a time. For twelve 
years he was engaged in the retail coal and wood business, and in 1897 
entered the service of the Standard Oil Company, and is the Hobart 
representative of that industry at the present time. 

On December 27, 1886, Mr. Jahnke married Reca Dewel of Ross 
Township. They are the parents of one son and two daughters. Charles, 
the oldest, was married September 9, 1912, to Mabel Eich, of Chicago, 
who died June 9, 1913. Lillian, who was born February 14, 1890, 
married Herbert Milling, of Oak Park, and they have a son, born No- 
vember 6. 1913. The youngest child, Mildred, born January 27, 1905, 
is now in the fourth grade of the Hobart schools. Mr. Jahnke has 
affiliations with the Independent Order of Foresters and the Knights of 
Pythias. He is a member of the Hobart Commercial Club, and has been 
quite active in civic affairs for a number of years. He is captain of the 
hook and ladder company and for twenty years a member of the vol- 
unteer fire department. For four years he has served as treasurer for 
the city board, and is now a trustee from the First Ward. During his 
time of official service in the town the sewer and lighting system were 
constructed, and he was treasurer of the sewer fund. In politics he is 
republican. Mr. Jahnke owns a comfortable two-story and basement 
brick house, in which he resides, and is substantially situated in this 
community. 

Dr. Clara Faulkner is one of the successful women physicians of 
Northern Indiana, and has brought to her profession the best qualifica- 
tions of technical preparation and the strength and fidelity of true wom- 
anhood. She has for a number of years been successfully identified 
with practice at Hobart. 

Dr. Clara Faulkner was born in Laporte County, Indiana, March 25, 
1863. Her early education was acquired chiefly in the common schools 
of Iowa, having moved with her parents to Floyd County, near Charles 
City, and living there until the age of sixteen. After two years spent 
in Minnesota, she came to Hobart and soon afterwards entered school 



722 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

at Valparaiso, taking the teachers' course. Doctor Faulkner was a 
successful teacher in the old Edwards School at Hobart, beginning in 
1882, and continuing for three years. Three years were spent in Fort 
Wayne, and her home was in Chicago until 1901. She took up the study 
of medicine in 1896 and in 1901 was graduated M. D. from the Bennett 
Medical College of Chicago. In September of the same year she returned 
to Hobart, and has since enjoyed an excellent practice. 

At an early age Doctor Faulkner married Charles Lambert, and in 
1886 became the wife of her present husband. Mr. Faulkner is engaged 
in business in Chicago, but makes his home in Hobart and returns from 
the city each day. Doctor Faulkner has one living child, Mrs. Hubert 
Bullock, and has two grandchildren. She is an active member of the 
Order of the Eastern Star, the Royal Neighbors, the Knights of the Mac- 
cabees and the Pythian Sisters, having held office in all these orders. 
Doctor Faulkner believes in the right of suffrage for women. 

Paul C. Newman. Hardly anyone in Hobart is unfamiliar with the 
exceptional business enterprise of Paul C. Newman, who is both a pros- 
perous merchant and public-spirited and useful citizen. He is at the 
head of a large hardware, heating and plumbing and garage establish- 
ment, his business having been founded in 1900. It was started like 
most enterprises which have the possibilities of growth, on a small scale, 
in a room 20 by 40 feet on Main Street. His first stock was entirely 
hardware, and it was as a result of conservative but vigorous enterprise 
that he expanded his concern, at the end of five years taking a double 
store. During the following five years the business continued to prosper, 
and he then built two storerooms, one 22 by 100 and one 22 by 88 feet, 
and subsequently added a warehouse 20 by 24 feet. At the present time 
Mr. Newman has plans drawn for the construction of a fireproof build- 
ing, one story in height, but so arranged that a second story can be 
added. It will be a handsome addition to the commercial district of 
Hobart, and will be used exclusively as a garage and automobile supply 
and salesrooms. Mr. Newman is agent for the Harley-Davison motor- 
cycle, and also sells automobile trucks. In his older line of business 
he has facilities for the handling of all kinds of roofing, heating and 
plumbing contracts, and supplies the goods and installs the apparatus 
for such work both in Hobart and the surrounding towns, including 
Etna, Miller, East Gary, and other places. It has been as a result of 
planning his affairs a long way ahead that Mr. Newman has enjoyed 
more than average success. 

Paul C. Newman was born in Chicago, September 6, 1873, and has 
lived in Hobart most of his career since he was five years of age. His 
father was born in Berlin, Germany, came to America when a young 
man, had traveled all over the world, and by pony made the trip from 
Denver to the Pacific Coast. He bought mines and had a property which 
promised a fortune, but owing to the operations of an English syndicate 
in buying all the available water rights, he had to sacrifice his holdings 
for much less than they were worth. The father subsequently built the 
South Chicago Rolling Mills, and it was his wish to buy real estate about 
Gary and Lake County, but desisted owing to the objection of his wife. 
The father predicted the growth of this section and was one of the ster- 
ling and well-remembered business men of Hobart and vicinity. Paul 
Newman grew up in Hobart, attended the public schools to the tenth 
grade, when he left his studies to begin an apprenticeship under his 



1 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 723 

father, who was a building contractor. After his father 's death he went 
to Hammond, was employed there by Charles Levine one year, returned 
to Hobart to work under James Carpenter and Steward Lightner, and 
at the age of nineteen started out as a journeyman and was employed 
in the plumbing and heating trade in most of the cities of the United 
States. He was twenty-six years of age when he returned to Hobart and 
set up in business for himself. 

On November 6, 1894, Mr. Newman married Margaret Stresser of 
Hobart. Their one son, Everett, who is now completing his course in 
school, plans to take over the management of the garage. Mr. Newman 
is affiliated with the Masonic order, the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, the Independent Order of Foresters, has passed through most of 
the chairs in the Odd Fellows lodge, and is one of the aggressive mem- 
bers of the Commercial Club at Hobart. Mr. Newman gave all his influ- 
ence and energy to the promotion of the Hobart lighting system, and 
when the modern sewerage system was installed most of the hardware 
was supplied through his store. The municipal improvements which 
have done so much to make Hobart a modern city in recent years have 
all had the active support of Mr. Newman. Outside of business and 
civic affairs his interests go to outdoor life, fishing, hunting and motor- 
ing, and he now plans the organization of a local gun club. 

William Scharbach, Jr. One of Hobart 's enterprising and pro- 
gressive business men, William Scharbach, Jr., has lived in that locality 
for the past twenty-two years, and during that time the Scharbach name 
through both father and sons has become well known in connection with 
the lumber trade and manufacturing. While giving close attention to 
business affairs, Mr. Scharbach is known for his progressive civic enter- 
prise, and is one of the men who deserve special credit for the various 
municipal improvements which have placed Hobart in the van among 
Lake County towns. 

William Scharbach, Jr., was born in Chicago, March 28, 1879. He 
attended school in the German Lutheran schools of Chicago until coming 
to Hobart with his parents in 1893. He was confirmed by Rev. E. R. 
Schuelke in 1893. After the Scharbach enterprise and family were 
established in Hobart, the junior Scharbach began work for his father 
in the lumber yard and mill. 

On August 25, 1901, William Scharbach, Jr., married Caroline 
Ewigleben of Hobart. They have one child, Myrtle, now eleven years 
of age and attending the German Lutheran parochial school at Hobart. 
Mrs. Scharbach, who is devoted to her home and family, was educated in 
the public schools and in the German Lutheran schools. 

It is due to the united efforts of William Scharbach, Sr., and his sons 
that the large lumber and general building material plant has been 
developed under the Scharbach name. The business is one now employ- 
ing nine or more men, and the trade extends all about Hobart for eight 
or ten miles in every direction. On moving to Hobart, William Schar- 
bach. Sr., bought out W. H. Riffinburg, who was then conducting a small 
yard with one small shed. The yard is now equipped with two large 
sheds, and much open space, besides a three-story fireproof planing mill 
and a large warehouse. The factory is equipped with modern machinery 
and the Scharbachs are able to supply almost everything desired in the 
way of building material, builders' hardware and supplies. Besides 
William Scharbach, Jr., four other brothers are connected with the busi- 



724 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

ness, while one brother is at Mishawaka, Indiana, with the Frank Lumber 
and Coal Company. 

Mr. Scharbach 's mother is still living at the age of sixty-eight. Both 
his father and mother were born in Germany, "William Scharbach, Sr., 
in 1843, coming to the United States when twenty-two years of age. 

Mr. Scharbach is a member of the Hobart Commercial Club, and 
belongs to the local carpenters' union. Some special mention should be 
made of his civic enterprise. As an officer of the local fire department, 
he has been instrumental in organizing and bringing the department 
up to a high standard of efficiency. On November 14, 1911, Mr. Schar- 
bach was elected to the town board, taking his seat January 1, 1912. 
During his administration he put himself in the lead on the fight for 
the sewer system, and his efforts deserve much credit for the splendid 
sewerage system that Hobart now has. He also deserves honorable men- 
tion in connection with the introduction of the present boulevard system 
of lighting in Hobart. The town board voted unanimously in favor of 
both improvements, and Mr. Scharbach took time from private business 
in order to study and investigate the best system both for the sewer 
system and the lighting. In politics he is a republican and is a member 
of the German Lutheran church. An enthusiastic baseball fan, he at 
one time played the game as member of a regular team. 

John P. Stawicki, M. D. Gary has no more loyal and useful citizen 
than Dr. John P. Stawicki, who has a high standing in his profession, and 
while especially esteemed among the Polish people of Gary, has identified 
himself practically with the community at large, and is known as an able 
representative of his profession and in the general field of business. 
Doctor Stawicki is proprietor of the Broadway Pharmacy and owns the 
two-story brick building, 25 by 72 feet, in which this drug store is con- 
ducted. The location of his store is at 1428 Broadway. 

A native of Poland, Dr. John P. Stawicki, who was born in 1880, when 
seven months of age came with his parents to the United States. His 
early home was in Illinois and his schooling was acquired at St. Ignatius 
College in Chicago. Doctor Stawicki took his medical course at the Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons, the medical department of the University 
of Illinois, entering that school in 1904 and graduating M. D. in 1908. 
Following his formal school course he was an interne at St. Bernard's 
Hospital in Chicago and at St. Margaret's Hospital in Hammond, 
Indiana. His first regular practice was done in Indiana Harbor, and 
from that community he moved to Gary in April, 1913. Doctor Stawicki, 
though a general practitioner, has had a growing practice as a specialist 
in surgery and obstetrics. 

Doctor Stawicki married Florentine Ostrowski of Hammond. She 
was a teacher in the public schools of Chicago for three years. They are 
the parents of two children, Jeanette, now four years of age, and John, 
an infant. Doctor Stawicki is a member in high standing of both the 
Chicago Medical Society and the Lake County Medical Society, and is 
medical examiner for several fraternal orders, including the Knights of 
Columbus, the Independent Order of Foresters, the Polish and Slavish 
National Alliance, and the Polish Roman Catholic Union. 

George E. Tabbert. Youth is no bar to business success. Twenty- 
two years of age, Mr. George E. Tabbert is already at the head of the 





i^^^c^z^ v^,>y> 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 725 

prosperous Tabbert's Grocery at Hobart, is vice president of the Com- 
mercial Club, and one of the leading men of the town. 

George E. Tabbert was born at Hobart, February 23, 1892, was grad- 
uated in 1910 from the Hobart High School, and during his school days 
had secured the experience which he has utilized in the building up of 
a prosperous store. While a schoolboy he was employed by the firm 
of Scheidt & Keilman in order to pay his way. He was prominent in 
athletic and social affairs in the high school, and in 1909 took part in 
fhe oratorical contest as a representative of the Hobart school. 

Mr. Tabbert is a son of Mrs. Emma Tabbert, whose business enter- 
prise originated the establishment now known as Tabbert's Grocery. 
Mrs. Tabbert was born in Hobart August 17, 1864, and besides George 
has one son and three daughters, all of whom are at school except the 
youngest. Mrs. Tabert's father was Lewis Wettengel, who was one of 
the first settlers of Lake County and located in Hobart when it had only 
three houses. This pioneer was a native of Germany, and arrived in 
the United States when about twenty-one years of age. Mrs. Tabbert, 
in order to support her family, had established a small candy and cigar 
store at Hobart, and after finishing his schooling George E. Tabbert took 
hold of this place with characteristic energy, and he and his mother 
have since developed one of the best stores in the town. A line of 
groceries was added, larger quarters were secured, and the stock has 
been increased until the original room was extended by an addition 20 
by 24 feet, besides a basement. A complete line of fancy and staple 
groceries and meats are carried, and the trade is among many of the 
best people of the town. The store is equipped with the latest fixtures, 
and progressive methods prevail in every department. 

Mr. Tabbert is a progressive in politics. He was elected vice presi- 
dent of the Hobart Commercial Club on March 4, 1914, and since the 
beginning of his career has aligned himself with civic enterprise in the 
town. He is a member of the volunteer fire department, and on Febru- 
ary 11, 1914, while on duty, was injured so seriously as to be confined 
to his bed for three weeks. Mr. Tabbert is also town clerk of Hobart, 
a member of the board of directors of the Commercial Club, and was 
chairman of the committee which managed their last banquet. He is 
also president of the Hobart Athletic Club, and continues his interest 
in athletics, in which he was prominent while in the Hobart school. 

C. F. Heck. It is not an empty distinction to have lived actively and 
usefully in any community for more than half a century. One of the 
most interesting old-timers of Lake County is C. F. Heck, now living 
retired, in the society of his children and with the work of home and 
garden to occupy him at Hobart. Many of the events chronicled in these 
pages are matters of personal recollection with Mr. Heck. The scroll 
of progress was unrolled before his eyes, and he himself was no incon- 
spicuous actor in the affairs which have constituted the progress and 
development of this section of Indiana. 

C. F. Heck was born in Germany, a country which furnished many 
sterling pioneers to Northwestern Indiana. His birth occurred Febru- 
ary 1, 1849. When eleven years of age, after some schooling, he accom- 
panied his parents to the United States, and his father, who died Jan- 
uary 10, 1903, at the age of eighty-seven, bought a farm of forty acres 
near Hobart. C. F. Heck was the only child, and remained on his father's 
farm until 1884. He then bought a place of 200 acres, and for many 



726 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

years was one of the leading farmers, with a special reputation for the 
raising of draft horses. 

On April 1-4, 1884, Mr. Heek married Johanna Struebig of Lake 
County. She was born September 15, 1857, and died August 23, 1898. 
There were three children: Lydia, who was born October 18, 1885; Ida, 
who was born June 2, 1887, and is now Mrs. W. 0. Carlson ; and Martha, 
born January 8, 1891, and married S. B. Rupp, March 4, 1914. There 
is also a grandson, in whom Mr. Heck takes particular delight, Robert F. 
Carlson, who was born February 2, 1913. 

Mr. Heck has membership in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and the Independent Order 
of Foresters. For eight years he gave substantial service as a citizen on 
the township advisory board. During that time the Hobart school ad- 
ditions and the Miller High School addition were constructed, with an 
expenditure aggregating fifty thousand dollars. He is a republican in 
politics and a member of the Methodist church. Mr. Heck retired from 
active affairs about eleven years ago, and has since enjoyed the fruits 
of a well-spent career. His youngest daughter was educated in the 
normal course at Valparaiso, and by a business course in Chicago. 

When Mr. Heck came to Lake County Hobart was marked by only 
one store, and in the early days he has seen Crown Point people come 
into the village by stage coach. There was no church in the community, 
practically every improvement has been placed here since he became 
an active participant in affairs. Among his acquaintances was the ven- 
erable Wellington Clark, who was known as Lake County's oldest citi- 
zen and who died at the age of ninety-seven. In the early days Mr. 
Heck made a number of trips to Chicago by team and wagon, walking 
alongside the wagon. He recalls one trip which he made with his uncle. 
Both walked the entire distance into Chicago, and when they got along 
about Eighteenth Street and Wabash Avenue, his uncle remarked that it 
was a pity he had not bought land there some years previously, and 
yet at that very time it was possible to make investments in real estate 
at $100 an acre of land that is now almost in the heart of the city. 

Ove A. Johnson. In years of life and professional activity, one of 
the younger members of the Lake County bar, Ove A. Johnson, has all 
the advantages of youth, energy and enthusiasm, and those qualities he 
has employed to advance him into a place of leadership as a member of 
the Hobart bar. 

Born at Latimer, Iowa, February 22, 1885, Ove A. Johnson is of 
Danish parentage, and on his mother's side comes of distinguished 
lineage. Both his father and mother were natives of Denmark, his 
father born in 1847 and the mother in 1843, and are still living at Lati- 
mer, Iowa. They came unmarried to the United States in 1868, and 
in the following year joined their lives in wedlock. Besides the Hobart 
lawyer there are two daughters and four sons. The ancestry on the 
mother's side goes back to the year 1608, and Mr. Johnson of Hobart 
has complete records of this branch of the family covering all the subse- 
quent years. One of his ancestors gained particular prominence in 
Denmark, his name was Ove Jorgensen Hoegh Gruldberg. who, after 
graduating with honors in 1749, was ordained to the ministry, in 1754 
was made professor of oratory at Sara Academy and continued a mem- 
ber of the faculty from 1761 to 1764, then was private tutor to Prince 
Frederick until 1771, was appointed a councillor of state and cabinet 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 727 

secretary under Prince Frederick, and in 1774 became private secretary 
to the king, and was made king 's private councillor and minister of state. 
In 1780 he was raised to the rank of nobility, and died at Wiborg, Den- 
mark, in 1808. 

The early education of Ove A. Johnson was acquired in the country 
schools, but most of his advantages have been secured as a result of his 
own efforts, and he has a remarkable range of experience for a young 
man. After he was thirteen he spent two years in the high school at 
Latimer, then remained on the farm until seventeen, and this was fol- 
lowed by a year in the commercial department at Valparaiso University. 
As a young man he conceived the idea that travel and practical expe- 
rience in meeting men and conditions was one of the best equipments and 
training for a successful career. It was therefore entirely as a matter 
of education and experience that he started on a round of travel through- 
out the western states and territories, through North and South Dakota, 
parts of Canada, Montana, and elsewhere in the Northwest. He spent 
a year altogether in this hard school of practical experience, six months 
one time and six months at another. Some of his experiences were in 
Southern Idaho along the Snake River. He started out without funds, 
and depended upon such work as he could get between stations to pay 
his way. While on his journey through North Dakota he had a starva- 
tion experience near Williston. It was in the early fall when he arrived, 
and it was necessary that he stop and get some work in order to stake 
him to the next town. He found 300 men sitting around looking for 
work, and his own cash capital was reduced to five cents. Falling in with 
some friends who had a little more money, he spent several days in a 
hand-to-mouth existence, and they had to resort to almost desperate 
expedients in order to keep from starving. One of the party picked 
some berries, boiled them, and after eating was taken sick and died. 
Mr. Johnson was spared the humiliation of resorting to begging when a 
thresherman came along and employed him and a companion at wages 
which came above the verge of starvation. 

After this educative experience, Mr. Johnson returned to**Valparaiso 
and entered the university in the scientific department, remaining tliree 
years to complete his high school training. Later he graduated in 1909 
from the law department, and in the fall of that year again went out 
West and entered the University of South Dakota, where he made a 
special study of real estate, abstract and public speaking, and did a large 
amount of research work. Returning to Indiana, in June, 1911, Mr. John- 
son opened his office and has since enjoyed a growing and prosperous 
general practice. He is a member of the Danish Brotherhood and the 
Patriots, is independent in politics, and among the churches favors the 
Unitarian creed. 

Mr. Johnson is naturally interested in outdoor life and in many 
activities aside from his private business. Both at Valparaiso and in 
the University of South Dakota he played football and baseball, and 
it is easy to arouse his enthusiasm over the sports of hunting and fishing 
and camping. 

In civic matters his influence at Hobart is well understood by the 
people of that community. He helped to organize the Commercial Club, 
and secured many of the signatures to the original membership. He has 
great faith in organized movements as a method of getting important 
things done in a community, and he has proceeded his individual share 
in the work of upbuilding the Hobart community on the principles that 



728 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

this is one of the coming' large towns of Northern Indiana. His faith 
is strong in the municipal ownership idea, and he was one of the pro- 
gressive men of Hobart who advocated and finally secured the construc- 
tion of the sewerage and lighting plans through municipal enterprise. 

H. E. Keilman. The kind of public spirit which constantly plans 
for the community welfare and is prodigal of personal time, energy and 
means in getting the plans carried out, has been the chief characteristic 
of H. E. Keilman 's citizenship at Hobart. Mr. Keilman is one of the 
most successful of local business men, but the successful management 
of his enterprises has always been accompanied by a constant readiness 
to leave his own interest and work heart and soul for something he 
thought Hobart or the vicinity ought to have. 

Mr. Keilman was born at Dyer, in Lake County, August 25, 1874. 
His father was for many years a merchant in Chicago, and his store 
still stands on Lincoln Avenue in that city. *Mr. Keilman acquired his 
early education at Dyer in the country schools until he was seventeen 
years of age. His own business experience has been in merchandising 
since his youth, and the people of Hobart credit him as one of the most 
successful men in the upbuilding of a large and prosperous business. 
For two years he was employed by a relative in a general merchandise 
store at Dyer, then transferred to George F. Gerlach for one year, and 
through the influence of Mr. Gerlach found a place with the wholesale 
department of Carson, Pirie, Scott & Company in Chicago, and the four 
years he spent there was a valuable training for his subsequent work. 
In 1898 Mr. Keilman came to Hobart, and with Edward Scheidt as 
partner embarked in a small enterprise as junior partner. The first 
store was in a space 22 by 45 feet, and the stock was limited to a small 
line of dry goods. In a short time they moved across the street to Main 
and Third, taking a storeroom 35 by 80 feet, and extending their stock 
to general merchandise. As an evidence of their enterprise it should 
be noted that their store was one of the first in Hobart to be equipped 
with a plate-glass front. Their trade extended rapidly, and it soon became 
necessary to acquire the adjoining store room, 24 by 80 feet, an arch- 
way being cut through to connect the two stores. As trade kept expand- 
ing, they subsequently got a third addition, again cutting through and 
adding a space 22 by 75 feet. The Keilman Store is now one of the most 
complete in general lines of merchandise in this part of the state. Many 
of their regular customers live in Porter County, and their trade extends 
for a radius of ten to twelve miles about Hobart. 

While the building up of such an enterprise has been sufficient to tax 
the energies of an ordinary man, Mr. Keilman has for a number of 
years devoted himself unreservedly to the public welfare. In 1905 he 
was elected trustee, taking his seat on the board in January of the 
following year, and by reelection in 1909 has served two terms of four 
years each. His progressive ideas in public matters have been realized 
in many directions. He undertook an exhaustive study of lighting sys- 
tems and sewers, and as chairman of the board, after a hard fight, was 
instrumental in getting the present excellent system of boulevard light 
and a complete sewer system for Hobart. Much time was spent in 
investigating and studying the problems presented, and Hobart 's im- 
provements in these lines are a practical monument to his administra- 
tion. As president of the town board, of which he has been a member 
for eight years, Mr. Keilman secured an appropriation of $25,000 to 




<tiM/Ji*u*MC. 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 729 

build the present bridge over Deep River. He is a member of the Com- 
mercial Club, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Knights 
of Columbus, and in politics is a democrat. His diversions take several 
directions; he is particularly fond of hunting and all outdoor sports, 
and is the oldest member of the Hobart Hunting Club. 

In 1899 Mr. Keilman married Margaret Froehler of Chicago. They 
are the parents of eight children, five sons and three daughters, five of 
whom are attending school. 

Walter G. Black. Though not yet thirty years of age, Walter G. 
Black has made for himself a reputation and a secure place in his 
profession as a civil engineer. His work has been especially commend- 
able at Hobart and East Gary, where he had charge of the most impor- 
tant municipal improvements of recent years. It is ability to do his 
work well that has brought Mr. Black into prominence, and he is the 
architect of his own fortune. 

A native of Valparaiso, in Porter County, Walter G. Black was 
born April 26, 1885, a son of Henry F. and Asenath Black. The father 
was born in Lake County in 1859, but most of his career was spent in 
Porter County, where he is now living retired, and at one time was 
county treasurer. The mother was born at Valparaiso in 1858. Besides 
the engineer at Hobart there are four other sons and a daughter. An 
older son, Carl, has for a number of years been engaged in the news- 
paper business and is now at Valparaiso. The daughter, Louise, is the 
wife of Walter Coin of Valparaiso. The younger sons live at home 
with their parents. 

Walter G. Black received his education in the common schools until 
he was thirteen, then spent three years in high school, and by economical 
use of his resources and by hard work got a university training at Val- 
paraiso, being graduated with the degree C. E. in 1912. Following his 
graduation he established an office as civil engineer at Hobart, and has 
since been employed in the office of city engineer for both Hobart and 
East Gary. 

On April 4, 1912, Mr. Black married Isabel Rowe. She was educated 
in Hobart in the high schools, and is active in social circles as a member 
of the Women's Reading Club and the Eastern Star. They have one 
child, John Henry Black, born September 18, 1913. Mr. Black is 
affiliated with the Masons and the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks. A life member of the Commercial Club, this honor was bestowed 
upon him in recognition of his services as the construction engineer for 
the installation of the boulevard system of lighting at Hobart. He also 
had the supervision of the construction of the sanitary sewer system for 
about eight miles, and water main extension and many other public 
improvements. He is engineer for the Gary, Hobart and Eastern Rail- 
road Company, a road which is planned as an important addition to 
the transportation facilities of Hobart, and which will do a great deal 
toward extending the prosperity of that city. Mr. Black is a member 
of the Delta Epsilon fraternity at the University of Valparaiso. 

Judge William M. Dunn. Now serving as city judge of Gary, Mr. 
Dunn has had a successful and varied career as a lawyer and citizen. He 
is one of the older members, of the bar at Gary, having practiced in the 
city since 1907, and his services have been employed in a large amount 
of the litigations arising from both civil and criminal sources, and he has 

Vol II— 17 



730 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

represented some of the more important interests, including a railway 
attorneyship. 

William M. Dunn is a native of New Haven, Connecticut, where he 
was born June 14, 1878, a son of Matthew H. and Kate (Eustice) Dunn. 
His father is an old railway man, having been in the service in many 
different parts of the country for a number of years. After getting a 
high school education, Mr. Dunn was for a time also in the railway 
service, later was a student and graduated from the university at Chat- 
tanooga, Tennessee, and in 1907 took his law degree at the Yale Law 
School. His advent in Gary occurred on Thanksgiving day, November 
25, 1907, and being satisfied with the possibilities of the growing city, 
and after a few successful skirmishes at the beginning of his profession 
has practiced here with growing patronage and prestige ever since. He 
is now at the head of the firm of Dunn & Lucas. 

On November 26, 1913, Mr. Dunn married Deloma M. Clifford, of 
Valparaiso, Indiana. For five years Mr. Dunn represented the Wabash 
Railroad as local attorney, and for one year was attorney for the Penn- 
sylvania Railway Company. In 1913 he was elected to the office of city 
judge at Gary and has administered the city court since January 5, 1914. 
Fraternally his affiliations are with the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, the Knights of Columbus, the Loyal Order of Moose, and the 
Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen. During his early manhood, in 1898, 
when the war broke out with Spain, he enlisted and served in the Third 
Connecticut Regiment of Volunteers, being mustered out with the rank 
of lieutenant. His church is the Roman Catholic, and he is one of the 
trustees of Holy Angels Catholic Church of Gary, Indiana. 

Austin L. Thompson. One of the oldest and most prominent fami- 
lies of Lake County is represented by A. L. Thompson of Hobart. Mr. 
Thompson himself has lived in this county nearly sixty years, and this 
was his environment while growing to manhood. He went from Lake 
County to the war, and during the greater part of his active career has 
been closely identified with the farming and stock-raising interests. As 
a stockman, particularly in the raising of blooded horses, Mr. Thompson 
is easily one of the most successful in this part of the state. 

A. L. Thompson was born in New York State, August 21, 1842. When 
he was two years of age his parents moved to Wisconsin, and when he 
was twelve they established a home in Lake County, among the early 
settlers. The country schools supplied him with his mental training, 
while on his father's farm, mind and body were well disciplined, and 
he lived under the parental roof until he was past twenty-one. At the 
age of twenty-three Mr. Thompson enlisted in the One Hundred and 
Sixty-first Indiana Infantry, and went with the regiment into Tennessee 
and saw some active service before the close of the war. Returning to 
Lake County at the end of his term of enlistment, Mr. Thompson began 
life as a farmer, and by industry and intelligent management acquired 
a substantial position both as a business man and citizen. In 1893 Mr. 
Thompson began to turn his chief efforts and management to the stock 
business. Since then he has made a reputation as owner and raiser of 
many fine horses, and has specialized in the Percheron stock. 

On August 31, 1863, Mr. Thompson married Elizabeth Barney of 
Lake County. Her death occurred January 14, 1914. Theirs was an 
ideal companionship, prolonged more than half a century, and many 
people of Lake County will recall the happy occasion when they cele- 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 731 

brated their golden wedding anniversary. Their five children, three sons 
and two daughters, are all living, the girls living in Lake County, and 
the sons in Porter County, and all substantial farming people. There 
are also twenty-six grandchildren and one great-granddaughter. At the 
golden wedding anniversary, besides the five children, with their husbands 
and wives, there were twenty-five grandchildren and the great-grand- 
child present, and the photograph of that notable family group is one 
of Mr. Thompson's most cherished possessions. For twenty years Mrs. 
Thompson was an invalid, and while attending to business Mr. Thompson 
was devoted to her care and was almost constantly with her. Neverthe- 
less, he has found time to take much interest in town affairs, and has 
manifested his public spirit at every possible occasion. Pie is an esteemed 
member of the Grand Army Post, and in politics a democrat. It is a 
matter of interest to note that when Mr. Thompson located at Hobart 
the village had only three houses. 

On the 19th of October, 1914, Mr. Thompson married Mrs. Irene 
Pattee, a native of Sandusky, Erie County, Ohio, who was born Julv 
17, 1844. 

John Mathews. Now more than fourscore years old, John Mathews 
is still regarded as one of Hobart 's most influential citizens. His career 
has exceptional interest. He responded to the first call for soldiers to 
put down the rebellion. Twice he voted for Lincoln. In his memory are 
stored words heard from the lips of such national leaders as Douglas and 
Dan Voorhees, and he followed such generals as Sherman and Thomas 
in the war. Of a pioneer family in Northwestern Indiana, he is now 
one of the "grand old men" of Lake County. 

John Mathews was born in Ross County, Ohio, in 1833, and at an 
early age his parents moved to Fulton County in the same state, and 
after four years there to Porter County, Indiana, establishing a home 
near Hebron in 1840. Thus the early years of his boyhood John 
Mathews spent in Northwest Indiana, and on April 14, 1861, almost as 
soon as the news of the fall of Fort Sumter was received and the first 
call issued for troops, he joined Company H of the Ninth Indiana 
Volunteer Infantry. That was in the three months service, and was 
followed by his enlistment for three years. He went out as a member 
of Company E in the Thirty-eighth Indiana Infantry, and his service 
continued until the close of the Rebellion. He followed the flag in the 
many bloody campaigns through Kentucky, Tennessee and Georgia, 
participated at Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, the campaign leading 
up to the fall of Atlanta, and then returned with the forces of Thomas 
which at the battle of Franklin routed and completed the ruin of the 
Southern army under Hood. During the early weeks of his career as a 
soldier while in West Virginia Mr. Mathews was wounded on July 8, 
1861. 

Following the war, in 1865, Mr. Mathews established his home in 
Hobart, and has been a resident of that little city of Lake County for 
nearly half a century. In 1858 he had married Louisa Hardesty of 
Porter County. Her death occurred in 1859, and in March, 1860, he 
married Mary Crisman of Porter County. Mr. Mathews has one son 
living in Pullman, Illinois, born December 22, 1860, and for many years 
identified with the Pennsylvania Railway Company. This son has two 
daughters, both unmarried. 



732 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

Mr. Mathews is the oldest Mason in the lodge at Hobart, having 
taken his master's degrees in August, 1866. He served three terms as 
worshipful master of his lodge. He also belongs to Lodge No. 333, 
I. 0. 0. F., in which he was honored for eight terms as noble grand and 
as secretary for seven years. Mr. Mathews is one of the esteemed mem- 
bers of the Hobart Commercial Club, and has always taken much part 
in local civic affairs. He is a member of the Unitarian Church, and in 
politics is a republican. In his early youth he heard Stephen A. Douglas 
in one of his speeches, and later knew personally such men as Colfax, 
Voorhees and other noted Indiana citizens. His first presidential vote 
was cast for John C. Fremont for president in 1856, and he voted for 
Lincoln in 1860 and in 1864, casting his ballot at Valparaiso. Mr. 
Mathews was in Washington at the time of the grand review of the 
Union army following the surrender of Lee. In his younger days he 
was a musician, and one of the leaders in musical circles at Hobart. 
When Mr. Mathews settled at Hobart it was a village with only a few 
houses, and he has witnessed practically the entire growth and develop- 
ment of that thriving community. For twenty-eight years he has dis- 
pensed local justice through the office of justice of the peace, but expects 
to retire during the year 1914. Though not a lawyer, he has frequently 
been consulted on matters of law by members of the bar, and his opinion 
is one esteemed among all who know him. Among the many measures 
of local improvements with which he has been influentially identified 
should be mentioned the campaign for placing the light and waterworks 
plant of Hobart under municipal ownership. Mr. Mathews also recalls 
as one of many reminiscences of the past that he has hunted ducks and 
rabbits over the country now covered by the prosperous industrial com- 
munity of Gary. 

Blaz A. Lucas. A member of the bar at Gary, where he has practiced 
since 1911, Blaz A. Lucas is a well trained young lawyer, and has already 
proved his ability in a number of well contested cases in the local courts. 

Blaz A. Lucas was born in Croatia, Austria, January 26, 1883, a 
son of Mathew and Theresa Lucas. His father emigrated to the United 
States in the same year that the son was born, and the family followed 
after him in 1885. Their home was in Calumet, Michigan, in the midst 
of the mining region of the northern peninsula, and Mathew Lucas 
worked as a miner in that vicinity for some years, and later conducted 
a general merchandise store. The son grew up in Calumet, acquired 
a public school education, and at the beginning of his career for a 
livelihood was employed in a store and also in the Calumet State Bank. 
His ambition was for a profession, and largely through his own efforts 
he paid his way through the law department of Valparaiso University, 
where he was graduated in 1911. In the same year he came to Gary 
and joined Judge William M. Dunn, one of the older lawyers in point 
of practice at Gary, and the firm of Dunn & Lucas has since enjoyed a 
large share of the local business. 

Mr. Lucas on May 4, 1908, married Blanche Plummer, of Bay City, 
Michigan. They have an adopted child, Bernard. Mr. Lucas affiliates 
with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the Croatian 
Sons. His church is the Catholic and in politics he is a democrat. 

Indiana Harbor National Bank. The oldest bank of Indiana 
Harbor and the only one under national charter is the Indiana Harbor 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 733 

National Bank, whose splendid resources are indicated by its capital 
of $100,000, a surplus of more than $25,000, and approximately three- 
quarters of a million dollars in deposits. 

The Indiana Harbor National Bank was organized under its present 
charter on April 6, 1912, and succeeded the Indiana Harbor State Bank, 
which had been organized under a state charter January 16, 1905, 
with a capital stock of $50,000. That bank in turn was the successor 
of the old Lake County State Bank, an East Chicago organization of 
1903, which was extended to serve the community of Indiana Harbor. 
The organizers of the Indiana Harbor State Bank were : W. R. Holligan, 
T. F. Donovan, James D. Erskin, Otto J. Gonclolf, the first cashier, and 
Albert DeW. Erskin, president. Early in December, 1906, the holders 
of a large portion of the stock sold their interests to G. J. Bader, Fred 
J. Smith and others, and the board of directors then elected were as 
follows: G. J. Bader, president; J. H. Youche, vice-president, and F. H. 
Ericson, cashier. In February, 1909, J. G. Allen was elected cashier 
and has since held that post. 

On the incorporation under a national charter in 1912 the following 
officers and directors were chosen: G. J. Bader, president; Fred J. 
Smith, vice-president ; J. G. Allen, cashier ; George M. Witt, assistant 
cashier; W. R. Holligan and T. F. Donovan. The number of directors 
were increased from five to seven in January, 1913, causing the addition 
of J. H. Youche and C. A. Westberg. During the summer of 1914 Mr. 
Westberg resigned and Mr. Witt was elected to the vacancy. The bank 
owns its own site and building, the banking house having been erected 
in 1907-08 and occupied since May, 1908. The building covers ground 
48 by 130 feet and a portion of the first floor is occupied by the United 
States postoffice and the upper part is for offices. 

Alexander G. Schlieker, M. D. When Doctor Schlieker recently, 
in January, 1914, retired from the office of mayor of East Chicago, he 
left a record for practical accomplishment and efficient administration 
such as no other mayor in the history of that city had ever equaled. 
Doctor Schlieker, besides his splendid civic service, is related to East 
Chicago in several interesting capacities. He was one of the first drug- 
gists to engage in business in that city nearly twenty-five years ago. 
For a number of years he has been an active physician and surgeon, 
with growing emphasis on his surgical practice, and there are many ways 
in which he might well be considered East Chicago's foremost citizen. 

Born at Chilton," Wisconsin, April 24, 1868, Alexander G. Schlieker 
is a son of Henry and Eliza (Oberkircher) Schlieker, his father a sub- 
stantial farmer. Doctor Schlieker, after getting his education in the 
public schools, learned the drug business, and not long after the estab- 
lishment of East Chicago, choosing this locality for his business career, 
on February 4, 1890, started one of the very first drug stores and thus 
has a position among the pioneer settlers of East Chicago. After a 
number of years in the drug trade. Doctor Schlieker aspired to an 
independent profession, and finished his course in medicine at the 
Northwestern University in Chicago in 1900. Since then he has devoted 
himself assiduously to his practice, and in surgery is regarded as the 
most expert in his line in the city. Doctor Schlieker is a member of the 
Lake County and Indiana State Medical societies and the American 
Medical Association, and in 1907 was honored with the office of president 
of the county society. 



734 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

In 1895 Doctor Schlieker married Florence Cresswell of Chicago. 
Their two children are Grant and Florence. The doctor has affiliations 
with the Masonic Order, including the Knights Templar, the Scottish 
Rite and the Mystic Shrine ; also with the Knights of Pythias and the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the East Chicago Com- 
mercial Club. In politics he is a republican, and besides his recent 
office at an earlier date he was health officer and township physician 
several years. 

Elected mayor of East Chicago in 1909, Doctor Schlieker served 
from the beginning of 1910 until January 5, 1914. Of his competence 
and the general popularity of his administration as mayor it is not 
necessary to speak, since the community will long have grateful remem- 
brance of his work. Some statistical facts may serve to indicate what 
Doctor Schlieker did as mayor. On the basis of official records it is 
easy to prove that he built more streets and sidewalks than were con- 
structed during any previous administration. Within that four years 
the fire department was given complete new apparatus, including new 
hook and ladder trucks, electric fire alarm system on all the streets, and 
another noteworthy improvement was the setting up of appropriate 
street signs at all street intersections. At the present time East Chicago 
has 8.6 miles of pavement, laid at a total cost of $239,875.68 ; 13.1 miles 
of macadam roads, which cost $90,000.00; 3.4 miles of brick pavement, 
which cost $179,544.12 ; 2 miles of brick pavement now under construc- 
tion, which will cost $200,000.00; 12.7 miles of asphalt pavement, which 
cost $557,191.44; 58.3 miles of 6-foot sidewalk, costing $242,777.52; 
7.1 miles of brick sewer, costing $517,931.56 ; 27.3 miles of pipe sewer, 
installed at a cost of $358,719.78 ; 27 miles of house connections, which 
cost $70,000.00. Since East Chicago became a city a great amount of 
permanent improvement has been done, but during the four years of 
Doctor Schlieker 's administration more than forty per cent of the above 
enumerated municipal improvements were built. 

Thomas J. Stearns. One of the old settlers of Lake County, a man 
whose enterprise and capital have been employed to build up and improve 
several localities, Thomas J. Stearns is particularly identified with the 
commercial center of East Gary, where he now has his home. The inci- 
dents of his career have been sufficiently eventful so that their narration 
would make a long story, and the following sketch will reveal only an 
outline suggestion of a long and useful life. 

Thomas J. Stearns was born in Porter County, Indiana, six miles west 
of Valparaiso, February 28, 1842. His education was that furnished by 
the country schools near Wheeler until he was eighteen. The following 
year was spent with his father on a farm in Lake County, a mile west of 
Hobart, and at that time there was only one school in the township. 
When the war broke out between the North and the South he had only 
recently passed his nineteenth birthday. In 1861 Mr. Stearns was one 
of the ardent youths of Indiana who responded to the early calls for 
soldiers to put down the rebellion, and went into the Fourth Indiana 
Battery under Capt. A. K. Bush and Mark DeMot as first lieutenant, 
and was with the Army of the Cumberland, participating in several of 
the hardest fought battles of the Avar. He was in the great battle of 
Shiloh in April, 1862, fought at Perryville, later at Stone River, was in 
the operations about Chattanooga, and at Lookout Mountain was taken 
prisoner and for six weeks was held a captive in the notorious Libby 




JbMa Jd'^ 




3^^ 



43>>l-fiL</ 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 735 

Prison at Richmond, and then taken to Belle Isle in James River and 
completed six months as a prisoner. He was released on parole April 
4, 1864, just half a century ago. Sent to Annapolis and Columhus, Ohio, 
he spent the last weeks of his term of service on garrison duty in Chatta- 
nooga, and after completing the three years of his service returned to 
Hobart in 1864. 

A veteran soldier, he readily exchanged the implements of war for 
the implements of fruitful industry, and for the first three years lived 
on a farm near Hobart. On coming to the village he engaged in the 
hotel business, later opened a stock of groceries, sold out and bought a 
farm and conducted it until 1871, when he moved into Porter County 
and bought some timber land. A year and a half later saw him back 
on the farm near Hobart, and in 1878 he moved to Lake Station, buying 
twenty-one acres of land and opening a general mercantile store, which 
was conducted under his name and management until 1882. The follow- 
ing year was spent in Michigan City as a guard at the penitentiary, and 
he then opened a hotel and managed it for a year and a half at Lake 
Station. That was followed by a meat market for two years, and finally 
he traded the twenty-one acres at Lake Station for his present property. 
Mr. Stearns has prospered as a result of his judgment and strict attention 
to business, and now owns two lots in Miller, though at one time he had 
about two hundred lots in that place, and sold them as a subdivision. At 
East Gary he owns a comfortable two-story residence and fourteen acres 
of land. 

In December, 1864, Mr. Stearns married Elizabeth Caruthers of Lake 
County. At her death in 1869 she left two children, both now deceased. 
On February 28, 1871, Mr. Stearns married Ella Stilwell, of Scoharie 
County, New York. Her father, Smith T. Stilwell, was born in New 
York July 26, 1808, and died in his native state. Joseph Stearns, the 
father of Thomas J. Stearns, was born in Rhode Island and settled in 
Montgomery County, Indiana, in an early day, and died at the age of 
seventy-eight at Hobart. He fought in the battle of Tippecanoe, at the 
beginning of the War of 1812. Mrs. Stearns is an active member of 
the Rebekahs, but is devoted to her home life. Mr. Stearns has been 
through all the chairs in the Odd Fellows lodge, and is called the father 
of Hobart Lodge and is one of the oldest Odd Fellows! in the county. 

A republican in politics, he has had a very useful career in connec- 
tion with public affairs. He was elected assessor and held the office 
eighteen years, served three terms as justice of the peace, and for some 
time was the only justice in his township. He also was a trustee for 
the Town of East Gary, and is now president of the school board, which 
is constructing a fine schoolhouse to cost about $20,000. In the cam- 
paign which was necessary to secure such an appropriation and the 
official indorsement of the school building, Mr. Stearns had a very 
active part, and this important improvement in educational facilities is 
in no small degree a monument to his efforts. Mr. Stearns' name appears 
on the town hall as one of the trustees at the time of its construction. 
In looking back over his past Mr. Stearns has many interesting recol- 
lections. Fifty-six years ago he slept on ground where the Froebel 
School now stands in Gary, and killed a deer in that vicinity and brought 
it back through an Indian camp then on the site of Gary. The day 
he was twenty-one years of age he was with the troops which occupied 
Hoover Gap, and all day lay in trenches, and says that every time he 
tried to move or raise his head he became a target for the watchful 
rebel sharpshooters. 



736 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

First Calumet Trust and Savings Bank. The growth and develop- 
ment of any community depend largely upon its financial interests, 
and no one institution is so closely connected with the very vitality 
and welfare of a town or city as its banks. The First Calumet Trust and 
Savings Bank, since its establishment five years ago, has not only shown 
a somewhat remarkable record of prosperity and stability, but has been 
one of the cornerstones upon which the commercial prosperity of the 
community has rested. 

The organization of this bank occurred early in 1909, the charter 
having been secured in April of that year, and the doors were opened 
for business on May 9th. With a capital stock of $50,000 a few other 
figures will suffice to show the growth and strength of the bank. At the 
statement issued October 31, 1914, the total resources aggregated 
$385,840.32 ; at that elate the total deposits, both savings and individual, 
aggregated $308,316.70. When the bank opened for business in May, 
1909, the deposits were $3,831.50, and in successive years were, $69,326.36, 
$115,043.03, $281,537.35, $367,079.85 and $350,741.64. The earned 
surplus of the bank is now $25,000.00, and there has been a steady growth 
in this feature of the statement. The First Calumet Trust and Savings 
Bank is a designated depository of the State of Indiana, and besides its 
general banking and savings department, it operates a real estate 
department, deals in insurance, foreign exchange and an agency for 
ocean steamship tickets, safety deposit vaults, and is equipped for every 
ordinary commercial service expected of a bank or trust company. 

The first officers of the institution were : John B. Peterson, president ; 
Samuel W. Ogden, vice-president; Walter J. Riley, vice-president and 
acting president; and Frank T. Maloney, cashier. At the resignation 
of Mr. Maloney on May 1, 1910, Mr. J. Kalman Reppa was elected 
cashier and acted in that capacity until March 17, 1914, when he was 
succeeded by C. H. Wells, who is the present cashier. Some of the best 
known business men in the Calumet region are represented in the list 
of directors. Among them Mr. Peterson, the president, is well known 
in public affairs and is a resident of Crown Point; Samuel W. Ogden 
is manager of the Grasselli Chemical Company at East Chicago ; Walter 
J. Riley is president of the First State Trust and Savings Bank, Indiana 
Harbor, Indiana; Lawrence Becker is judge of the Superior Court at 
Hammond, and there are several other well known business men on the 
board. 

Edmund C. Scheidt. A pioneer family of Lake County, one that 
shared in all the labors and hardships of the early period of develop- 
ment, Edmund C. Scheidt has himself for many years been closely 
identified with the business of Hobart. The "Bee Hive" store is well 
known, not only in the city but over the country for miles around, and 
it is only necessary to allude to Mr. Scheldt's relation with it to indicate 
his exceptional success as a prosperous merchant. 

Edmund C. Scheidt was born at Dyer, Indiana. June 11. 1870. His 
parents were both natives of France, his father born in 1831 and his 
mother in 1833, and his father was one of the pioneers of Lake County. 
At one time he was offered land in the central section of Chicago at a 
dollar and a quarter an acre, and he afterwards said that he did not desire 
to buy a marsh, but wanted good land that would grow things. The 
early education of Edmund C. Scheidt was acquired in the schools at 
Dyer, and also in the St. Joseph School at Teutopolis, Illinois. He is 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 737 

liberally educated, having taken the collegiate course and graduating in 
1890. On returning to Dyer, Mr. Scheidt engaged in the milling busi- 
ness with his father, and remained there until 1893. His next location 
was at Elnora, Indiana, where his enterprise was directed to general 
merchandising for two years, and then, moving to Hobart, he engaged 
in business with Mr. Stommel under the firm name of Stommel & 
Scheidt. After three years Mr. Scheidt opened a store for himself 
across the street, and at the close of the first year took in as a partner 
his nephew, H. E. Keilman. That was the beginning of the splendid 
establishment now known as the' Bee Hive, which occupies a large 
frontage on Main Street, and is one of the best patronized and most 
prosperous centers for all kinds of goods in Lake County. 

On October 17, 1892, Mr. Scheidt married Mary Schuetz, of Cedar 
Lake, Indiana. She was educated in the country schools of Cedar Lake. 
They are the parents of six children, four daughters and two sons. 

Mr. Scheidt has membership in the Knights of Columbus, the Cath- 
olic Order of Foresters, is a member of the Catholic Church, belongs to 
the Hobart Commercial Club, and is independent in politics. He is 
fond of hunting and fishing as his diversions from business, belongs to 
the Hobart Hunting Club and is regarded as one of the expert trap 
shots in this section. 

Henry Brand. Though one of the recent additions to the mer- 
cantile enterprise of Hobart, Henry Brand has been known in this com- 
munity for many years, and his wife belongs to one of the pioneer 
families. 

Henry Brand, who was born in Germany, February 4, 1869, has had 
an active and varied career. Coming to the United States with his 
parents at the age of sixteen, his early schooling was acquired in Ger- 
many, and after one year on a farm in Ohio he went to Chicago in 1886. 
He had the capacity for hard work and faithful service, and was em- 
ployed with various firms in that city until coming to Hobart. Arnold 
Bros, on Randolph Street had him for seven years; he was then with 
the Weinberg Bros, until that firm sold out, and after that for 4!/2 
years was in the employ of the South Side Elevated Railroad. Coming 
to Hobart in August, 1913, Mr. Brand engaged in a new line of business 
for him, opening a store with a full stock of delicatessen and fancy 
groceries and meats, and has built up a flourishing trade in less than 
a year. 

By his marriage in 1892 to Mary Boldt, Mr. Brand becomes con- 
nected with one of the oldest and most honored Lake County families. 
She was born in Hobart, and was educated in the schools of that town. 
She is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Boldt, the former now 
seventy-six and the latter seventy-five years of age. Both were born 
in Pomern, Germany, and Charles Boldt at the age of thirty-one came 
to the United States, and became one of the early settlers in the vicinity 
of Tolleston, now incorporated in the larger City of Gary. For some 
time he was employed on the Fort Wayne Railroad while locomotive 
engines were still burning wood as fuel. Charles Boldt paid $20 an 
acre for land which is now worth $150, and for a number of years lived 
in practically a wilderness; the wolves howled at night in his back 
yard, and such game as deer was abundant in the woods. He and his 
wife passed through all the vicissitudes of frontier life, have lived to 



738 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

the honor and esteem of old age. Charles Boldt is still owner of 120 
acres of fine land in the vicinity of Hobart. Besides their three sons 
and four daughters, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Boldt have many grand- 
children and three great-grandchildren. 

Mr. and Mrs. Brand have two daughters and one son living. Clarice, 
the oldest, is the wife of H. T. Stratton; Mamie and Maximillian both 
attend school at Hobart ; Frank, the other son, was accidentally killed 
while in the employ of the South Side Elevated Railway Company, 
being electrocuted while in the performance of his duties. Mr. Brand 
has membership in the Masonic order, being affiliated with the lodge, 
chapter and eommandery and Medinah Temple of the Mystic Shrine. 
He is one of the live members of the Hobart Commercial Club, and 
it was his faith in the future possibilities of Hobart as a fine commercial 
center for a progressive community that impelled him to engage in 
business there. Mr. Brand takes great pleasure in the sports of hunting 
and fishing. Of his own family there is a brother and four sisters, one 
in Chicago, two in New York State, and two in Dayton, Ohio. 

F. F. Frank. A substantial and useful citizenship of Lake County 
has included the Frank family since pioneer times. It was nearly sixty 
years ago that the family established itself in this section of Northern 
Indiana, not long after the first railroads were built, and before the 
modern era of development had fairly begun. Mr. F. F. Frank, whose 
home has been at Hobart and vicinity for many years, has applied him- 
self to the activities of farm life, has woii his prosperity and stood well 
in the estimation of the entire community. 

Born in Hobart Township of Lake County, April 22, 1859, F. F. 
Frank is a son of the late William Frank, whose native country was 
Germany, where he was born May 8, 1818. A young man of twenty- 
eight, he crossed the ocean, in 1816, and from New York came west to 
Michigan, locating first in Washtenaw Country, and after seven years 
transferred his residence to Lake County. He settled on land which 
was still in a virgin state, was a factor in early developments, and pro- 
vided comfortably for his family and left property to his descendants. 
In 1851 William Frank married Celinda Kern, who died August 13, 
1913. They were the parents of six children. Mr. F. F. Frank had his 
early schooling in the country, attended the sessions of school until 
he was fifteen, and after that learned to be a skillful farmer on his 
father's place. His entire career has been passed in the vicinity of his 
birthplace, and he owns the old homestead on which he was reared. 
His own place comprises 160 acres, and a mile east is the original farm 
of 132 acres. The old home still stands, but was rebuilt seven years 
ago. This place is now operated under tenant. Mr. Frank's own 
dwelling is a two-story brick house, with all the modern conveniences. 
His success has come through the general lines of farming, and while 
looking after his own interests he has not neglected those which the 
progress of the community imposes upon each individual. 

On September 18, 1890, Mr. Frank married Lydia Bach of Ross 
Township. She was educated chiefly in Chicago. Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
have no children. In politics he is an independent republican, and is 
a member of the German Methodist Church. As a boy he knew Hobart 
when it was a village with only a few houses, and there were only two 
railroads through this section of Indiana, whereas now Lake County 
is a network of rail lines leading in all directions. 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 739 

D. D. Melin. A young banker and aggressive factor in Hobart 's 
commercial circles, D. D. Melin is a member of a substantial family of 
that city, and through his own career has met successive responsibilities 
in such a way as to make him a useful and dependable citizen, and from 
what he has already accomplished his career in the future is likely to 
be one of prominence and great value. 

D. D. Melin was born in Hobart, September 10, 1892. His parents, 
Andrew and Emma Melin, were both natives of Sweden, his father born 
fifty-one years ago and brought to the United States when ten years 
of age, while his mother came to this country when three years of age. 
The father is now general superintendent of the Kulage Brick Company. 
Besides D. D. Melin there are two other sons : Arthur, who is twenty- 
five years of age and a mason by trade, while Ralph is fifteen and still 
in school. 

D. D. Melin was educated in the Hobart High School, graduating in 
1909, and after one year of experience in Chicago in the employ of the 
Wells, Fargo & Company's Express, returned to Hobart and took a 
place with the Hobart Bank, which he is now serving as assistant cashier. 
As a member of the Commercial Club Mr. Melin was elected secretary 
on March 4, 1914. He is a republican in politics and favors good govern- 
ment and local improvements, and is ready to work for them whenever 
possible. During his high school clays he was captain of the baseball 
team two years and of the track team one year, and still retains his 
keen interest in outdoor sports. 

A. M. Hazelgreen. For thirty or forty years a large amount of 
the railway construction work and of other similar types of contracting 
in this county has been performed through the Hazelgreen family. 
While the representative above named is one of the aggressive young 
business men and contractors, with his home in East Gary, it was his 
father who inaugurated that line of business in this county. 

A. M. Hazelgreen was born in Chicago, January 14, 1879, but has 
lived in Lake County since infancy. His father, H. S. Hazelgreen, 
born in Sweden, January 20, 1838, and who died June 26, 1913, came 
to the United States at the age of thirty years, spent one year in New 
York, went west to Chicago, engaged in contracting, and did a large 
amount of pioneer railway construction in Northern Indiana. He had 
charge of the grading for the Baltimore & Ohio through this section, and 
also for the Wabash company. The mother's maiden name was Chris- 
tina C. Blank, born in Sweden, June 26, 1849, and coming to the United 
States in 1863. She lived at Miller, Indiana, and she and her husband 
were married in 1873. Of their family there are four daughters and 
three sons still living. Mrs. Jeannette Ahlberg and Clara E. both reside 
in Seattle, Washington; Mrs. A. Esther Anderson lives at Laporte; 
and Elna J. lives at home. The other two sons are J. William and 
H. Albin, both of whom are unmarried and have their home in Seattle, 
Washington, and H. Albin is one of the leaders in the Luther League 
on the Northwest coast. The daughter Clara a number of years ago 
predicted the founding of the town and the development of the indus- 
trial center at East Gary, and just about twelve years ago drew a map 
on which the town was depicted, and since then East Gary has been 
growing rapidly up to the anticipations of Miss Hazelgreen. 

When A. M. Hazelgreen was a year and a half old his parents located 
at Lake Station, and he lived at home, attending schools at East Gary 



740 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

and the high school at Hobart, until he was sixteen years of age. Since- 
then his career has been almost entirely taken up with railway con- 
tracting, and he was with his father until his death. Mr. Hazelgreen 
is now president of the town board of East Gary, and has been instru- 
mental in effecting many improvements for this community. He has 
led the way in getting the people to indorse and to vote the necessary 
bonds to establish a lighting plant. Mr. Hazelgreen was chiefly con- 
cerned in having the dedication celebration at the opening of the town 
hall, at which time a very elaborate program was held. Mr. Hazelgreen 
is fond of outdoor life, of baseball and fishing, is a republican in politics, 
and a member of the Swedish Lutheran Church. 

James Mundell. While Lake County has been more especially a 
manufacturing and industrial community, its agricultural interests 
have not been insignificant, and in the production of grain and stock 
and other necessities of life there are a large number of enterprises 
which should not escape notice in a review of the county. One of 
Hobart 's best known citizens is James Mundell, and in the course of 
his lifetime he has prospered by utilizing the resources of the soil in 
Lake County, and has been a valuable factor in local civic affairs. 

James Mundell was bom near Hobart, February 28, 1844, and is 
consequently one of the oldest native sons of the county. His father, 
Joseph Mundell, was born in Green County, Pennsylvania, October 13, 
1800, and died August 20, 1888. As another interesting fact in the 
family genealogy, it should be mentioned that Mr. Mundell's grand- 
father lived to be 103 years of age. The Mundells were pioneers in 
Lake County, near Hobart, and on the farm that his father had developed 
from the wilderness Mr. Mundell grew to manhood, obtaining an edu- 
cation in the country schools of the '40s and '50s. Practically his entire 
active career was spent on the farm, with the exception of one year 
in the grocery business in Chicago during 1881, but after that brief 
experience he was well content to return to Hobart and resume the 
management of his large dairy and other farm interests. At the present 
time Mr. Mundell is the owner of 101 acres, and he recently deeded 
about twenty acres to his son. For a number of years he made a spe- 
cialty of dairying, had fine barns, a fine herd of milch cows, supplied 
milk products of a high grade. His son now is making a success of 
beekeeping, and his stands produce for the market more than twenty- 
five thousand pounds every year, that being the figure for last season. 

Mr. Mundell was at Hobart when it hardly deserved the name of 
village, and has seen it grow from an inconsiderable start in the wilder- 
ness when Indians often camped here into a thriving and flourishing 
city. His own residence is a mile out of town on the Ridge Road, and 
comprises a two-story home, with a water system and all the modern 
conveniences. A number of years ago Mr; Mundell bought a parcel 
of land in the Calumet region for $480, and after development had 
started sold a portion of it for over a thousand dollars an acre. He 
still has thirty-five acres that will in the course of a few years un- 
doubtedly be taken up by the great industrial extension now in process 
there. 

On August 1, 1881, Mr. Mundell married Mary Knothe. She was 
born in Chicago in 1853. Her family was the third to locate at Tolleston. 
and they afterwards moved to Liverpool, now known as the Town of 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 741 

East Gary. Mr. and Mrs. James Mundell were married at East Gary 
by Squire Clarke, of Crown Point. They are the parents of two chil- 
dren of their own and one adopted child. The son, Joseph N., married 
Ethel Gearhart, of Hamlet, and has two children. The daughter, Edna 
M., lives at home. Mr. Mundell is independent in politics, and wherever 
possible has favored good government and supported movements for the 
development of his community. 

Frank H. Davis. The public-spirited citizenship of Hobart has no 
better and more devoted leader than Frank H. Davis, cashier of the 
First State Bank of that city. Next to providing for his own material 
welfare, Mr. Davis believes that it is the duty of every man to have 
a part in community affairs, and so far as possible contribute to the 
civic, moral and general upbuilding of his home town. Mr. Davis is 
one of the younger men of Hobart, has made his own way in the world, 
and for a number of years was identified with railroading, and was 
at Hobart in the railroad service until he accepted his present duties 
with the bank. 

Frank H. Davis was born at North Vernon, Indiana, June 15, 1877, 
received his early education in the grade and high schools of his native 
city, attending high school for three years, and his education was fol- 
lowed by seven years' practical experience on a farm with his brother 
at Blackstone, Illinois. He learned telegraphy, went to Alton and was 
employed as a telegrapher with the Chicago & Alton Railroad five years, 
and in the latter part of 1904 transferred his service to the Elgin, 
Joliet & Eastern Railroad at West Chicago. A few months later, on 
June 1, 1905, he came to Hobart, and for seven years was agent at that 
city. He began his career as a banker as cashier of the First State 
Bank on July 1, 1912. 

Mr. Davis affiliates with the Masonic order, the Knights of Pythias 
and the Modern Woodmen of America, is a republican in politics and a 
member of the Methodist Church. His father was a veteran of the 
Civil war, having served three years with the Army of the Cumberland 
in the Fourteenth Army Corps, and was with Sherman on the Atlanta 
campaign and the march to the sea. He married Miss Lillian Mereness, 
who was born in Hobart in 1887. They have one daughter, born in 
December, 1913, and named Elizabeth Margaret. Outside of business 
Mr. Davis finds his recreation in the sport of tennis, and in the varied 
activities of a growing and prosperous community like Hobart. 

His chief enthusiasm is Hobart as a community, and he was the 
first president of the Hobart Commercial Club and served in that office 
for the second year. 

B. G. Thompson. The mercantile enterprise of B. G. Thompson is 
reflected in one of the largest and best conducted establishments at 
Hobart and also at Crown Point and Valparaiso. One of the big ideas 
of modern trade is the consolidated management of several stores under 
one head, and Mr. Thompson has developed his original enterprise in 
Hobart and extended it to two other thriving communities in this sec- 
tion. A merchant of broad and varied experience, Mr. Thompson has 
not relied exclusively upon the routine methods of handling his store, 
but has combined original ideas and is one of the most aggressive cam- 
paigners for trade in Lake County. He began his career a number of 
years ago as a candy manufacturer, was identified with various localities 



742 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

in Canada, in the Northwest section of the United States, in Michigan 
and Minnesota, and after a residence of a number of years in Chicago 
came to Hobart about three years ago, and since that time has set an 
example of progressive merchandising. 

B. G. Thompson was born at Waverly, Iowa, November 20, 1871. 
His father, who lives at Hobart with the son, is now eighty-six years of 
age. When he was an infant his parents moved to Muskegon, Michigan, 
where he attended the grammar schools a short time, and while still a 
boy went to London, Ontario, and was bound out under the old English 
laws as an apprentice to a candy manufacturer. "With three years 
of service in that trade, he started out on his own account, and first 
located at Olympia, Washington, where he was employed under a brother 
in a grocery store. Mr. Thompson has the distinction of having estab- 
lished the first candy factory on the Puget Sound, and after developing 
a good business sold out and returned East. He was in the candy 
business at Menominee, Michigan, for three years, and then established 
himself in Chicago, where he remained until coming to Hobart. Mr. 
Thompson in the various localities of his residence was engaged in 
business on his own account. At Chicago, where he took up his home 
in 1900, he was elected a constable, and held the office for ten years, 
during which- time he was also in the real estate business. After the 
organization of the Municipal Court system of Chicago he was appointed 
United States commissioner. 

On coming to Hobart, Mr. Thompson engaged in business under the 
corporate name of the Thompson Company on May 1, 1911. In one 
small room he opened a stock of goods as a 5 and 10 cent store. Some 
of the most notable mercantile successes in the country have been devel- 
oped through this method of handling goods in small quantities and at 
minimum and regular prices. From the opening of his store his trade 
prospered, and he has subsequently opened stores at Crown Point and 
Valparaiso. Mr. Thompson is secretary and manager of the Thompson 
Company. He effected one improvement on the old 5 and 10 cent 
idea when, in April, 1913, he added a line of groceries to the Hobart 
establishment, and so far as known was the first man to put up gro- 
ceries in small lots at these prices. His Hobart store now has a floor 
space 50x80 feet, with a basement, and its stock is always kept up 
equal to the demands of the trade, and probably no merchant in Lake 
County turns over his goods more frequently than Mr. Thompson. 

His aggressive methods as a merchant have various other illustra- 
tions. He is known throughout the state as a publisher in connection 
with his business of a trade journal known as The Dime. His paper 
has been commended in many letters as one of the brightest trade jour- 
nals in the state. Mr. Thompson publishes and edits the paper him- 
self, and it was established about a year ago, and is distributed free. 

On November 2, 1889, Mr. Thompson married Bertha Kohn, of Gil- 
lett, Wisconsin. She was born in Oconto County, Wisconsin, February 
25, 1868. They are the parents of two sons and one daughter — Phillip 
E., Burt G., Jr., and Eloise L. Phillip is now assistant superintendent 
for the Willard Sons & Bell Forge Works in Chicago; Burt, Jr., is in 
business with his father, while Eloise is in the eighth grade of the Hobart 
public schools and specializing in the study of music. 

Mr. Thompson is prominent in Masonry, with membership in both 
the lodge and chapter. He belongs to the Commercial Club of Hobart 
and to the Crown Point Chamber of Commerce. His work as a citizen 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 743 

has been directed for the general upbuilding and welfare of both town 
and county, and he lends his vigorous support to the improvements 
which help the community as a whole rather than the individual. His 
politics is republican. An enthusiastic sportsman, he and his son gen- 
erally get away for a fishing trip, and his love of outdoor life has had 
much to do with his regular continuance in business. Mr. Thompson 
regards Hobart as one of the best towns in Northern Indiana, and 
believes that with the continued development of the surrounding terri- 
tory its importance as a trade center will materially increase. 

Rev. William Hoff. Numbered among the representative members 
of the priesthood of the Catholic Church in Lake County, Father Hoff 
is now in pastoral charge of the Parish of St. Bridget's at Hobart, and 
is laboring with the consecrated zeal and devotion that have character- 
ized him since he entered upon his holy calling. A man of deep human 
sympathy and of genial personality, Father Hoff gains friends in all 
classes, and has not only built up the spiritual and temporal prosperity 
of St. Bridget's Church, but has concerned himself closely with the 
social and civic welfare of his community at large. 

The community of Hobart has had Catholic services more or less 
continuously for nearly sixty years. In 1855 Rev. Paul Gillen, C. S. C, 
came from Michigan City and celebrated mass in the home of John 
Mellane, near Hobart. During 1858-59 Rev. John Force, of Valparaiso, 
said mass in the same house, and later John Ormond's home was used 
for service when Rev. Alexius Botti came from Valparaiso. In 1871 
Rev. Michael O'Reilly, of Valparaiso, had charge of the mission at 
Hobart, and used the home of John 'Doyle as a church. In 1873 
Father O'Reilly bought the first lot included in the present parish 
property, and continued to give his services to Hobart until 1875. After 
him came Rev. F. X. Baumgartner, who came from the church at Turkey 
Creek from 1875 until 1881. Rev. H. M. Roth, also of Turkey Creek, 
visited Hobart between 1881 to May, 1883, after which Father Baum- 
gartner was the local pastor until 1885. Rev. Joseph Flach held 
services from February, 1885, to July, 1888, and from the latter date 
until February 27, 1903, the local pastor was Rev. Charles V. Stetter. 
Rev. Thomas F. Jansen, now in charge of one of the large parishes of 
Gary, came as resident priest on July 27, 1903, and about that time 
Turkey Creek was made a mission, supplied from Hobart. Succeeding 
Father Jansen came Father Hoff on July 3, 1908. 

On the three lots bought by Father O'Reilly in 1873 stood an old 
picture gallery which was converted into a church building, and is still 
standing as a landmark of the parish, and is now used as a club room 
for young men. That old building was a church until May 30, 1912. 
when the present edifice was dedicated. The original property cost 
$1,100, and forty years ago the parish had about one hundred souls. 
During the administration of Father Jansen he bought the priest's 
house now used, together with an acre of land, costing $6,200. Tbat 
purchase was made in August, 1903. He also added about $1,000 in 
improvements on the old church building. During the pastorate of 
Father Jansen, Lake Station was a mission supplied from Hobart. 

Many changes have been made since Father Hoff came to St. 
Bridget's six years ago. Early in 1911 he called a meeting of the men 
of his parish for the purpose of building a new church and school. 
With the substantial support of the men of his church, he went ahead 



744 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

with the undertaking, and on August 7, 1911, the old church was moved 
from its foundation and work begun on the new edifice, the funds for 
which were raised by private subscription and by church entertain- 
ments. The cornerstone was laid by Father Hoff on October 15, 1911, 
an occasion at which practically the entire population of the town was 
represented. The dedication of the building on May 30, 1912, was a 
notable event, when the bishop of the diocese and thirty-five priests 
assisted in the dedicatory ceremony. The St. Bridget's Church stands 
on a foundation 82x35 feet, with a wing 40x25 feet, and comprises the 
basement and two stories. The second floor is used as the church 
auditorium, while the lower floor has three classrooms. The wing is the 
sisters' quarters. The cost of the building itself was $15,000, while 
some of the individual items of expense were the altar and communion 
rail, costing $680, and the pews cost $500. St. Bridget's Parish now 
has sixty-eight families, numbering 350 souls. The school is planned 
to be opened in September, 1915. The property valuation amounts to 
about $35,000. The grounds have a frontage of about one hundred and 
ten feet on Main Street, one hundred and sixty feet on Center Street, 
and one hundred and eighty feet on Front Street. This is both the 
religious and the social center for the Catholic people of Hobart and 
vicinity. The chief societies are the Married Men's Society, of thirty 
members ; St. Ann 's Married Women 's Sodality, of sixty-one members ; 
the Guardian Angel's Children's Society, of twenty-three members; 
St. Agnes Young Ladies' Sodality, of nineteen members; and St. Aloysius 
Young Men's Society, of twenty-five members. Plans are now under 
way for the organization of a. dramatic society. The young men of 
the church use the old building as a clubroom, and have made it a popu- 
lar organization. The funds to begin with were only ninety dollars, 
but the young men took hold with such vigor as to insure the success 
of the society, and now meet once a month for a formal social and busi- 
ness gathering, while the clubhouse is open for all informal purposes. 

Eev. William Hoff was born in Chicago, March 3, 1878. His parents, 
Martin and Johanna (Guthaus) Hoff are still living in that city, the 
father aged sixty-four and the mother fifty-seven. Both were natives of 
Germany, and came to the United States in 1871. Martin Hoff is a 
veteran of the Franco-Prussian war of 1870, participated in eleven 
battles, without wound, and was one of the victorious forces that entered 
Paris after the fall of that city. Besides William there are three sons 
and two daughters living in Chicago, the sons being engaged in business. 

Father Hoff attended the public schools of Chicago four years, for 
a similar time was in the St. Aloysius parochial school, and at the 
age of fourteen entered the pontifical school at Columbus. Ohio, that 
being the only pontifical college in the United States. He remained 
there with his studies until finishing six years in the classics, two 
years in philosophy and four years in theology. On April 8, 1905, 
Father Hoff was ordained in the seminary chapel at Columbus, Ohio, 
and said his first mass on April 30 in the same year at St. Aloysius 
Church in Chicago. His first regular appointment was as assistant in 
St. Joseph's Church at Logansport, beginning his duties there on May 
11, 1905, and remaining until JitIv 13, 1907. After about a year at 
the Cathedral in Fort Wayne, he received his appointment on July 3, 
1908, as pastor at Hobart. 

Father Hoff is an active member of the Commercial Club, and has 
done much to bring the vigor of the man as well as the priest into his 



Ik 



Q&^6jr^>^^Ue( 




LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 745 

work. He has a great fondness for all outdoor sports, and took a very 
active part in the organization of the Hobart baseball team, having 
served on the committee and done much towards organizing the team. 

0. E. Meek. As to the means and methods of building up a sub- 
stantial business in a thriving city, the experience of 0. E. Meek con- 
stitutes him an authority of information as to his particular line, the 
laundry business. On February 32, 1900, he and his wife opened a 
small shop for laundry and at first did all the work themselves. Out 
of it has grown the Whiting Laundry, with a trade drawn from Whiting 
and vicinity and even from Hammond and Gary. Its first location was 
at 213 One Hundred and Nineteen Street, but after eight years of 
steadily increasing business and prosperity, Mr. Meek built a structure 
specially designed and equipped for his business, a one-story building, 
50x100 feet, at 509-511 Indiana Boulevard. The laundry now employs 
twenty-eight people, and runs four collection and delivery wagons, with 
automobiles for the service of Gary and Hammond trade. 

In 1896 Mr. Meek married Blanch Sheldon, of Marcellus, Michigan. 
Their four children are Blanch, Sheldon, Thelma and O. E., the last 
being deceased. Mr. Meek is affiliated with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, is a 
democrat in politics, and his wife is a member of the Congregational 
Church. 

Frank J. McMichael, M. D. The professional work of Dr. Frank 
J. McMichael began at Tolleston-Gary in the fall of 1908, and has since 
brought him many of the best rewards and the opportunities for able 
service in his vocation. Like many of his contemporaries, Doctor 
McMichael is a young man, and in his profession and in his citizen- 
ship exemplifies the new and progressive spirit of the Calumet region. 

Frank J. McMichael is a native of Michigan, born in the Village 
of Plainwell, May 23, 1884. His parents were John H. and Mary A. 
McMichael, his father a carpenter and builder. Doctor McMichael was 
educated in the public schools, in 1907 took his degree in medicine from 
the University of Michigan and during the following year was physician 
for the Calumet & Hecla Mining Company at Calumet, Michigan, the 
great copper mining district. This was followed by a long trip through 
Wyoming and the Yellowstone Park as physician in charge of the 
Charles C. Moore camping party. With this preliminary experience 
and with his otherwise excellent qualifications Doctor McMichael located 
for practice at Tolleston in the fall of 1908, and now has a general prac- 
tice covering all parts of Gary. He has membership in the Gary and 
Lake County Medical societies and the Indiana State Medical Associa- 
tion. 

Doctor McMichael has taken the Knight Templar degrees in Masonry, 
belongs to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Univer- 
sity; Club of Gary, and the University of Michigan Alumni Association. 
In politics his support is given to the republican party. 

: Edgar A. Ridgely. The successful progress of Mr. Ridgely as a 
Gary merchant is probably familiar to a large proportion of the citizens. 
During less than five years of residence he has become the proprietor of 
two flourishing drug stores, and has identified himself with one of the 
large real estate companies and has done much to develop the city in 



746 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

that line. Mr. Ridgely is a young man in business, has prospered, is 
proud of the prosperity and prestige of his home city, and whenever 
possible is willing to lend a hand to increase its greatness and power. 

Edgar A. Ridgely was born in Richland County, Illinois, July 19, 
1879, a son of G. A. and Martha (Madding) Ridgely. It was on a farm 
that Mr. Ridgely spent his early days, and the wholesome environment 
and training of the country have not been without beneficial effects 
in his business life. The Olney High School supplied him his early 
advantages, continued by attendance at the Normal School in Albion, 
and in 1902 he graduated from the Valparaiso College of Pharmacy. 
After several years of experience in the drug trade Mr. Ridgely, in the 
spring of 1906, bought a store at East St. Louis, which was his location 
until the summer of 1909. In October of the latter year he bought a 
Gary drug store from Harry Stringfellow at the corner of 6th and 
Broadway. That has since been his chief location, and his trade has 
grown in proportion to the development of the city around him. In 
1912 he bought a drug store in Tolleston from the Meyer Drug Company. 

His real estate operations have been conducted through the Ridge- 
more Real Estate Company, of which he is president. This company 
has put on the market Ridgemore Subdivision, located at 25th and 
Chicago Avenue, comprising 923 lots. 

Mr. Ridgely, in November, 1905, married Iva Blanch Huddleston of 
Valparaiso, Indiana. Their two daughters are Bonnie May and Martha. 
Mr. Ridgely affiliates with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
belongs to the Gary Commercial Club, the University Club, is chairman 
of the board of trustees of the Christian Church, and is a progressive 
republican in politics. 

Edwin A. Salisbury. A resident of Gary since 1910, Edwin A. 
Salisbury has been actively identified with business affairs, and is by 
profession a mechanical engineer, a vocation which called him to a 
number of responsible positions in the vicinity of the Great Lakes for 
thirty or forty years. 

Edwin A. Salisbury was born in Genesee County, New York, March 
28, 1856, a son of Henry and Phoebe Sophie Salisbury. His father was 
a substantial New York State farmer. Starting life with a common 
school education, Edwin A. Salisbury soon took up the line for which he 
had the greatest inclination, mechanical engineering, and while doing 
practical work perfected his knowledge and skill by a course in the 
International Correspondence School, from which he holds diplomas in 
both the mechanical and electrical engineering courses. For seven years 
he was chief engineer for the Cuyahoga Building Company of Cleveland, 
for a similar time chief engineer of the Electric Building Company 
in the same city, and then for three years was chief engineer with the 
N. Y., P. & O. Dock Company. Mr. Salisbury spent fourteen years as 
chief engineer on lake steamers, and in the course of his profession has 
been up and down the Great Lakes from end to end and has a large 
acquaintance among the lake marine. Mr. Salisbury has lived in Gary 
since May, 1910. 

In 1879 he married Ella May Griswold of New York State. Their 
two children are: Viola, wife of P. L. Feuer of Gary; and Louise at 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 747 

home. Mr. Salisbury is a member of the Masonic Lodge and Royal 
Arch Chapter, of the Loyal Order of Moose, and professionally has mem- 
bership in the Universal Crafts and Council of Engineers. Politically he 
is identified with the progressive republican party. 

Henry A. Vossler. Since he opened an office in the real estate 
business at Gary, on January 1, 1908, Mr. Vossler \s activities and 
operations have been of a large and varied character and perhaps no 
other individual has handled more Gary real estate than Mr. Vossler. 
Among his associates he is regarded as a man of the keenest judgment 
in all realty matters, and his shrewdness and foresight have made him 
very successful. 

In 1908 Mr. Vossler put on what is known as the East Gary Sub- 
division comprising 644 lots and situated a mile east of Broadway. 
This tract was sold to one man and was never utilized for residence 
lots. Also, in 1908, Mr. Vossler assisted in organizing the Gary Home 
and Improvement Company, of which he is still president, and this 
company put on sale 246 lots in that portion of Gary known as Tolleston. 
In 1909 Mr. Vossler opened and was an interested principal in the 
Broadway Realty and Investment Company's Addition of 384 lots on 
Broadway and 45th Avenue. In 1910 Vossler 's First, Second and 
Third additions, comprising 284 lots in Tolleston, were put on the 
market and in 1912 were followed by Vossler 's Fourth Addition of 138 
lots in Tolleston. Mr. Vossler, with his partner, Mr. Young, built the 
first two theaters in Gary, the Majestic and the Orpheum, and also 
erected a number of residences which were sold for cash or terms to 
local people. 

Henry A. Vossler was born at Ogden, Boone County, Iowa, September 
19, 1876, a son of E. G. and Anna C. (Nickel) Vossler. The father was 
a farmer in Iowa, but in 1881 moved east and located in Grant County. 
West Virginia, where he engaged in merchandising in that locality. 
Henry Vossler was the second in a family of six children, three sons 
and three daughters, the others mentioned as follows: Edward A. E., 
who is in the wholesale hardware business at Wheeling, West Virginia ; 
Emily, the deceased wife of Charles A. Welzel, of Pennsylvania ; Eleanor, 
who lives at Wheeling; Frank A. L., who is an officer in the United 
States Navy; and Anna, who lives at Wheeling. 

Henry A. Vossler had a public schooling, and got his early business 
training under his father's direction in West Virginia. After master- 
ing most of the details of the retail trade, he went on the road as a 
salesman and sold goods until 1907. A visit to Gary in that year 
convinced him of the opportunities awaiting a man of his enterprise. 
and in January. 1908, he returned and opened his real estate office 
in partnership with Verner U. Young. This partnership was dissolved 
on July 1, 1910, and Mr. Vossler has since operated alone. The largest 
sale which he has ever promoted and effected was a tract of 1.285 lots, 
owned by Earle Bros, and which Mr. Vossler sold to the Great Gary 
Realty Company of Cleveland, Ohio. Mr. Vossler affiliates with the 
Masonic Order and is a charter member of the local lodge, and also a 
charter member and trustee of the lodge of Elks in Gary. In politics 
he is a republican. 



748 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

Harvey J. Curtis. While Mr. Curtis has been actively identified 
with the practice of law at Gary since 1909, his services have also been 
largely drawn upon in the practical field of business, and he has pro- 
fessional and financial relations with several of the well known business 
corporations of Gary. His ability and success as a lawyer were proved 
before he came to Gary, and he has been in active practice for more 
than ten years. 

The Town of Argos, Indiana, is claimed by Mr. Curtis as his birth- 
place, where he was born January 20, 1876, a son of Richard and Jane 
(Davis) Curtis. His father was a substantial farmer of that vicinity 
and the son grew up in the country, attended the local schools, later 
a high school and began the .study of law in the office of Charles P. 
Drummond, in the latter 's office at Plymouth, Indiana. Following that 
he became a student in the law department of the University of Michi- 
gan at Ann Arbor, and was graduated LL. B. in 1903. Mr. Curtis 
won his first cases and gained considerable reputation as a lawyer during 
four years of practice at South Bend, from 1903 to 1907, and then came 
to Gary, had an office for independent practice until June, 1909, after 
which he was a member of the firm of Bomberger, Sawyer & Curtis, 
and now of the firm of Bomberger, Curtis, Starr & Peters. 

In November, 1909, Mr. Curtis was elected city attorney of Gary, 
and served until early in 1914. He is a director of the Southside Trust 
& Savings Bank, a director of the Ridgemore Real Estate Company, a 
director of the Gary Home & Improvement Company, director of the 
Oakwood Realty Company, and is also attorney for the South Side. 
Trust & Savings Bank. In 1904 Mr. Curtis married Bessie Johnson 
of Walkerton. Of their three children one is now deceased. His 
fraternal affiliations include membership in the Masonic Order, the 
Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks 
and also the Eastern Star. He is one of the active members of the 
Gary Commercial Club, the University Club, is a democrat in polities 
and a member of the Episcopal Church. 

Dr. Carl Boardman. In his special practice at Gary in the treat- 
ment of eye, ear, nose and throat, Doctor Boardman has brought to that 
city the best training and experience acquired in a long course of study 
and clinical observation in the East, and represents the highest ability 
and best personal qualities of the medical profession. His practice 
in his special line now absorbs all his time and energy, and his standing 
among the medical men of Gary is well indicated by the fact that he 
recently filled the office of president of the Gary Medical Society. 

Dr. Carl Boardman is a native of Minneapolis, born April 24, 1879, 
a son of A. J. and Sarah (Twogood) Boardman. His father is now 
living a retired attorney in Los Angeles, California. Reared in Minne- 
apolis, where he finished the high school course and attended the 
University of Minnesota, in 1900 Doctor Boardman entered the medical 
department of the University of Pennsylvania, and graduated M. D. 
in 1904. Instead of taking up practice and establishing himself after 
the manner of most young medical graduates. Doctor Boardman remained 
in Philadelphia and had a. varied hospital and post-graduate experience 
of 41/2 years, including interne work in several of the Philadelphia 
hospitals and service as an assistant on the staff of the Post-Graduate 
Hospital, during all of which time he directed special study to the 




< ^___ — 



*-> 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 749 

diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat. With this unusual prepara- 
tion he came to Gary in November, 1908, and has since contmed his 
practice entirely to his specialties. In 1911 he once more took post- 
graduate work. 

Doctor Boardman was married in September, 1913, to Leone Fulton 
of Michigan. He has membership in the college fraternity, Fsi Upsilon, 
in the Gary University Club, is progressive in his political views, and 
one of the hardest working and most earnest members of the medical 
fraternity in the Calumet region. In 1910 he served as vice president 
of the Gary Medical Society and in 1913 was honored with election 
as its president. 

Edward P. Wise. The transactions of Edward P. Wise in the real 
estate field have made his name familiar throughout the City of Gary, 
and he has handled property both in large and small tracts in all parts 
of the city. Mr. Wise has been interested in the real estate business at 
Gary for the past six years, and has had his home and headquarters 
there since 1910. Previous to coming west he was in the real estate 
business in Eastern Ohio, and was at one time a successful coal operator. 

Edward P. Wise was born in Washington County, Pennsylvania, 
September 18, 1868, a son of Joseph B. and Ella E. (Blair) Wise. 
His father was a farmer, and the son grew up in the country of South- 
western Pennsylvania, had a common school education, and early in 
life started out to push his own way to success. While working in the 
mines he had an ambition to get above the ordinary rank of miners, and 
while learning to do by doing he was also a student in all his legal inter- 
vals, and took two courses through the Scranton School of Correspond- 
ence, one in English and the other in mining. While in the mining 
industry he worked his way up from the bottom to the position of 
superintendent of Mines No. 1 and No. 2 at Banning, Pennsylvania. He 
was at one time also superintendent of the Hart Company's coal mines 
at Stewartsville, Ohio, and at the Wee Gee mines at Bellaire, Ohio. In 
1895, on leaving his business as mine superintendent, Mr. Wise engaged 
in the real estate business at Bellaire and lived there for the following 
fifteen years. On June 3, 1910, he established his home and head- 
quarters in Gary, but has been handling Gary real estate since 1908. 
While at Bellaire, while dealing in city and local property, he built up 
a large business in selling Texas and Oklahoma farm lands. In Gary 
Mr. Wise has been interested in the following well known subdivisions : 
W. G. Wright's First Subdivision; Jackson Park Subdivision; L. P. 
Hammond's Subdivision. The greater part of his business at the pres- 
ent time is selling improved property, chiefly homes, and he has sold a 
great many to the people of that city. 

On August 27, 1888, Mr. Wise married Sarah E. Branthoover, of 
Washington County, Pennsylvania. Of the eight children born to their 
marriage one is now deceased. Mr. Wise affiliates with the Masonic 
order, is a republican in politics, and is a member of the Gary Y. M. 
C. A. He is also a member of the National Association of Real Estate 
Exchanges, and one of the vice presidents of the Indiana Real Estate 
Association. 

Henry F. MacCracken. A Gary attorney who has successfully 
combined the practice of law with the activities of citizenship and poli- 
tics, Henry F. MacCracken since 1907 has established himself securely 



750 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

in his profession at Gary, where his influence counts as that of a pro- 
gressive leader. In his work Mr. MacCracken has exhibited a fine sense 
of responsibility of the individual to the community, and his abilities 
give him rank as one of the leaders in the Lake County bar. 

Henry F. MacCracken was born at Columbus, Ohio, in 1871. He 
comes of a scholarly family. His uncle, Dr. H. M. MacCracken, is one 
of the distinguished educational leaders in America, is chancellor of 
New York University, and was the leading exponent of the idea which 
was carried out in the founding of the Hall of Fame of the National 
Capitol in Washington. Mr. MacCracken 's parents were George W. 
and Anna (Sparrow) MacCracken. His father was a successful mem- 
ber of the Ohio bar, and was chosen a Wilson delegate to the Baltimore 
convention of 1912, and died just before the convention met. 

After graduating from Wittenberg College at Springfield, Ohio, Mr. 
MacCracken took up the study of law with his father, was admitted 
to the bar in 1898, and was associated with the elder MacCracken in 
practice at Urbana, Ohio, until he removed to Gary in 1907. In his 
native state he became a leader in the democratic party, and in 1904 
was democratic candidate for Congress from the Eighth Ohio District. 

On November 29, 1903, Mr. MacCracken married Mabel E. Carson, 
of Pickaway, Ohio. Their children are: Eichard F., now about four 
years of age; and Mary E. Mr. MacCracken is past exalted ruler of the 
Gary Lodge of Elks, is vice president of the Gary Commercial Club, is 
president of the Gary Bar Association, and his church is the Protestant 
Episcopal. 

Frank J. Sheehan. A graduate in law from the University of 
Michigan, Frank J. Sheehan has been in practice at Gary for the past 
seven years, and has enjoyed a large office and general litigating 
practice. 

Frank J. Sheehan was born in Crawford County, Pennsylvania, 
September 13, 1880, a son of Patrick and Ellen (Shannon) Sheehan. 
His father was a farmer in Western Pennsylvania, and it was there 
that the son grew up, attended the public schools, took his preparatory 
work in the Taber Academy in Massachusetts, and from early manhood 
began to support himself and pay his own way while fitting himself for 
his profession. Mr. Sheehan graduated from the University of Michigan 
in the law department in 1906 and secured his first year of experience 
in Conneaut, Ohio. He identified himself with the new city of Gary 
in December, 1907, and now does a large business in partnership under 
the firm name of Sheehan & Lyddick. 

Mr. Sheehan was married January 9, 1912, to Bessie Vrooman of 
Dowagiac, Michigan. They are members of the Catholic Church and 
in politics he is a republican. 

Earl V. Shimp. The firm of Shimp & Williams, undertakers, 
though recently established in Gary, have developed a splendid service 
in their profession, and both members are expert funeral directors and 
embalmers and have all the material facilities for the successful handling 
of a growing business. The present firm was established November 24, 
1913, succeeding the firm of Simpson & Shimp, which was organized 
June 1, 1913. The headquarters of the firm are at the corner of Sixth 
and Massachusetts streets, where they have the ground floor and base- 
ment of a building 35x75 feet, and all their equipment is modern and 
includes an automobile funeral ear and ambulance. 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 751 

Earl V. Shimp, who was born in Fairfield County, Ohio, September 
4, 1879, is a son of D. R. and Catherine (Shower) Shimp, his father 
being a retired farmer. After graduating from high school, Mr. Shimp 
spent nine years as assistant postmaster of Keystone, Indiana, and in 
the meantime had acquired much practical experience in undertaking, 
and was graduated in 1911 from the Askins Training School for Em- 
balmers at Indianapolis. The first year was spent in the undertaking 
business at Indianapolis, and selling out, he came to Gary in 1912. He 
is thoroughly trained, has wide experience, and is building up a suc- 
cessful business on the basis of honest one-price methods. His firm 
sold the first steel vault in Gary. Mr. Shimp was married in 1900 to 
Estella Risley, of Keystone, Indiana. Mr. Shimp affiliates with the 
Loyal Order of Moose and the Modern Woodmen of America, is inde- 
pendent in politics, and his church is the Baptist. 

Herbert Erickson. As an architect and civil engineer, Mr. Erick- 
son has performed a great deal of important work at Gary during the 
past five years, and has established himself securely in his profession. 
It will be a matter of interest to many Gary citizens to know that Mr. 
Erickson belongs to a family which has contributed one of the greatest 
names in American invention and naval annals. Mr. Erickson 's father 
was a first cousin to the famous John Erickson, who invented and 
perfected the Monitor, the revolving turret battleship which revolu- 
tionized all methods of naval warfare. In his home and office at Gary 
Mr. Erickson has a number of relics from the old Monitor. The family 
still maintains its relations with the United States Navy, since two 
brothers of Herbert Erickson are serving as lieutenants in that branch 
of the nation's defense. Mr. Erickson 's father also saw service in the 
Swedish navy. 

Herbert Erickson was born at Port Wayne, Indiana, June 22, 1885, 
a son of John and Anna Erickson. His mother was a gifted musician, 
possessed a rare voice, and that art was also something of a family 
inheritance, since her cousin was the famous Jennie Lind, the Swedish 
nightingale. John Erickson, the father, was a graduate from a Swedish 
University, and a civil engineer and designer, practically all members 
of the family having followed some branch of engineering. He brought 
his family to the United States in 1873, and located in Indiana. 

Herbert Erickson was for two years a student of the University of 
Wisconsin, and in 1908 came to Gary, worked in architectural lines 
for a few months, and since 1909 has had an office of his own for the 
practice of his profession as architect and civil engineer. His work 
finds examples in several prominent public structures in Gary and 
vicinity. He designed the Swedish Lutheran Church, the Elks Club 
Building, a number of apartments and residences and business houses, 
was architect of the Bank of Whiting, and superintended the building 
of the magnificent Froebel School at Gary. He also laid out the plan 
of the City of East Gary. 

Mr. Erickson was married in 1909 to Grace Sines, of Delphi, In- 
diana. Fraternally he is affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, is a member of the Gary Commercial Club and in politics 
a republican. 

Gary Heat, Light and Water Company. Among the various sub- 
sidiary companies of the United States Steel Corporation, which founded 



752 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

and improved, and has since continued to serve the people of the City 
of Gary, perhaps the most important in its present relations is the Gary 
Heat, Light and Water Company, which furnishes water, gas and elec- 
tric light, and combines under one management three of the most valua- 
ble public utilities. This company was organized January 1, 1907, and 
operates under franchises granted by the city corporation of Gary. At 
the present time there are thirty miles of gas mains extending from 
the company's plant throughout the city, and forty-one miles of water 
mains within the city limits. The supply of water is obtained from 
Lake Michigan, through a tunnel 15,000 feet in length and seventy-two 
inches in diameter, extending under the bed of the lake to a sufficient 
distance from the shore line to insure a supply of water free from pol- 
lution. The pumping station is located in the center of the distributing 
system of the city, and has capacity sufficient to supply a population of 
100,000. The gas is manufactured in the company's own plant, with 
a present capacity of 250,000 cubic feet daily. The electric current for 
lighting and power requirements in Gary is supplied from the Indiana 
Steel Company's works. 

In February, 1908, the company sold 182,000 feet of gas. In Decem- 
ber, 1913, the company distributed to consumers 12,000,000 feet of that 
commodity. In April, 1911, the amount of electricity consumed by the 
patrons of the company was 70,000 kilowatt-hours, while for April. 
1913, the kilowatt-hours aggregated 172,000. Electric current is f m*- 
nished to a number of factories, and lights 360 arc lights and 1,000 
incandescent bulbs. The company has in its employ from forty to one 
hundred men, according to the season. 

The officers of the Gary Heat, Light and Water Company are: L. 
W. McNamee, president and treasurer ; William Luscombe and Leonard 
Fitzgerald, vice presidents; W. J. Mlodoch, secretary and auditor; and 
J. C. Hoot, purchasing agent, of Chicago. 

Leonard Fitzgerald, who has had a broad experience as an engineer 
in connection with public utility plants in various parts of the country, 
was brought to Gary soon after the organization of the Gary Heat, 
Light and Water Company. He was born in Fort Wayne, Indiana, 
March 23, 1882, a son of John H. and Flora B. Fitzgerald. His father, 
who now lives in Houston, Texas, retired, was a gas engineer with the 
Kerr-Murray Manufacturing Company at Fort Wayne and followed 
his profession in various parts of the country. Mr. Fitzgerald received 
a public school education in St. Joseph, Missouri, and at Houston, Texas, 
and in 1900 graduated a mechanical engineer from the Agricultural and 
Mechanical College at Texas. His first practical experience was with 
the Houston Gas Plant for two years, followed by a similar time as 
chemist for No. 2 works of the Gas, Light and Coke Company of Cleve- 
land, Ohio, and one year with the Gas Machinery Company of the same 
city. As superintendent of the North Shore Gas Company, of Wauke- 
gan, Illinois, for three years, Mr. Fitzgerald became well known for 
his ability in both the technical and administrative departments of gas 
and electric manufacturing, and his ability caused his selection by the 
Gary Heat, Light and Power Company in April, 1907, for the con- 
struction of the local plant. He installed the gas and electric machinery 
and service at Gary, and has since been superintendent of those depart- 
ments. 

Mr. Fitzgerald on May 23, 1911, married Camilla Giesey of Wil- 
liamsburg, Pennsylvania. ' They have one daughter. Mr. Fitzgerald 




l^&o&Jg 



^~^- 



-A 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 753 

is a member of the University Club, the Gary Commercial Club, the 
Jovians, the American Gas Institute, the National Commercial Gas 
Association, the National Electric Light Association, and the Indiana 
Electric Light Association. He is on the executive board- of the Retail 
Merchants Association of Gary. His church is the Catholic. 

Charles A. DeLong, M. D. The fourth physician to locate in the 
new City of Gary was Doctor DeLong, whose work has been continuous 
in that community since May 15, 1907. Few physicians in the Calumet 
region have accomplished more or gained higher recognition in the local 
profession than Doctor DeLong, who began his service with exceptional 
equipment and has gained not only a large and profitable private prac- 
tice, but has been several times honored with office in the local medical 
societies. 

Charles A. DeLong was born in Montour, Iowa, December 14, 1873. 
His birth occurred on a farm, and his parents, G. W. and Mary F. 
DeLong, were substantial farming people in one of the rich agricultural 
centers of that state. After finishing his common school education he 
entered Grinnell College of Iowa, and was graduated with bis bachelor 
degree in 1896, and first used his college education as a teacher, a voca- 
tion which he followed for ten terms. During that time he served as 
county superintendent of schools in Tama County for two years. Doctor 
DeLong is a graduate in medicine from the Rush Medical College of 
Chicago with the class of 1905, and after an interneship in the Pres- 
byterian Hospital did his first practice in Morocco, Indiana. Since 
coming to Gary, in May, 1907, he has built up a large general practice 
both as physician and surgeon. 

Doctor DeLong was married in October, 1907, to Helen E. Humphrey 
of North Kortright, New York. They have three children — Robert, born 
in 1908 ; Charles, born in 1910 ; and Ruth, born in 1912. Doctor DeLong 
affiliates with the Knights of Pythias, the Modern "Woodmen of America, 
the Court of Honor, and on the strength of his Scottish ancestry belongs 
to the Scottish Clans. He has served as both secretary and president 
of the Gary Medical Society, also as secretary of the Lake County Med- 
ical Society, and has membership in the Indiana State and the American 
Medical associations. His church is the Congregational, and in politics 
he is progressive. 

Hugh S. Espey, D. D. S. A successful member of the dental pro- 
fession at Gary, having located at Tolleston in 1910, Dr. Hugh S. Espey 
began practice less than ten years ago, and from boyhood has made the 
best of his opportunities for advancement in the world. 

Hugh S. Espey was born at Rising Sun, Indiana, September 22, 1882, 
a son of Frank F. and Charity Espey. His father for many years was 
a merchant at Rising Sun. The public schools gave him the groundwork 
of his educational training, and in 1905 he graduated with the degree 
D. D. S. from the Ohio College of Dental Surgery at Cincinnati. The 
first four years were spent in practice at Vevay, Indiana, and in 
December, 1910, he located at Tolleston and has since gained a profitable 
clientage. Dr. Espey affiliates with the Masonic order up to and includ- 
ing the Knight Templar degrees, belongs to the Mystic Shrine, is a 
member of the University Club of Gary, and his politics is republican 
and his church is the Presbvterian. 



754 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

H. Gershman. The leading merchant tailor of Lowell, Mr. Gersh- 
nian has been a resident of this town for nearly nineteen years, and in 
spite of vicissitudes, with the loss of his business by fire, has brought 
himself to a prosperous position second to none among the large business 
men of the town. His career well illustrates the success which has been 
won by not a few of his fellow countrymen in the free land of America. 

H. Gershman was born at Moscow, Eussia, April 20, 1862, attended 
a private school until twelve years of age, when he became a tailor's 
apprentice, and at the age of twenty-two, having learned the trade of 
tailor, engaged in the business at Ostashkov, which was 120 miles from 
any railroad. He remained there seven years, two years working as 
a cutter in a department store, and five years were spent in business 
for himself. Having sold out, he emigrated to America, arrived in 
Chicago September 5, 1891, and found his first employment as a tailor 
for Morris M. Abrahams on Cottage Grove Avenue. Mr. Gershman 
lived in Chicago until February 15, 1896, and then located at Lowell. 
He opened a small tailoring shop in a room 18x18 feet across the street 
from his present location. The building was then remodeled to 18x36 
feet, with a flat above which he occupied as a residence. Then occurred 
the fire' of 1898 which wiped out the entire block, and it was his misfor- 
tune not to have a cent of insurance. Home and business were destroyed 
and it was by rare good fortune that the members of the family got out 
from the burning building with their lives. With only a reputation for 
good work and reliable business methods as his credit, Mr. Gershman 
then started a shop in the Sanger Building, where the Lowell National 
Bank now stands. He lived in three rooms at the rear of his shop, and 
was soon hard at work in order to once more get a start in the world. 
The following spring he moved his residence to Charles McNay's house, 
and on November 4, 1899, opened a shop in the Castle Building, where 
he put in an up-to-date merchant tailoring store and men's furnishing 
goods department. The entire building was well equipped with new 
stock and furniture, and he had a good stock of woolens. In 1903 the 
furnishing goods stock was sold, and since then Mr. Gershman has 
confined himself entirely to tailoring. In March, 1905, his business was 
moved to its present location in the Johnson Store Building. Mr. 
Gershman acquired ownership of the property in 1912, and in 1913 con- 
structed an entirely new building, a two-story brick, with its ground 
front almost a continuous line of plate glass, behind which are found 
the most modern fixtures throughout the storeroom of 18x50 feet. The 
basement underneath and the flat above complete the equipment. On 
April 1, 1914, he took in as a partner his son-in-law, Charles Berlow, 
and they put in a complete stock of men's wear and furnishings and 
have one of the finest and most patronized establishments in Southern 
Lake County. Their trade extends over three townships, and their 
patronage may be considered county-wide. 

Mr. Gershman was married September 18, 1884, to Dora Propp of 
Moscow, Russia. They have three children, one daughter and two 
sons. Celia was born September 18, 1885 ; Abraham was born Decem- 
ber 23, 1886, and Isaac was born June 20, 1894. The children are all 
graduates of the Lowell High School. Celia married Charles Berlow, of 
Hubbell, Michigan, March 8, 1914. Abraham has taken two terms in 
the Lewis and Armour Institutes of Technology at Chicago and is now 
a traveling salesman for the Universal Battery Company. The son 
Isaac is now a student in the Art Institute of Chicago. Mrs. Gershman 
died February 8, 1903. 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 755 

Mr. Gershrnan has affiliations with Colfax Lodge No. 378, A. F. 
& A. M., and the Eastern Star Chapter No. 360, with Lowell Lodge 
No. 245, I. 0. O. F., Lowell Lodge No. 300, Knights of Pythias, and 
Cedar Camp No. 5155, Modern Woodmen of America, He is also an 
active member of the Lowell Fire Department. In politics he is pro- 
gressive. 

Fred Eibel. Vice president and manager of the plumbing and 
heating department of the Peoples' Hardware Company, the largest 
enterprise of its kind at Gary or in Lake County, Fred Eibel is a 
man whose rise to independence has been the result entirely of his own 
well directed labors, beginning at early years when most boys are still 
in school. He is still a young man, possessed of that aggressive enter- 
prise which is so characteristic of Gary leaders in business, and has a 
secure place both as a business man and citizen of this community. 

Fred Eibel is a native of England, born in the City of London, Sep- 
tember 16, 1877, a son of Joseph and Freda Eibel. His mother came 
to the United States in 1881, locating with her family of children at 
Utica, New York. Her husband had died in England, and there were 
four children, three sons and one daughter, of whom Fred was the 
youngest. From Utica in 1885 the family moved to Rochester, New 
York, where Fred attended the public schools and gained the most of 
his book education. In 1890, when he was only thirteen years of age, he 
began learning the plumbing trade in Chicago, and was employed as 
an apprentice and worker in that line until 1895, when he went to Joliet, 
Illinois. He is a skillful man in his line of business, and had already 
made a reputation before coming to Gary in 1908. Since then he has 
been identified with one of the executives of the People's Hardware 
Company, and as vice president has the entire management of the heat- 
ing and plumbing department. 

On October 25, 1900, Mr. Eibel married Freda Huettner, of Joliet. 
Their three children are : Myrtle, Gertrude and Frederick. Mr. Eibel 
affiliates with the Modern Woodmen of America, his church is the 
German Lutheran, and in politics he maintains an independent stand. 

William Taylor. One of Lake County's successful business men 
is William Taylor, whose home is now at Shelby. Much of his career 
has been spent in the West, but he is a native of Lake County, and 
now has many substantial evidences of material prosperity, all of them 
acquired through a career of strenuous effort and keen business man- 
agement. 

A son of Dewit C. and Emma L. Taylor, William Taylor was born 
August 10, 1871, on a farm which he still owns, situated a mile and a 
half northwest of Lowell. His early education came from the country 
schools, and when sixteen years of age his father was killed by a runa- 
way team. At the age of seventeen he entered Valparaiso College, at- 
tended eighteen months, and returned to the farm and took its active 
management. At the age of twenty-five Mr. Taylor and his mother went 
out to Yuma, Arizona, thence proceeded by stage and horseback to 
Ehrenberg, in Yuma County, where they spent nearly a year. During 
that time Mr. Taylor carried mail on horseback from Ehrenberg to 
Parker, a distance of fifty-two miles, his regular schedule calling for 
two round trips a week. During the course of the trip he seldom saw 
a white person from one end of the road to the other. On one trip, on 



756 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

account of the large volume of mail which made a load for his horse, he 
was obliged to walk the entire distance, since it was impossible to find 
an extra packhorse. AVhile in the Southwest Mr. Taylor was also 
engaged in the merchandise business, and in order to get goods to stock 
his store made a trip with his Mexican teamsters to Phoenix, Arizona, 
a distance of 200 miles of desert road, and during that journey the party 
were compelled to make dry camps, and haul water from one watering 
place to the other. It required twenty days to make the round trip. 
When Mr. Taylor prepared to leave Arizona, he and his mother, with 
their baggage, embarked in a rowboat, and went down the Colorado 
River, with its dangerous rapids and whirlpools, to Yuma, a distance 
of 120 miles. Mr. Taylor carried about his person $500 in gold dust, 
which he subsequently had coined at the San Francisco mint. 

In 1898 Mr. Taylor married Cora L. Kanarr. Two years later, in 
the fall, when their little daughter Edith was five months old, they made 
a trip by wagon to Western Nebraska, and on his return Mr. Taylor 
engaged in the meat business. He built a nice brick building in Lowell 
for this purpose. That was his principal line of business until 1906. 
Then came another excursion to the West. With his wife and daughter 
in one wagon, and his brother-in-law and family in another wagon, the 
party drove to the northern part of Iowa, thence to Hastings, Nebraska, 
then northwest through Cheyenne, Laramie, Lander, Yellowstone Park, 
into Montana, where several weeks were spent in hunting. His brother- 
in-law concluding to stay there for the winter, Mr. Taylor with his 
wife and daughter then struck the trail for the Northwest, passing 
through Butte, Deer Lodge, and passing out of Montana near the Cana- 
dian border and crossing Idaho at Hope, Sand Point, into Spokane, 
Washington, from which point they continued southwest to Raperia, 
crossing the Snake River. While crossing this tortuous and rapid 
stream on a ferry boat, a gale broke the cable, leaving the ferry boat at 
the mercy of the waves. The ferryman took Mrs. Taylor and Edith 
into a lifeboat and conveyed them to shore, leaving Mr. Taylor with the 
team to look out for himself, but as usual he came out unscathed and 
in time was able to continue the journej^. At Pendleton, Oregon, they 
sold the outfit, and took train to The Dalles. From that point they 
proceeded down the Columbia River by boat to Portland, thence by 
rail to California, and after a journey of a number of months, charac- 
terized by incidents and adventures such as never befall the routine 
traveler by railway, they returned to Low T ell. Since that time Mr. 
Taylor has made two other trips to Montana, and has done some big 
game shooting in the West. It is of his adventures as a hunter and 
traveler in the mountain and desert region of the Southwest and North- 
west that Mr. Taylor has his most interesting reminiscences, and espe- 
cially likes to tell of how he was lost in the timber of the Northwest for 
a number of days, and had to depend entirely upon the game he killed 
for food. He now has to show for his early hunting trips a nice bear 
rug. three mounted elk heads, one deer head and several other trophies. 

In 1908, having returned to Lowell, Mr. Taylor again engaged in the 
meat business until 1910. In that year he built the Taylor Theater, a 
concrete structure with a seating capacity of 900, and with such facili- 
ties as make it one of the best equipped theater buildings in Northern 
Indiana. He also erected another substantial brick structure in that 
city. On January 1, 1914, he sold his theater interests, and then ac- 
quired a cement tile factory at Shelby, and also rented the Shelby Hotel, 




^$4- 



LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 757 

which he has put in a first-class condition and of which he is now the land- 
lord. Besides his fine farm of 140 acres near Lowell, Mr. Taylor has 
acquired much other property, is the owner of a section of land in Dundy 
County, some town lots in Hastings, and while getting prosperity has 
also enjoyed life much more than the average man. Mr. Taylor is a 
republican, and one of the influential citizens in his local community. 

Washington Lumber & Coal Company. This business enterprise 
of Indiana Harbor was established and incorporated in February, 1912. 
It handles a full line of lumber, coal and building material and it is the 
largest yard and has the best facilities in Indiana Harbor for prompt 
and satisfactory service to the trade. It handles goods both wholesale 
and retail, and employs from eighteen to twenty-five men in the business. 
The yards of the company occupy half a block of land on the Indiana 
Harbor Belt Railway and 141st Street. The officers of the company 
are G. J. Bader, president; Fred J. Smith, treasurer, and John Schaub, 
secretary. 

J. C. Horn, who is manager of the business, and a progressive young 
business man of the Calumet region, was born in Valparaiso, Indiana, 
in 1886, a son of Peter J. and Sarah A. (Welsh) Horn. Mr. Horn was 
educated at Notre Dame and Valparaiso universities. He was employed 
with the Gary Lumber Company at Gary before coming to Indiana 
Harbor. 

Hoy D. Davis. A young lawyer and real estate man of Gary who 
has had a varied relationship with business affairs in that city during 
the past seven years is Hoy D. Davis, now in the active practice of law 
and associated with Mr. C. 0. Holmes in real estate. 

Hoy D. Davis was born in Pike County, Illinois, June 24, 1878, a 
son of W. H. and Alice A. Davis, his father a merchant. With a public 
school education Mr. Davis looked out for broader opportunities and 
prepared for a business career in the Gem City Business College at 
Quiney, Illinois, and his proficiency in the work caused him to be 
retained by the college management as an instructor for five years. In 
May, 1907, Mr. Davis came to Gary, and as a clerk in the office of A. F. 
Knotts pursued the study of law. For two years he served as cashier 
of the Gary Trust & Savings Bank, and on March 1, 1912, was admitted 
to the Indiana bar, and on January 14, 1913, was admitted to practice 
before the Supreme Court. Besides his law practice he is looking after 
a large business in real estate, and has already done enough to deserve 
consideration among the successful men of Gary. 

Mr. Davis was married, November 10, 1909, to Jennie F. Brunswick, 
of Hammond. They have one son, Hoy D., Jr., aged about three years, 
and a daughter, Alice Jane, born in October, 1914. Mr. Davis is affil- 
iated with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the Gary 
Commercial Club, and in politics is a republican. 

Ingwald Mje. Any history of Gary that would bring out the inter- 
esting facts of its remarkable development would necessarily refer to 
some of the enterprises and innovations effected by Ingwald Moe, who 
is not only one of the city's early residents, but since the beginning 
of Gary has made himself a factor for advancement and improvement. 
Mr. Moe in business is a general contractor and has made a reputation 
outside of his own locality, and besides his individual success has proved 



758 LAKE COUNTY AND THE CALUMET REGION 

his ability to handle and direct other large interests in Gary and else- 
where, and belongs to a group of men who at Gary control and uphold 
the business prosperity of the community. 

A native of Norway, where he was born in a small town a few